Project

Early Career Hallucinations Research Group (ECHR)

Goal: The ECHR is brings together early career researchers from across the world who have a shared interest in hallucinations. The ECHR formed this year, and is founded by Dr Ben Alderson-Day and Dr Cassie Hazell. If you are interested in being part of the ECHR, please do get in touch: earlyhallucinations@gmail.com

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Pablo Sabucedo
added a research item
Bereaved people frequently report perceiving the continued presence of the person they lost in the form of a voice, a vision, a felt presence or any other sensory perception. This report explores this psychological phenomenon, experiences of presence, using narrative interviewing and analysis. Ten people were interviewed, in English or Spanish, using a biographical narrative procedure. The analysis, part of a project focused on unwelcome continued presences, was focused on the sources of distress, ambivalence and comfort reported in participant narratives on their experiences, as well as on the sociocultural processes influencing them. Identified properties were grouped into nine categories, with this report being primarily focused on sources related to distress, or ambivalence, and their relevance for clinical practice.
Pablo Sabucedo
added a research item
Objectives Experiences of presence, involving the sensory perception or felt presence of the deceased, are common amongst the bereaved (30–60%). Despite them being predominantly comforting and reassuring, a minority (approximately 25%) report ambivalent or distressing experiences. The study’s aim was to explore how psychotherapy is practised with this subset. Method A mixed‐method approach, involving both quantitative analysis and thematic analysis, was used to analyse data from an online survey, conducted in English and Spanish, amongst mental health therapists (i.e., psychologists, psychotherapists, and counsellors). Seventy responded to the survey and four of them were further interviewed. Results The participants primarily framed interventions for ambivalent‐to‐distressing experiences of presence as grief therapy, with the severity of the presentation as the main factor influencing their clinical decision‐making, but several perspectives co‐existed regarding how to intervene. These discourses were categorized into two themes: ‘A normalising and exploratory psychotherapy’ and ‘A grief stages psychotherapy’. The main sources of patient’s distress, as understood by the sample, were located in the bereaved–departed relationship, in pre‐existing mental health issues, and in a societal taboo or stigma. Conclusion After comparing and contrasting the participants’ working hypotheses with existing knowledge on experiences of presence, and contemporary theories in the research area, guidelines are presented on how to intervene with people disturbed by their experiences of presence. Practitioner points • Perceiving the deceased person, or feeling their presence, is common and normal amongst bereaved people. • When these experiences are distressing or ambivalent, therapists’ share that psychological suffering may originate from the departed–bereaved relationship, pre‐existing mental health issues, or the effect of societal taboo or stigma. • Psychotherapy is frequently aimed at normalizing, accepting, supporting, and exploring patient’s experience
Pablo Sabucedo
added a research item
After two decades of quiescence, clinical psychedelic research re-started in the 1990s and is rapidly accelerating. Early evidence for effectiveness is promising, but understanding of the psychological processes of change underlying observed benefits is limited. This paper outlines contextual behavioral science (CBS) as an ideal framework for understanding psychedelic experiences and the psychological processes of change involved in psychedelic assisted therapy. This paper argues that CBS-based therapies, such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), can contribute to deepening and maintaining the often profound acute effects of psychedelics. The paper begins by briefly outlining the current state of clinical psychedelic research. It then progresses to outlining why CBS may be uniquely positioned to potentially increase the efficacy of psychedelic-assisted therapy, how this scientific model fits with existing data on psychedelic-assisted therapy, as well as with leading neuroscientific theories such as the entropic brain theory. Finally, it concludes by suggesting avenues for future research on how CBS could contribute to psychedelic science, and vice versa.
Imogen Bell
added a research item
Common approaches to the psychological treatment of distressing voice hearing experiences, such as cognitive behavioural therapy, aim to promote more adaptive cognitive, emotional and behavioural responses to these experiences. Digital technologies such as smartphones show promise for supporting and enhancing these treatments by linking immediate therapeutic settings to the context of daily life. Two promising technologies include ecological momentary assessment and intervention (EMA/I), which may offer a means of advanced assessment and support in daily life, and inform the tailoring of interventions to suit individual needs. In this study, a highly novel intervention approach was developed involving four face-to-face sessions with a psychologist blended with EMA/I between sessions in order to improve coping with distressing voice hearing experiences. The authors describe the background and development of this approach along-side a single case illustration, which supported feasibility and acceptability. This study details how digital technologies such as EMA/I may be used in future as clinical tools to enhance standard psychological treatments and clinical care of people with persisting and distressing experiences.
