Project

EduPLoP

Goal: Promote the use of design patterns, pattern languages, and pattern methodologies in education.

Methods: pattern workshop, pattern validation, pattern mining, writers workshop

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Project log

Yishay Mor
added 21 research items
During the execution of a flipped classroom course, chances increase students are not at the level scheduled in the initial planning with some students falling behind with their knowledge acquisition and others running ahead. In those cases, adding value during the in-class meetings is much harder for teachers, as they have to take care of all the different knowledge levels. A good way of addressing this problem is to control the learning pace of the group. As a result, the knowledge level of the group will be more homogeneous which makes it easier to add value during the in-class meetings. In previous work we described the pattern CONTROLLING THE PACE. This pattern mainly addresses the course planning, but there are more aspects that need to be taken into account. In this paper we propose five patterns based on our experience that can help teachers to control the pace of student's learning in various aspects.
Enrollment and retention of female students in computer science education remains very low compared to other disciplines, even though numerous efforts have been made to change the status quo. Society begins to recognize the importance of increasing the number of qualified women in information technology, but this has not yet lead to large-scale sufficient improvements when it comes to education. But education is one of the most important areas of human endeavor in need of change as it lays the foundation for a successful career in the IT field. However, there are reports on successful activities and there are research results which point to potential valuable strategies that institutions can apply. In this paper we start to explore the possibilities of applying a pattern approach to describing successful strategies for improving enrollment and retention of female students in computer science education. We propose three patterns: Applicability Highlighting, Inclusive Approach, and Inclusive Representation.
In his late work, the four-volume book The Nature of Order, Christopher Alexander introduces 15 fundamental properties that contribute to the “degree of life” a structure has. The concept of “degree of life”, a concept Al- exander introduces in that work, is a more specific, (at least theoretically) measurable indicator that refers to the wholeness of a form and whether it has the “Quality without a Name”. In our research we are interested whether the 15 properties can be found in domains other than architecture. Alexander himself claims that the properties are universal and he shows many examples in nature, including forms of animals or cells that have these properties and that are alive and vivid. However, all of these examples draw from the physical and therefore geometric world. Do we find the same or similar properties in non-geometrical domains such as education, organizational structure, or software design? Moreover, can these properties really improve the quality – or in Alexander’s words the “degree of life” – in existing forms?
Yishay Mor
added a project goal
Promote the use of design patterns, pattern languages, and pattern methodologies in education.