Project

ERGOMAS Military and Police Relations Working Group

  • David M Last
    David M Last
  • Marina Caparini
  • Irina Goldberg

Goal: Marina Caperini and I will co-chair this working group of the European Research Group on Military and Society (ERGOMAS).

The working group aims to advance the mutual understanding of police and military forces addressing new security challenges.

Topics addressed by the working group include, but are not limited to:
Comparative study of functional divisions: the division of labour between military, gendarme, and police forces
Comprehensive approach to security institutions and whole-of-government strategies for security
Militarization of civilian police in society
Civilianization and remilitarization of gendarme and military forces
Military police
Military and police transformation and modernization
Organizational competition within the security sector
Training, education, and socialization of military and police forces in comparative perspective
Privatisation of military and police functions
The roles of police (individual police officers, formed police units and/or stability police) in peace operations and coalition operations.

Methods: Participant Observation, Critical Theory, Action Research, Legitimation code theory, Practitioner research

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Project log

David M Last
added a research item
Neoliberal globalization describes the impact of markets on the movement of people and assets across boundaries in a capitalist world. Police, paramilitary, and military functions are undermined in this global market place; states have less control over factors affecting human security, national security, and international security. Police and military may exacerbate violence and injustice, but they can also lead progressive or stabilizing changes. Can police and military operations converge to support peace and justice in the face of evolving threats like loss of social cohesion, interstate competition, survival migration, climate change, and a precarious underclass? This research is a survey of political economy literature not explicitly related to police-military convergence, but relevant to it. The research yields a menu of concepts and problems that are important for security professionals, but not widespread in either military or police education. Understanding the security implications of corporate and economic conflict, rules and legal constraints, socio-economic class, and transnational threats are essential for the military and police leaders, beginning early in their careers. This suggests research and teaching in higher education institutions for military and police. If we don’t teach political economy to security leaders, they will be unprepared for a world in which soldiers do global policing, police wage wars, and money manipulates the operational environment.
David M Last
added an update
The 10 December deadline is fast approaching for the June 2019 ERGOMAS conference in Lisbon.
We currently expect three panels for Working Group 9 on Military and Police Relations:
  • Military and Police Cooperation in Domestic Operations
  • Military and Police Relations in Border Security
  • International Policing and Military Operations
Registration and abstract submission is through the website at http://www.ergomas.ch
Attached is the call for papers for the working group, sent out earlier in the year, and a second call from Uzi Ben Shalom for a book project on police, military, and borders.
If you are interested, but can't make the deadline, please send an email to David Last (last-d@rmc.ca) and Marina Caparini (marina.caparini@sipri.org) and we will try to hold a space until you can get your abstract in to us.
We look forward to seeing you in beautiful Lisbon!
best wishes for the season,
David and Marina
Marina Caparini, PhD
Senior Researcher, Peace and Development Programme, Stockholm International Peace Research Institute
David Last, PhD
Associate Professor, Political Science
Royal Military College of Canada
 