Prabitha Urwyler
added a research item
Research into hallucinations typically regards them as single sensory or unimodal experiences leading to a comparative neglect of co-occurring multi-sensory hallucinations (MSH). People with psychosis who have visual hallucinations (VH) report high rates of hallucinations in other senses (auditory, olfactory, tactile). However, it is not known if this is similar to other groups who report VH. Consequently, this study explored MSH in four different patient groups who all had current VH. Archival data from standardised assessments of visual hallucinations in people with psychosis (n = 22), eye disease (ED) (n = 82), Lewy body Dementia (LBD) (n = 41), and Parkinson's disease (PD) (n = 41) determined the presence of MSH. People with psychosis and visual hallucinations reported significantly higher rates of MSH (auditory, 73%; tactile, 82%; olfactory/gustatory hallucinations, 27%) than the LBD group (auditory, 21%; tactile, 28%; olfactory/gustatory, 6%), ED (auditory, 1%; tactile, 11%; olfactory/gustatory, 0%) and PD patients (auditory, 3%; tactile, 8%; olfactory/gustatory, 3%). Regardless of diagnostic grouping, participants with MSH reported greater conviction that the VH were real, and reported greater distress. People with psychosis with VH report high rates of MSH unlike groups of older adults with VH. These between group differences in MSH prevalence have implications for clinical practice and theory.
Imogen Bell
added a research item
Background Smartphone-based ecological momentary assessment and intervention (EMA/I) show promise for enhancing psychological treatments for psychosis. EMA has the potential to improve assessment and formulation of experiences which fluctuate day-to-day, and EMI may be used to prompt use of therapeutic strategies in daily life. The current study is an examination of these capabilities in the context of a brief, coping-focused intervention for distressing voice hearing experiences. Methods/designThis is a rater-blinded, pilot randomised controlled trial comparing a four-session intervention in conjunction with use of smartphone EMA/I between sessions, versus treatment-as-usual. The recruitment target is 34 participants with persisting and distressing voice hearing experiences, recruited through a Voices Clinic based in Melbourne, Australia, and via wider advertising. Allocation will be made using minimisation procedure, balancing of the frequency of voices between groups. Assessments are completed at baseline and 8 weeks post-baseline. The primary outcomes of this trial will focus on feasibility and acceptability of the intervention and trial methodology, with secondary outcomes examining preliminary clinical effects related to overall voice severity, the emotional and functional impact of the voices, and emotional distress. DiscussionThis study offers a highly novel examination of specific smartphone capabilities and their integration with traditional psychological treatment for distressing voices. Such technology has potential to enhance psychological interventions and promote adaptation to distressing experiences. Trial registrationAustralian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry, ACTRN12617000348358. Registered on 7 March 2017.
Cassie M Hazell
added 4 research items
The experience of hearing voices (‘auditory hallucinations’) can cause significant distress and disruption to quality of life for people with a psychosis diagnosis. Psychological therapy in the form of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for psychosis is recommended for the treatment of positive symptoms, including distressing voices, but is rarely available to patients in the United Kingdom. CBT for psychosis has recently evolved with the development of symptom-specific therapies that focus upon only one symptom of psychosis at a time. Preliminary findings from randomized controlled trials suggest that these symptom-specific therapies can be more effective for distressing voices than the use of broad CBT protocols, and have the potential to target voices trans-diagnostically. Whilst this literature is evolving, consideration must be given to the potential for a symptom-specific approach to overcome some of the barriers to delivery of evidence-based psychological therapies within clinical services. These barriers are discussed in relation to the United Kingdom mental health services, and we offer suggestions for future research to enhance our understanding of these barriers.
Background: Few patients have access to cognitive behaviour therapy for psychosis (CBTp) even though at least 16 sessions of CBTp is recommended in treatment guidelines. Briefer CBTp could improve access as the same number of therapists could see more patients. In addition, focusing on single psychotic symptoms, such as auditory hallucinations ('voices'), rather than on psychosis more broadly, may yield greater benefits. Method: This pilot RCT recruited 28 participants (with a range of diagnoses) from NHS mental health services who were distressed by hearing voices. The study compared an 8-session guided self-help CBT intervention for distressing voices with a wait-list control. Data were collected at baseline and at 12weeks with post-therapy assessments conducted blind to allocation. Voice-impact was the pre-determined primary outcome. Secondary outcomes were depression, anxiety, wellbeing and recovery. Mechanism measures were self-esteem, beliefs about self, beliefs about voices and voice-relating. Results: Recruitment and retention was feasible with low study (3.6%) and therapy (14.3%) dropout. There were large, statistically significant between-group effects on the primary outcome of voice-impact (d=1.78; 95% CIs: 0.86-2.70), which exceeded the minimum clinically important difference. Large, statistically significant effects were found on a number of secondary and mechanism measures. Conclusions: Large effects on the pre-determined primary outcome of voice-impact are encouraging, and criteria for progressing to a definitive trial are met. Significant between-group effects on measures of self-esteem, negative beliefs about self and beliefs about voice omnipotence are consistent with these being mechanisms of change and this requires testing in a future trial.
