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Dynamics of African Studies

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Osakue Stevenson Omoera
added a research item
Interdisciplinary scholarship is very vibrant in Nigeria despite the Covid-19 pandemic. The outcome of this issue of the quint: an interdisciplinary quarterly from the north is solid evidence of the resilience and resourcefulness of Nigerian scholars during the global pandemic that wrought havoc everywhere in the world. All articles submitted for consideration and accepted for publication in the quint 13.4 were subjected to rigorous evaluation. Using diverse but appropriate methodologies tools, the contributors speak to various issues that confront Nigeria and Nigerians both at home and in the diaspora. The volume indexes the rich interdisciplinary and trans-disciplinary outlook of the humanities in Nigeria as an animated hub of 21st global scholarship.
Charles Onomudo Aluede
added a research item
This essay examines folksongs and its links with communities and cultures. It is this relationship which makes it look as a property of all. In this work, we reflected on metamorphosis of folksongs into parody and the height it has reached in Nigeria. It examines the new age of digitalisation which ought to be a blessing in Nigeria but looks more of a threat to intellectual property and its associated economic gains. It concludes that there is an urgent need to step up some substantive areas of property law to accommodate modern realities.
Osakue Stevenson Omoera
added a research item
The art of music-making is a mental/creative activity. However, spiritual influence cannot be ruled out in the process of constructing music. The mental activity is akin to the deployment of the intellect, while the spiritual influence could be as a result of a direct encounter or impartation by a spirit being through dream/ vision as typified by two Nigerian performing artists, Majek Fashek and Victor Uwaifo, who are the foci of this study. Exploring the concept of esotericism with emphasis on music performance, this article contends that although music-making is a mental/creative activity, spiritual or extra-mental influences supervene, with particular reference to the lives and performance careers of the two selected African musicians/media celebrities from Benin City in Nigeria. In doing this, it uses historical-analytic, key informant interview (KII), and direct observation methods to critically reflect on how the supernatural influences their music-making activities.
Osakue Stevenson Omoera
added 2 research items
Ceremonial activities abound in traditional African societies whose functions are still very much germane to contemporary milieus in Nigeria and elsewhere. These ceremonies are often accompanied with much music and dance and, of course, music and dance constitute an integral part of masquerade performance. Several studies have been done on Igbabonelimhin as a masquerade performance, especially in relation to its potentiality for geriatric and entertainment purposes. This present effort examines the extra-theatrical functions of Igbabonelimhin with a view to X-raying its ritualistic and cleansing propensities and the need to incorporate these offerings into the social fabric of contemporary Esan society, the whole essence being the promotion of a more harmonious and progress-minded society.
Osakue Stevenson Omoera
added a research item
The study examined the learning environment as a challenge to the provision of quality early childhood education in public primary schools in Esan West Local Government Area of Edo State, Nigeria. The descriptive survey research design was adopted for this study while a total of 117 teachers were sampled from a population of 468 in all the public primary schools in the locality. Data was collected using random sampling. The instrument used was a questionnaire entitled “Challenges of Early Childhood Education Questionnaire” (CECEQ) while the mean and standard deviation was used to answer the research questions in the study. The findings revealed there are no appropriate school facilities and learning materials in public schools for the teaching of the pre-primary school pupils in Esan West Local Government Area. Hence, it was recommended that the relevant authorities such as the ministry of education, among other development agencies, should facilitate the provision of adequate instructional materials such as toys, books, charts, educational media technology and school facilities such as toilets and game equipment so as to ensure the holistic development of preschoolers.