David M Last
added 5 research items
Mr. Peter Tinsley decided on 30 September 2008 that the complaints lodged by Amnesty International Canada and the British Columbian Civil Liberties Association (AIC-BCCLA) fall within the mandate of the Military Police Complaints Commission (MPCC). The Attorney General disagrees, drawing a distinction between the conduct of operations and the execution of Military Police functions for which the MPCC has oversight. As a retired army officer teaching politics at Canada’s Royal Military College, this seems to me to raise questions about oversight of operations, organizational culture, and the role of civil society in getting the operational balance right under circumstances where there may be no right answer. RMC might have a role in answering these questions. In this discussion paper, I’ll consider some of the issues the ongoing investigation seems to raise, and suggest how we might proceed with round tables and facilitated in camera discussions.
Interviews suggest that Israel has limited tolerance for international peacekeeping, and is generally suspicious of international involvement. UNDOF and MFO serve useful purposes because they reflect agreement by the parties. UNIFIL has hampered Israeli security, and UNTSO is largely irrelevant. The “Grapes of Wrath” mission served a useful purpose for the same reason that UNDOF and MFO worked, however The International Presence in Hebron (TIPH) has little impact from the Israeli point of view. The EU monitors reporting to Javier Solana have served some useful purposes, negotiating the end to the standoff at the Church of the Nativity for example. Their utility, however, is dependent upon the skills and personal status of individuals and resources their home-countries provide; it has not been effectively institutionalized. It is unlikely that renewed security cooperation between Israeli and Palestinian police will be possible without international supervision, and the role for international monitors is not likely to be agreed or accepted easily. Lack of trust at the working level, Israeli unwillingness to abandon settlements in the West Bank and Palestinian forces’ choice of identity as “freedom fighters” in opposition to Israel rather than “police” serving their own communities make cooperation impossible. Conflicts within the Palestinian security forces make them unstable partners. As the dominant party, Israel will not accept willingly any framework for international policing or monitoring that might be manipulated by the Palestinian authority to pursue goals incompatible with Israeli security. The prerequisite is therefore Palestinian acceptance of Israeli core interests with respect to borders, Jerusalem, and right of return. Some Israelis, however, feel that the current impasse will inevitably result in international intervention, and are beginning to ask how that intervention might be shaped in ways that minimize potential harm to Israeli interests. International forces within Israel are unacceptable, but forces to monitor Palestinian Authority border crossings, air space and policing might make useful contributions. Culturally sensitive international policing in Jerusalem’s old city and contested holy places might also be part of a solution. Any international monitoring missions will have to focus on selecting and developing small numbers of high quality participants prepared to serve for long enough to learn the complexities of the region. Neither Israelis nor Palestinians appear to have much patience with “the usual suspects” associated with the current missions in place.
Police assistance has evolved to include more variations on the themes of policing, monitoring, and training assistance, although the motivations for contributing have been consistent for as long as Canada has sent police abroad. International police, repatriated police, training assistance, training of trainers, institutional capacity building, and technical management assistance are six distinct policy options. Helping other countries to develop the capacity to provide police assistance to conflict-affected countries is a good option, and techniques like Rapid Assessment Process, borrowed from health and development project evaluation, can be used to get the balance of policing assistance right over time. Authors
David M Last
added an update
Greetings ERGOMAS members and friends,
Please find attached a Call for Papers for a Special Issue of the Journal of Military Studies (JMS) on Military Sociology.
The deadline for abstract submission is 29 March 2018 and the deadline for article submission is 1 September 2018. Proposed abstracts should be submitted to Professor Teemu Tallberg, who will be guest editing this special issue with LtCol, Ph.D. Mikael Salo and Associated Professor, Ph.D. Valdemar Kallunki. Subject heading for the email when submitting an abstract should read, “Abstract Submission for JMS.” Additional information on the Journal of Military Studies may be found on the journal’s official website:https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/jms .
Contact information
Teemu Tallberg, Ph.D.
Professor of Military Sociology
Department of Leadership and Military Pedagogy
Contact Information: teemu.tallberg@mil.fi
Best regards,
Irina
Irina Goldenberg, Ph.D. Section Head: Recruitment and Retention Research DGMPRA | DGRAPM Chief Military Personnel | Chef du personnel militaire National Defence | Défence nationale Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, K1A 0K2 irina.goldenberg@forces.gc.ca irina.goldenberg@drdc-rddc.gc.ca Telephone | Téléphone (613) 901-9776 Government of Canada | Gouvernement du Canada
 
David M Last
added an update
Dear ERGOMAS members and friends,
Please find attached a Call for Papers from Connections: The Quarterly Journal for a special issue on Defence Institution Building. The Call can also be accessed at the following link: https://connections-qj.org/special-issue-defense-institution-building .
Deadline for submission of full text articles is 30 April 2018. Interested authors are invited to submit their original texts through the Submissions Management System. Articles should not exceed 5000 words.
For related NATO initiatives see the following NATO webpagehttps://www.nato.int/cps/en/natohq/official_texts_21014.htm
Best regards,
Irina
Irina Goldenberg, Ph.D. Section Head: Recruitment and Retention Research DGMPRA | DGRAPM Chief Military Personnel | Chef du personnel militaire National Defence | Défence nationale Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, K1A 0K2 irina.goldenberg@forces.gc.ca irina.goldenberg@drdc-rddc.gc.ca Telephone | Téléphone (613) 901-9776 Government of Canada | Gouvernement du Canada
 
