Project

Daily Assessment in Arthritis Study

Goal: This daily diary study of 152 older adults with knee osteoarthritis and their spouses focuses on spouses’ daily behaviors (e.g., empathic responses, autonomy support, and solicitousness). Our overall goal is to examine the effects of daily positive and negative spousal behaviors on patient functioning (pain, mood, sleep, physical activity) and whether daily illness cognitions (i.e., self-efficacy, catastrophizing) explain these effects. Patients and spouses were assessed three times per day using electronic diaries while also wearing accelerometers to measure daytime physical activity. We are also exploring the impact of gender on dyadic processes.

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Project log

Ruixue Zhaoyang
added 7 research items
Pain catastrophizing has been shown to predict greater pain and less physical function in daily life for chronic pain sufferers, but its effects on close social partners have received much less attention. The overall purpose of the present study was to examine the extent to which pain catastrophizing is an interpersonal coping strategy that is maladaptive for patients and their spouses. A total of 144 older knee osteoarthritis patients and their spouses completed baseline interviews and a 22-day diary assessment. Multilevel lagged models indicated that, on days when patients reported greater catastrophizing in the morning, their spouses experienced more negative affect throughout the day. In addition, a higher level of punishing responses from the spouse predicted greater pain catastrophizing the next morning, independent of patient pain and negative affect. Multilevel mediation models showed that patients' morning pain catastrophizing was indirectly associated with spouses' negative affect and punishing responses via patients' own greater negative affect throughout the day. There was no evidence that spouses' empathic or solicitous responses either followed or preceded patients' catastrophizing. These findings suggest that cognitive-behavioral interventions that reduce pain catastrophizing should be modified for partnered patients to address dyadic interactions and the spouse's role in pain catastrophizing.
Background Sedentary behavior (SB), which has been linked with numerous adverse health outcomes, is prevalent among adults with osteoarthritis (OA). The associations between SB and daily physical and psychological health outcomes for OA patients, however, have received little attention. Purpose Using accelerometer and self-report data, the current study examined how the amount of time OA patients spent in SB was associated with their pain and affect in daily life, independent of physical activity. Methods Over 22 days, 143 older adults (mean age = 65 years) with knee OA wore an accelerometer to measure SB and physical activity, and also reported their pain and affect three times a day using a handheld computer. Multilevel analyses were conducted to examine the prospective within-person associations between SB and subsequent pain or affect within the same day and across days, independent of physical activity. Results The time spent in SB daily predicted less pain but worse affect at the end of that day, above and beyond the effects of physical activity, as well as demographics and individual differences in general health and depression. Moreover, cross-day lagged analyses indicated that time spent in SB on 1 day predicted higher negative affect the next morning. Finally, the average level of SB was also associated with worse average affect at the between-person level. Conclusions SB may be related to less pain in the short term but detract from patients’ emotional well-being. Future intervention should aim to reduce daily SB to improve OA patients’ emotional well-being.
The current study tested the hypotheses that knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients and spouses who report more spousal understanding of patient's pain would report greater marital satisfaction. A total of 124 couples completed interviews at three time points across 18 months. Results from dyadic analyses showed that patients who felt more understood by their spouse report, and have spouses who report, higher marital satisfaction concurrently. In addition, patients who felt more understood by their spouse reported higher marital satisfaction over time. Spouses' reports of understanding also had a significant influence on the patients' and their own marital satisfaction concurrently. Results highlight the importance of spouses understanding knee OA patients' pain for both dyad members' marital satisfaction.
Ruixue Zhaoyang
added a project goal
This daily diary study of 152 older adults with knee osteoarthritis and their spouses focuses on spouses’ daily behaviors (e.g., empathic responses, autonomy support, and solicitousness). Our overall goal is to examine the effects of daily positive and negative spousal behaviors on patient functioning (pain, mood, sleep, physical activity) and whether daily illness cognitions (i.e., self-efficacy, catastrophizing) explain these effects. Patients and spouses were assessed three times per day using electronic diaries while also wearing accelerometers to measure daytime physical activity. We are also exploring the impact of gender on dyadic processes.
 
Ruixue Zhaoyang
added a research item
Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the within-day and cross-day prospective effects of knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients' self-efficacy to engage in physical activity despite the pain on their subsequent physical activity assessed objectively in their natural environment. Method: Over 22 days, 135 older adults with knee OA reported their morning self-efficacy for being physically active throughout the day using a handheld computer and wore an accelerometer to measure moderate activity and steps. Results: Morning self-efficacy had a significant positive effect on steps and moderate-intensity activity throughout that day, above and beyond the effects of demographic background and other psychosocial factors as well as spouses' support and social control. The lagged effect of morning self-efficacy on the next day's physical activity and the reciprocal lagged effect of physical activity on the next day's self-efficacy were not significant. Positive between-person effects of self-efficacy on physical activity were found. Conclusions: Future research should aim to better understand the mechanisms underlying fluctuations in patients' daily self-efficacy, and target patients' daily self-efficacy as a modifiable psychological mechanism for promoting physical activity. (PsycINFO Database Record