Access to psychological therapies continues to be poor for people experiencing psychosis. To address this problem, researchers are developing brief interventions that address the specific symptoms associated with psychosis, i.e., hearing voices. As part of the development work for a brief Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) intervention for voices we collected qualitative data from people who hear voices (study 1) and clinicians (study 2) on the potential barriers and facilitators to implementation and engagement. Thematic analysis of the responses from both groups revealed a number of anticipated barriers to implementation and engagement. Both groups believed the presenting problem (voices and psychosis symptoms) may impede engagement. Furthermore clinicians identified a lack of resources to be a barrier to implementation. The only facilitator to engagement was reported by people who hear voices who believed a compassionate, experienced and trustworthy therapist would promote engagement. The results are discussed in relation to how these barriers could be addressed in the context of a brief intervention using CBT techniques.
Peter Phalen
added a research item
Extensive research confirms that people with psychotic disorders suffer high levels of social stigma on average. However, psychotic-like experiences show incredible diversity and cannot reasonably be understood as a monolithic category. It is plausible that voice-hearing experiences with benign content might elicit less stigma than those with negative content, and researchers have hypothesized that culturally or theologically consistent voice-hearing experiences might elicit no stigma at all. The present study evaluated these hypotheses by testing how voice-hearing experiences that varied in terms of valence and the presence or absence of religious content affected stigma responses (i.e., perceived dangerousness and desired social distance) among people who were high or low in religiousness. Participants read vignettes describing two people who hear voices: one with positive content (complimentary, supportive) and the other negative (insulting, homicidal). Via random assignment, half read vignettes that attributed the voice to Abraham Lincoln whereas the other half read vignettes that replaced the words "Abraham Lincoln" with the word "God". Results suggested that different voice-hearing contents elicited different levels of stigma. More religious participants perceived God-hearers to be less dangerous and desired particularly low levels of social distance from people who were described as hearing the voice of God saying positive things. Religiousness was associated with decreased stigma only in the context of specific voice-hearing experiences, lending support to the hypothesis that the stigma of voice-hearing experiences is determined as a simultaneous function of the contents of the experiences and the cultural context within which they are embedded.
Ben Alderson-Day
added 7 research items
People with schizophrenia who hallucinate show impairments in reality monitoring (the ability to distinguish internally generated information from information obtained from external sources) compared to non-hallucinating patients and healthy individuals. While this may be explained at least in part by an increased externalizing bias, it remains unclear whether this impairment is specific to reality monitoring, or whether it also reflects a general deficit in the monitoring of self-generated information (internal source monitoring). Much interest has focused recently on continuum models of psychosis which argue that hallucination-proneness is distributed in clinical and non-clinical groups, but few studies have directly investigated reality monitoring and internal source monitoring abilities in healthy individuals with a proneness to hallucinations. Two experiments are presented here: the first ($\textit{N}$ = 47, with participants selected for hallucination-proneness from a larger sample of 677 adults) found no evidence of an impairment or externalizing bias on a reality monitoring task in hallucination-prone individuals; the second ($\textit{N}$ = 124) found no evidence of atypical performance on an internal source monitoring task in hallucination-prone individuals. The significance of these findings is reviewed in light of the clinical evidence and the implications for models of hallucination generation discussed.
Musical hallucinations (MH) account for a significant proportion of auditory hallucinations, but there is a relative lack of research into their phenomenology. In contrast, much research has focused on other forms of internally generated musical experience, such as earworms (involuntary and repetitive inner music), showing that they can vary in perceived control, repetitiveness, and in their effect on mood. We conducted a large online survey (N = 270), including 44 participants with MH, asking participants to rate imagery, earworms, or MH on several variables. MH were reported as occurring less frequently, with less controllability, less lyrical content, and lower familiarity, than other forms of inner music. MH were also less likely to be reported by participants with higher levels of musical expertise. The findings are outlined in relation to other forms of hallucinatory experience and inner music, and their implications for psychological models of hallucinations discussed.
Readers often describe vivid experiences of voices and characters in a manner that has been likened to hallucination. Little is known, however, of how common such experiences are, nor the individual differences they may reflect. Here we present the results of a 2014 survey conducted in collaboration with a national UK newspaper and an international book festival. Participants (n=1566) completed measures of reading imagery, inner speech, and hallucination-proneness, including 413 participants who provided detailed free-text descriptions of their reading experiences. Hierarchical regression analysis indicated that reading imagery was related to phenomenological characteristics of inner speech and proneness to hallucination-like experiences. However, qualitative analysis of reader's accounts suggested that vivid reading experiences were marked not just by auditory phenomenology, but also their tendency to cross over into non-reading contexts. This supports social-cognitive accounts of reading while highlighting a role for involuntary and uncontrolled personality models in the experience of fictional characters.
Cassie M Hazell
added an update
Please follow the ECHR twitter account to find out about all the amazing work being done by our members. Our Twitter handle is @echrgroup (https://twitter.com/echrgroup)
 
Cassie M Hazell
added a project goal
The ECHR is brings together early career researchers from across the world who have a shared interest in hallucinations. The ECHR formed this year, and is founded by Dr Ben Alderson-Day and Dr Cassie Hazell. If you are interested in being part of the ECHR, please do get in touch: earlyhallucinations@gmail.com