Project

Emergentes Erinnern, fragmentierte Syntax und textuelle Kohärenz - Emergent remembering, fragmented syntax and textual coherence (funded by German and Swiss Science Foundations, DFG+SNF)

Goal: 'Emergent remembering, fragmented syntax and textual coherence' investigates how speakers and writers cope with the challenge of telling traumatic experiences (World War II, forced labour, concentration camps, etc.) in order to better understand the extent to which fragmented syntax (restarts, trail-offs, parentheses) is not (only) a symptom of problems, such as remembering or contextualising. Rather, it could also be a strategy to cope with the challenge of relaying these experiences and/or to enhance recipient design in emergent storytelling. The data stems from oral history interviews, collaborative Sofa Talks and French post war literature (Claude Simon, Jorge Semprún, ...). Research is carried out in coordination with the Zürich team of French Literary and Cultural Studies (Director: Professor Dr. Thomas Klinkert).

Date: 12 November 2018 - 10 December 2021

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Project log

Daniel Mandel
added a research item
This article investigates the interactional relevance of weak cesuras in multimodal transitions in enactments. Previous research has pointed out that enactments are multimodally accomplished phenomena in that they do not only consist of a quotation but usually involve changes in prosody and bodily conduct, too. Furthermore, it has been noted that an upcoming quotation may be projected in the preceding talk by phonetic cues. There is, however, little research on the precise multimodal realization of such transitions and their possible interactional relevance. Taking this as a starting point, we analyze a collection of co-enactments. Firstly, we show that quotations are projected not only by phonetic but also bodily cues, which often build up gradually in the preceding talk. These smooth transitions into enactment are analyzed as “cesural areas.” Secondly, we argue that such cesural areas and the cumulation of multimodal projections open up an opportunity space in the sense of Lerner (1991), whereby a joint enactment involving co-participants, i.e., a co-enactment, is possible. Thirdly, we show that participants jointly develop the meaning of the enactment in this space, mutually taking up and elaborating on their prior contributions. The data is taken from a corpus of collaborative storytellings in German.
Stefan Pfaender
added a project goal
'Emergent remembering, fragmented syntax and textual coherence' investigates how speakers and writers cope with the challenge of telling traumatic experiences (World War II, forced labour, concentration camps, etc.) in order to better understand the extent to which fragmented syntax (restarts, trail-offs, parentheses) is not (only) a symptom of problems, such as remembering or contextualising. Rather, it could also be a strategy to cope with the challenge of relaying these experiences and/or to enhance recipient design in emergent storytelling. The data stems from oral history interviews, collaborative Sofa Talks and French post war literature (Claude Simon, Jorge Semprún, ...). Research is carried out in coordination with the Zürich team of French Literary and Cultural Studies (Director: Professor Dr. Thomas Klinkert).