David M Last
added an update
From Verena Wisthaler, PhD, Eurac Research.
Proposals due by 10 Feb; acceptance by 12 Feb, Register by 15 Feb.
Conference 22-25 August in Hamburg
The following panel announcement might be of interest to ERGOMAS Working Group 9, since there is clearly a policing and security dimension in the integration of immigrants at subnational level.
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Dear colleagues,
I would like to draw your attention to the panel we are putting together for the ECPR General Conference in Hamburg on immigrant integration at the subnational level. The panel is part of the Section 28 (ECPR Standing Group on Migration and Ethnicity) Evaluating Policies of Immigrant Integration and Their Outcomes: A Critical Assessment from a Multilevel Perspective. https://ecpr.eu/Events/SectionDetails.aspx?SectionID=720&EventID=115
We will be happy to receive first your own paper proposal, and second if you could forward the call for papers to your relevant contacts!
Best wishes and hope to see you soon
Verena
Going subnational: Immigration Responses and Immigrant IntegrationPolicies of Sub-State Actors in Multi-Level States.
Panel Chairs: Dr.Verena Wisthaler (Swiss Forum for Population and Migration Studies,University of Neuchâtel, and Eurac Research, Bozen) and Catherine Xhardez (Sciences PoParis)
This Panel discusses independently-developed immigration selection programs andsubnational immigrant integration policies co-existing with national policies to stimulatetheory-building in this research area. The Panel includes case studies on immigrantintegration policies across various world regions.
Immigration and immigrant integration have increasingly become a salient political issuein numerous countries. States experiencing multi-levels politics and federations are noexception. Several factors, including increased decentralization and local autonomy,have supported an intensification of subnational policy-making in these policy sectors.As a result, independently- developed immigration selection programs andsubnational immigrant integration policies are co-existing with national policies. So far,most of the research on this tendency has focused on the impact of sub-statenationalism and linguistic differences on discourses and policies surroundingimmigration. As a result, regional immigration or immigrant integration policies of sub-states without national aspirations have far less been scrutinized than those ofregions with nationalist aspirations. When it has been, analysis has tended to becountry-specific and resistant to comparison.
This panel aims at exploring this productive research area: What are the responsesof sub-state actors to immigration or immigrant integration in multi-level states, withand without nationalist mobilizations? What typologies can be used? What are theexplanatory variables for sub-state immigration and immigrant integration policyconvergence or divergence? What can be gained from comparing across countriesand regions in this policy sector? The answers to these questions will likely engagein a finer definition and categorization of the sub-state responses to immigration andimmigrant integration. This exercise should also stimulate theory-building in thisgrowing and promising research area.
This panel welcomes sub-state case studies from various world regions analyzing sub-stateimmigrant or immigrant integration responses and policies. Communications providing a strongempirical background as well as a comparison of regions with and without nationalistmobilizations are particularly welcomed
Submission Information
The submission deadline for proposals is February 10th, 2018. Proposals should notexceed 250 words, and have a clear research question and a hint on the data andmethodology the paper relies upon. All proposals should be sent tocatherine.xhardez@sciencespo.fr and verena.wisthaler@eurac.edu
The selected participants will be notified of their acceptance on February 12th and have toregister themselves via ECPR before February 15th, 2018
For any further questions please do not hesitate to contact us.
Convenors:
Catherine Xhardez (Sciences Po Paris & Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles): catherine.xhardez@sciencespo.fr
Verena Wisthaler (Swiss Forum for Population and Migration Studies, University of Neuchâtel,& Eurac Research, Bozen): verena.wisthaler@eurac.edu
Verena Wisthaler, PhD
Eurac Research
Institute for Minority Rights
T +39 0471 055 231
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I-39100 Bozen/Bolzano
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Latest publication:
V. Wisthaler (2016), “South Tyrol: the importance of boundaries for immigrant integration”, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, Vol. 82/8, 1271-1289, DOI: 10.1080/1369183X.2015.1082290;
S. Jeram, A. van der Zwet and V. Wisthaler (2016), “Friends or Foes? Migrants and Sub-state Nationalists in Europe”, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, Vols 82/8, 1229-1241, DOI:10.1080/1369183X.2015.1082286;
 
