Project

Digital genres and open science: an analysis of processes of generic hybridity, innovation and interdiscursivity

Goal: Web 2.0 has brought about dramatic changes in the transmission and dissemination of science, facilitating the communication between scientists and also with non-specialized audiences. Digital affordances facilitate the emergence of hybrid genres and the combination of genres to form complex generic assemblages (genre sets, genre systems and genre ecologies) to communicate science to diversified audiences.
In this context, this project seeks to respond to the problematization of the traditional concept of genre and explore the use of genre repertoires to communicate science openly on the Internet. Our purpose is to identify the intertextual relationships in the new combinations of genres afforded by the digital environments, paying special attention to processes of generic innovation through the use of multimodal elements, and processes of generic hybridization, and appropriation of non-scientific discourses.

You can visit our website for more information: http://genci.unizar.es/

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Project log

Rosana Villares
added a research item
This paper describes the design of an innovative approach to teaching and learning academic communication and intercultural linguistics in the English Studies field to foster competencies for participation in the Digital Society. More specifically, we describe the learning outcomes, sequence of tasks and assessment of competencies for an itinerary of collaborative multimodal online tasks focused on the creation of a Citizen Science (CS) project linked with SDGs. These tasks drew on a genre-based pedagogy and task-based learning in connection with language and digital competencies. We conclude that the integration of CS and SDGs in the educational objectives of the course enables us to embrace the digital transition by promoting open and innovative education and training in transversal skills, digital and intercultural communication, language mediation and English.
María José Luzón
added a research item
The conference Digital Genres and Open Science focuses on the rapidly evolving repertoire of genres that support Open Science communication practices online. Specifically, it aims to be a space for reflection and analysis on the opportunities that digital genres offer to communicate science openly to various audiences and of the challenges that composing these genres poses for researchers and academics. Free registration: http://genci.unizar.es/conference/
Carmen Pérez-Llantada
added a research item
DIGITAL SCIENCE ACTION GROUP (D_SCI) is a multidisciplinary research group of researchers in the fields of computation and physics of complex systems, biomedic al and health sciences, data science, applied linguists, and specialists in languages for specific purposes, academic writing, digital literacy development and science journalism. It s aim is to understand how scientists communicate their work in digital media and to assess critically if digital science is sustainable, transformative and transversal. This report contextualizes the survey research carried out by this group, highlights the most salient findings and provides some general recommendations for good practice. Please cite this publication as follows: Pérez-Llantada, Carmen; Abián, Olga; Cadenas-Sánchez, Cristina; Carciu, Oana; Clemente-Gallardo, Jesús; Erviti, Mari Carmen; Labayen, Idoia; León, Bienvenido; Ollero, Alfonso; Oses Recalde, Maddi; Rivera, Diego; Vela, Alberto; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Villares, Rosana; Vivas Peraza, Ana Cristina (2022), “Digital Science: Sustainable, transformative and transversal. Final report”, Mendeley Data, V1, doi: 10.17632/2yv5brwxg5.1
María José Luzón
added 2 research items
Websites offer research groups a powerful tool for self-promotion and dissemination of their research to a diversified audience. The aim of this study is to explore how research groups affiliated to a research institution in a non-Anglophone country compose their websites to achieve visibility and impact and reach multiple audiences. Content analysis of the websites and semi-structured interviews were used to examine the language(s) in which the websites are written and their content. The study shows that through these websites research groups address simultaneously the international disciplinary community and various local audiences and that these audiences shape the choice of language and content. Findings from this study provide insights into new communication and representation practices engaged in by research groups to meet disciplinary goals, requirements for funding, and society’s demands.
Twitter has become a common feature of academic conferences, used by organizers to provide information about the conference and by attendees to engage in discussion about the conference topics, share information, and create social links and networks within the community. This study examines the tweets from two conferences in Applied Linguistics in order to analyse the networked language practices of scholars using Twitter during conferences. More specifically, in this study we address the following questions: (i) what are the purposes for which scholars in this disciplinary community use Twitter during conferences? (ii) how are different semiotic resources (e.g. linguistic forms, pictures, videos, embedded slides) combined to orchestrate meaning and achieve these various rhetorical purposes? We also look at how Twitter features (hashtags, replies, retweets, mentions) contribute to these rhetorical purposes. The analysis reveals that tweets are mostly intended to create and maintain cohesive links or to encourage peers to perform specific actions. In order to achieve these functions scholars compose their tweets by using a variety of (linguistic and non-linguistic) expressions of stance and engagement (Hyland, 2005). We suggest that, given the increasingly important role of social media for scholarly communication, a central concern of EAP courses should be to help students develop the competence of composing multimodal texts. Scholars need to understand the ways in which the multiple semiotic resources available to them in social media can be used effectively to engage other members of the community in these new digital contexts.
María José Luzón
added an update
The conference focuses on the rapidly evolving repertoire of genres that support Open Science communication practices online. Specifically, it aims to be a space for reflection and analysis on the opportunities that digital genres offer to communicate science openly to various audiences and of the challenges that composing these genres poses for researchers and academics.
 