Osakue Stevenson Omoera
added 3 research items
This study interrogates the intersection of proverbs and gender in Nigeria from a multidimensional perspective. Employing content analysis and historical approaches this study contends that apart from the fact that proverbs are made from the experiences and activities of women and men in the society and that people need the wisdom of proverbs (language) to conform to societal norms and achieve the desired lifestyle, Nigerian proverbs and gender enrich and influence each other, when viewed from the feminist perspective. It also argues that Nigerian proverbs are ubiquitous, versatile and resilient as well as abusive of the womenfolk. Hence, the work is discussed under the following sub-heads: Nigerian proverbs and ubiquity; the versatility and resilience of Nigerian proverbs; Nigerian proverbs and gender roles; imbalance in the hierarchical division of labour and the role of government; derogatory proverbs on women; and conclusion where it recommends, among other things, that the government, churches, mosques, traditional religion and other agencies of socialization should prohibit all derogatory proverbs against women; cultural aficionados, among other stakeholders should explore the possibility of funding and organizing seminars to compile and publish corpuses on Nigerian proverb; educational authorities should make compulsory and enforce the study of Nigerian proverbs in schools and institutions of higher learning as a way of sustaining our cultural heritage; and that the government should put in place the infrastructure to give Nigerian women their legitimate space in the society and governance.
In Nigeria, it is customary to protect adolescents from receiving education on sexual matters in the false belief that ignorance will encourage chastity. Unfortunately, the terrible results of unprotected sexual activity among adolescents are becoming glaring and devastating. They include high rate of unwanted teenage pregnancies, increase in the spread of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, child abuse, rape, sexual promiscuity and other associated problems. Therefore, this paper argues the urgent need to refocus on sexuality education among Nigerian adolescents by refocusing on re-orientation which could be effectively done through the instrumentality of theatre (drama).
This paper affirms that the influence of Sophocles’ Antigone on Elechi Amadi’s The Concubine is thickly palpable though the former is a play written hundreds of years back by a Greek and the latter a novel written only a few years ago by a Nigerian. Using the content analysis approach, it contends that in spite of the fact that Sophocles and Elechi Amadi are from two different periods of literature and culture, they both express life differently: one, by means of drama and the other, by means of novel, it would appear that there is a strong evidence of the influence of Antigone on Elechi Amadi’s The Concubine. Hence, this paper textually underscores the arty connection through an examination of certain differences and concordances between the two literary works.
Osakue Stevenson Omoera
added 6 research items
The healing effect of music on man is very significant in most parts of the world. However, not much has been done by African researchers to study music and the ailments it heals especially among the peoples of Nigeria. This work examines the therapeutic effect of music in Iyayi society of Esan community, Edo state of Nigeria. The concept of illness, illness causation, the healing system and the specific songs used in healing of some ailments are investigated. It was found that music in the society is used as medicine as well as accompaniment to healing rites. The study concludes that Iyayi songs hold much promise for the development of pan African music therapy and as such should be notated. It therefore recommends that Iyayi songs are of immense benefits in the treatment and management of labour pains,insomnia and general debilities.
The healing effect of music on human beings is very significant in most parts of the world. However, not much has been done by African researchers to study music and the ailments it heals especially among the peoples of Nigeria. This study uses the case study approach to examine the therapeutic effect of music in Iyayi society of Esan community, Edo state of Nigeria. The concept of illness, illness causation, the healing system and the specific songs and music used in the healing of some ailments are investigated. It was found that music in Nigerian society is used as a therapeutic medium as well as accompaniment to healing rites. The study concludes that Iyayi songs hold much promise for the development of pan African music therapy and as such should be notated. Iyayi songs are of immense benefits in the treatment and management of labour pains, insomnia and general debilities.
This paper examines the issue of democratisation and the role of the theatre artiste in the Nigerian context. It adopts the historical and analytical methods to argue that an enhancement of the social condition is necessary for the nurturing of a true democracy, characterized by a robust political atmosphere which ultimately engenders socioeconomic and socio-cultural development of society. In doing this, it attempts to provide answers to certain posers: has there been an enabling social condition which allows the operation of a democratic system of government in Nigeria? If the social condition has existed, has there ever been a democratic system of government in Nigeria? The paper further appraises the role of the theatre artiste, as agent of one of the several segments of the Nigerian society that have contributed to the many attempts at democratisation and concludes that he/she must liberalise his/her art by taking it to the masses as a way of sensitizing them to contribute to the entrenchment of true democracy in a country which is in dire need of democratic ethos.