David M Last
added an update
Members or followers of the Military and Police Relations Working Group might be interested in the Veterans in Society Conference. Military veterans moving to police forces, common aspects of career-family adjustment, and different benefits are some of the areas that might be addressed.
The following notice comes from ERGOMAS Secretary, Irina Goldenberg.
Dear ERGOMAS members and friends,
This is a reminder that the deadline for submissions for the 2018 Veterans in Society conference is in two weeks.
Some aspects of the conference schedule include:
· a keynote panel on women, war, and moral injury in developing countries;
· luncheon speaker- a Canadian Forces veteran, Capt (ret) Medric Cousineau, SC whose first-person account of being a veterans activist promises to make for interesting comparisons and contrasts with US veterans politics;
· session for researchers to discuss formative research and works in progress, supported by scholars who have published on veterans topics; and
· a concluding round table on the state of veterans studies as an academic field.
The conference  registration system is now open. For additional information visit the website https://veteransinsociety.wordpress.com/ or contact Bruce Pencek (bpencek@vt.edu) or Jim Dubinsky (dubinsky@vt.edu).
Happy holidays everyone and all the best for New Year!
Irina
Irina Goldenberg, Ph.D. Section Head: Recruitment and Retention Research DGMPRA | DGRAPM Chief Military Personnel | Chef du personnel militaire National Defence | Défence nationale Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, K1A 0K2 irina.goldenberg@forces.gc.ca irina.goldenberg@drdc-rddc.gc.ca Telephone | Téléphone (613) 901-9776 Government of Canada | Gouvernement du Canada
 
David M Last
added an update
After two panels at ERGOMAS 2017 in Athens we are happy to report that Working Group 9, Military and Police Relations, is active again. Remarks at the opening plenary highlights the salience of issues for this working group: cybersecurity, refugees and migration, internal security, border policing, and hybrid warfare. Our first panel on the 14th biennial ERGOMAS conference included presentations by Panagiota Chatzilymperi (@chatzilymperi) and Ferenc Molnar (@molnar) attended by 21 people from 10 countries, evenly divided between men and women, and including the oldest and newest members of ERGOMAS. Our second panel included presentations from three Polish sociologists from the Department of the Sociology of Dispositional Groups at the University of Wroclaw. The abstracts can be found in the attached conference program. Contact details for 22 interested scholars in attendance were collected by the co-chairs, Marina Caparini and David Last.
The attached paper summarizes some themes and possible future directions for research in the working group:
  • methodological questions;
  • strategic questions;
  • operational and tactical questions; and
  • questions about personnel policies, recruiting, selection, retention, and promotion within the military and police in comparative perspective.
 
David M Last
added a research item
Police, gendarme, and security forces have co-evolved with states since the origin of the Westphalian system. Their governance structures and functions therefore reflect the history of each polity we might examine. Some security organizations have also evolved transnational aspects, such as colonial police, INTERPOL cooperation and international peacekeeping and policing. This evolution reflects both dominant interests within states (Brodeur's high policing) and those of communities at large (low policing). Both domestic and transnational aspects of governance and division of security functions are partially transferred when the international community attempts to reconstruct or reform the security sector of a post-conflict or weak state. Such target states are also affected by a global political economy, which includes informal and illegal sectors thriving on disorder. Diversity creates three specific problems for the security sector: identity-based economies linked to crime; identity-based conflicts linked to domestic and transnational violence; and identity-based tensions that manifest within security organizations, making it difficult to deal with the other two. The good news is that many countries have passed through these problems to develop stable and effective security sectors. I attempt to generalise about the elements of successful adaptation to diversity. Author David Last served with the Canadian Forces for 30 years, including various NATO and UN missions. He has taught Politics and War Studies at RMC since 1999, researching management of conflict in Sierra Leone, the Balkans, and Israel/Palestine.
David M Last
added an update
Professor David Last and Dr. Marina Caparini of SIPRI are co-chairing a working group on military police relations, which will sponsor a round table discussion “Police and Military: Converging practices and common interests?” Some areas of mutual interest might be border security and mass migration, responses to “weaponized” refugees, and the spectrum of military and police operations in domestic and international stabilization. We hope that you will consider attending the ERGOMAS conference in Athens, 26-20 June 2017 (http://www.ergomas.ch/index.php/conference), and particularly the Working Group on Police and Military Relations (h@ttp://www.ergomas.ch/index.php/working-groups/9-the-blurring-of-military-and-police-roles)
 
David M Last
added a project goal
Marina Caperini and I will co-chair this working group of the European Research Group on Military and Society (ERGOMAS).
The working group aims to advance the mutual understanding of police and military forces addressing new security challenges.
Topics addressed by the working group include, but are not limited to:
Comparative study of functional divisions: the division of labour between military, gendarme, and police forces
Comprehensive approach to security institutions and whole-of-government strategies for security
Militarization of civilian police in society
Civilianization and remilitarization of gendarme and military forces
Military police
Military and police transformation and modernization
Organizational competition within the security sector
Training, education, and socialization of military and police forces in comparative perspective
Privatisation of military and police functions
The roles of police (individual police officers, formed police units and/or stability police) in peace operations and coalition operations.