María José Luzón
added an update
This book presents an overview of the wide variety of digital genres used by researchers to produce and communicate knowledge, perform new identities and evaluate research outputs. It explores the role of digital genres in the repertoires of genres used by local communities of researchers to communicate both locally and globally, both with experts and the interested public, and sheds light on the purposes for which researchers engage in digital communication and on the semiotic resources they deploy to achieve these purposes. The authors discuss the affordances of digital genres but also the challenges that they pose to researchers who engage in digital communication. The book explores what researchers can do with these genres, what meanings they can make, who they interact with, what identities they can construct and what new relations they establish, and, finally, what language(s) they deploy in carrying out all these practices.
 
Rosana Villares
added an update
We invite proposals for presentations at the Digital Genres and Open Science international conference, to be held online at the University of Zaragoza (Spain) on 26-27 May 2022.
The conference focuses on the rapidly evolving repertoire of genres that support open science communication practices online. It aims to bring together scholars, researchers, and professionals from different disciplinary backgrounds, and to be a space for reflection and analysis on the opportunities that digital genres offer to communicate science openly to various audiences and of the challenges that composing these genres poses for researchers and academics.
The ABSTRACT submission DEADLINE for the conference is 18 February . For further information on the event, please refer to the conference website: http://genci.unizar.es/conference/ We look forward to receiving your abstract and seeing you at the conference! With kind regards,
The organizing committee
 
María José Luzón
added a research item
This book presents an overview of the wide variety of digital genres used by researchers to produce and communicate knowledge, perform new identities and evaluate research outputs. It explores the role of digital genres in the repertoires of genres used by local communities of researchers to communicate both locally and globally, both with experts and the interested public, and sheds light on the purposes for which researchers engage in digital communication and on the semiotic resources they deploy to achieve these purposes. The authors discuss the affordances of digital genres but also the challenges that they pose to researchers who engage in digital communication. The book explores what researchers can do with these genres, what meanings they can make, who they interact with, what identities they can construct and what new relations they establish, and, finally, what language(s) they deploy in carrying out all these practices.
María José Luzón
added 2 research items
In the 21st century academic activity and communication are mediated by digital technologies, which enable scholars to engage in new social practices. Although ethnography is an appropriate approach to analyse these practices, the online environment, with its constraints and affordances, requires adjustments in pre-digital ethnography, regarding, among others, how the setting of research is defined, or how observation or interviews are conducted (Garcia, Standlee, Bechkoff, & Cui, 2009). This chapter provides a review of ethnographically-oriented research on academic communication in online settings and of the different ethnographic approaches that are being used to analyse scholars’ digital practices. By doing so, the chapter contributes to the overall aims of the book by offering useful insights to advance the methodological knowledge of researchers interested in (online) academic practices.
Carmen Pérez-Llantada
added a research item
Abstract: This article investigates science dissemination practices on the Internet across the disciplinary spectrum and maps out the mono-/multilingual uptake of those practices. Results show that the production of traditional genres for expert-to-expert communication is mainly English-only, coerced by research policies and ‘genre regimes’ privileging publications in ISI-indexed journals, the majority of them English medium. New digital genres and generic innovations have little impact on the researchers' communication practices and are only associated with some discipline and language groupings. When it comes to communicating science to lay audiences, multilingual practices and the deployment of some digital genres, modes and media become prevalent. This is a Share Link providing 50 days' free access to this article until April 25, 2021. https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1chgNzlIu5tpX
María José Luzón
added a project goal
Web 2.0 has brought about dramatic changes in the transmission and dissemination of science, facilitating the communication between scientists and also with non-specialized audiences. Digital affordances facilitate the emergence of hybrid genres and the combination of genres to form complex generic assemblages (genre sets, genre systems and genre ecologies) to communicate science to diversified audiences.
In this context, this project seeks to respond to the problematization of the traditional concept of genre and explore the use of genre repertoires to communicate science openly on the Internet. Our purpose is to identify the intertextual relationships in the new combinations of genres afforded by the digital environments, paying special attention to processes of generic innovation through the use of multimodal elements, and processes of generic hybridization, and appropriation of non-scientific discourses.
You can visit our website for more information: http://genci.unizar.es/