Osakue Stevenson Omoera
added a research item
The paper examines Igue ceremony, which is an annual religious and cultural event celebrated by the Benin speaking people of Edo State, Nigeria. As a communal and spiritual activity, the Benins mark Igue with pomp. Within this context, the paper adopts the historical and descriptive approaches as its method of contending that some events during Igue are colourful theatrical performances. It concludes that the artistic performances present as well as represent in many ways than one, the common goals, the common aspirations and the common ancestry of the Benin tribe.
Osakue Stevenson Omoera
added a research item
This paper is based on the theatre for development (TFD) project embarked upon by the researcher in Andaha community, near Akwanga town in Akwanga local government area of Nasarawa state, Nigeria in 1998. Although it is over a decade since the project was executed, contemporary challenges such as lack of potable water, poor refuse disposal systems and management, lack of access roads, poverty and low level of awareness on health issues, especially in rural settings, impel this reflection. Thus, the thrust of this paper is not only to show the significance of TFD but to note the extent communities can network and galvanize efforts, through self help to socio-economically empower themselves in the face of daunting challenges that might have been foisted on them by bad political leadership. The research adopted the “homestead” and historical approaches as its methodology and concluded by recommending that TFD should be deployed in the pursuit of the millennium development goals (MDGs), vision 2020, management of the Niger-Delta crisis as well as the revival and sustenance of indigenous cultural heritage in Nigeria.
Osakue Stevenson Omoera
added 6 research items
Ceremonial activities abound in traditional African societies whose functions are still very much germane to contemporary milieus in Nigeria and elsewhere. These ceremonies are often accompanied with much music and dance and, of course, music and dance constitute an integral part of masquerade performance. Several studies have been done on Igbabonelimhin as a masquerade performance, especially in relation to its potentiality for geriatric and entertainment purposes. This present effort examines the extra-theatrical functions of Igbabonelimhin with a view to X-raying its ritualistic and cleansing propensities and the need to incorporate these offerings into the social fabric of contemporary Esan society, the whole essence being the promotion of a more harmonious and progress-minded society.
Dance and music are integral components of Esan culture and the Igbabonelimhin, an acrobatic masquerade performance among the male folks is one of the major traditional dance/music types of the people. This paper employs the historical methodology to investigate the origin of this genre, the training of the performers and its context of performance. While striving to achieve this, it discovers that in spite of its uniqueness and aesthetic appeal, the opportunities for Igbabonelimhin performances are thinning out by the day. It is in view of this that this paper advocates the deployment of the screen media approach, specifically the video-film technology to document, preserve and re-propagate Igbabonelimhin dance-theatre for local and international audience. This is because the folk dance, if kept alive will not only serve as a means of solidarity and social cohesion among the Esan, possibly boost trade and tourism potentials of Nigeria but also serve as a window into the indigenous culture and tradition of the Esan people.
This study explores the form, content and meaning of dance in Esan land, with particular focus on the acrobatic, masquerade dance-theatre called Igbabonelimhin. Dance is said to be as old as mankind and serves as a means of expressing emotions such as joy, sorrow, hope, victory and power. It is the movement of the human body to certain rhythms within a given space/time and is mainly classified into indigenous/ traditional and modern forms. While modern dances are often consciously and deliberately choreographed for stage/screen performances, indigenous dances are usually patterned after the life styles, myths and folklores of communities, thereby using artistic means to express and boost their cultural values. Dances in the indigenous mode are usually communal assets because they are ethnic in nature. It is within this compass that this study, adopts as its theoretical frame, one of Richard Anderson’s cultural anthropological approaches known as “emic”, which simply refers to an indigenous or local perception, perspective or interpretation of issues of sociological interest to explore the essence of the Esan’s Igbabonelimhin. In the end, the paper affirms that the Igbabonelimhin has the panache of the key features of an ethnic dance, and as such could be correctly categorised as a purely traditional dance-theatre which serves as a vehicle for social cohesion, solidarity and cultural continuity of the Esan race.