Project

DRYvER: Securing biodiversity, functional integrity and ecosystem services in drying river networks

Goal: DRYvER is a Horizon 2020 project, which aims to collect, analyse and model data from nine drying river networks in Europe and South America to create a novel global meta-system approach that incorporates hydrology, socio-economics, ecology and biogeochemistry in order to craft strategies, tools and recommendations for adaptive management of river networks. Working in collaboration with resource managers and citizens, the DRYvER team plans to co-develop new strategies to mitigate and adapt to the effects of climate change on these networks by integrating quantitative and qualitative perspectives, including nature-based solutions with a strong socio-economic and legislative component.

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Project log

Bálint Pernecker
added an update
Intermittent rivers and ephemeral streams (IRES) can support a diverse, and often abundant, terrestrial and semi-aquatic invertebrate (TSAI) fauna. Steward et al. review the TSAI literature that has increased substantially over the last decade and present conceptual models describing how TSAIs respond to hydrological changes in IRES. They also test these models with data collected during wet and dry phases in IRES from Australia and France.
 
Bálint Pernecker
added an update
The first call for DRYvER Short-Term Scientific Mission (STSM) is now open! STSMs fund mobility for young researchers (MSc, PhD, PostDoc) to perform activities related to DRYvER.
With the help of STSMs young researchers can visit DRYvER’s partner institutions to benefit from the host’s different technologies, analytical skills, knowledge/expertise, and methods, which are not available at their home institution. STSMs also aim to foster and facilitate collaborations within DRYvER’s partner institutions, by promoting mutual benefit towards joint publications and developing follow-up research proposals.
The first call for DRYvER STSM is open between 07 February 2022 and 14 March 2022. In order to be the safest from COVID point of view, the first call would support STSMs planned in the summer period, i.e., between 01 June 2022 and 30 September 2022.
Important deadline for sending all application documents: 14 March 2022, 24:00 (UTC). The DRYvER Steering Committee and the leaders of the Forum of Young Researchers (FYR) will evaluate the applications and will notify the applicants of the results until 04 April 2022, 24:00 (UTC). Last day for the implementation of the STSMs in the first call: 30 September 2022.
For more information and application, please visit https://www.dryver.eu/about/fyr.
 
Bálint Pernecker
added an update
A postdoc position in freshwater ecology in DRYvER is open at the Department of Botany and Zoology, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czechia. The application deadline is 24/01/2022. For more information and application, visit https://euraxess.cz/jobs/721495.
Edit: The application deadline has been extended to 24/01/2022.
 
Bálint Pernecker
added an update
Sarremejane et al. review the current understanding, knowledge gaps and research directions for investigating ecohydrological responses to droughts in Intermittent Rivers and Ephemeral Streams (IRES).
 
Bálint Pernecker
added an update
Cid et al. propose adoption of a meta-system approach, where regional processes acting at different levels of ecological organization – populations, communities, and ecosystems – are integrated into conventional river conservation, restoration, and biomonitoring. They also describe a series of measurements and indicators that could be assimilated into the implementation of relevant biodiversity and environmental policies. Finally, they highlight the need for alternative management strategies that can guide practitioners toward applying recent advances in ecology to preserve and restore river ecosystems and the ecosystem services they provide, in the context of increasing alteration of river network connectivity worldwide
 
François Munoz
added a research item
River networks are among Earth’s most threatened hot-spots of biodiversity and provide key ecosystem services (e.g., supply drinking water and food, climate regulation) essential to sustaining human well-being. Climate change and increased human water use are causing more rivers and streams to dry, with devastating impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem services. Currently, more than a half of the global river networks consist of drying channels, and these are expanding dramatically. However, drying river networks (DRNs) have received little attention from scientists and policy makers, and the public is unaware of their importance. Consequently, there is no effective integrated biodiversity conservation or ecosystem management strategy of DRNs. A multidisciplinary team of 25 experts from 11 countries in Europe, South America, China and the USA will build on EU efforts to assess the cascading effects of climate change on biodiversity, ecosystem functions and ecosystem services of DRNs through changes in flow regimes and water use. DRYvER (DRYing riVER networks) will gather and upscale empirical and modelling data from nine focal DRNs (case studies) in Europe (EU) and Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC) to develop a meta-system framework applicable to Europe and worldwide. It will also generate crucial knowledge- based strategies, tools and guidelines for economically-efficient adaptive management of DRNs. Working closely with stakeholders and end-users, DRYvER will co-develop strategies to mitigate and adapt to climate change impacts in DRNs, integrating hydrological, ecological (including nature-based solutions), socio-economic and policy perspectives. The end results of DRYvER will contribute to reaching the objectives of the Paris Agreement and placing Europe at the forefront of research on climate change.
Bálint Pernecker
added an update
The third DRYvER releated article was published by Crabot et al. in Ecography. They highlight the taxonomic and functional responses of aquatic macroinvertebrate communities to flow intermittence across river networks from three continents, to test predictions from underlying trait-based conceptual theory. Their research highlights the need for the conservation of natural drying regimes of intermittent rivers to secure their ecological integrity.
 
Bálint Pernecker
added an update
Blackman et al. states that novel genomic tools based on high-throughput sequencing have the potential to tackle unanswered questions of pivotal importance to predict future change in IRES. They outline why genomic tools are needed to assess these dynamic ecosystems from the population to the metacommunity scale, and their potential role in bridging ecological–evolutionary dynamics.
 
Bálint Pernecker
added an update
The first DRYvER releated article has been published! A new study led by researchers from McGill University and INRAE found that between 51-60% of the 64 million kilometres of rivers and streams on Earth that they investigated stop flowing periodically, or run dry for part of the year. Leveraging global information on the hydrology, climate, geology and surrounding land cover of the Earth’s river network, the article shows that non-perennial rivers occur within all climates and biomes, and on every continent. The findings challenge the assumptions underpinning foundational river concepts across scientific disciplines. This calls for a paradigm shift to understand and adequately manage the world’s flowing waters, their biodiversity and functional integrity.
 
Bálint Pernecker
added an update
WP3 participants are opening two postdoctoral positions. Please find more information on these in the attached .pdf files.
1) Generating and calibrating metamodels of carbon function dynamics in Drying River Networks. This postdoctoral project aims at developing a spatially-explicit, dynamic meta-ecosystem model for DRNs, and it is offered by the Catalan Institute for Water Research (ICRA, Spain). The successful applicant will be based at INRAE, Lyon, France, in the EcoFlowS team.
2) Modelling greenhouse gases from Drying River Networks. The aim is to produce climate-driven scenarios of GHG emissions for six DRNs and then to upscale them at the European scale. The successful applicant will be based at the Laboratory of Alpine Ecology (LECA, Grenoble Alpes University) in Grenoble, France.
 
Marko Miliša
added an update
A call for a position within the project is now open. See attached flyer.
 
Zoltán Csabai
added a project goal
DRYvER is a Horizon 2020 project, which aims to collect, analyse and model data from nine drying river networks in Europe and South America to create a novel global meta-system approach that incorporates hydrology, socio-economics, ecology and biogeochemistry in order to craft strategies, tools and recommendations for adaptive management of river networks. Working in collaboration with resource managers and citizens, the DRYvER team plans to co-develop new strategies to mitigate and adapt to the effects of climate change on these networks by integrating quantitative and qualitative perspectives, including nature-based solutions with a strong socio-economic and legislative component.