Project

DRAPES - Design, Research and Practice in Educational Spaces

Goal: DRAPES is an European network, consisting of a group of multi-disciplinary scholars, interested in educational spaces. The group is working on different projects related to the topic and present their results in national and European conferences.

Updates
0 new
3
Recommendations
0 new
2
Followers
0 new
84
Reads
8 new
1631

Project log

Bodil Hovaldt Bøjer
added a research item
Based on an empirical case study, this chapter puts forward the thesis that in order for an innovative learning environment (ILE) to work as intended, three things must be aligned: teaching (the teacher), space (the designer) and organisation (the school management). Ideally, when designing new ILEs all three factors are considered in the design process in order to ensure a common goal: creating the best space for innovative learning. In reality, this rarely happens and the users are left with a physical learning environment where the intentions do not always match educators’ expectations and established practices. To remedy this dilemma, the chapter proposes an additional activation phase in the design process after implementation—that is, the early use phase of a new build—where the intentions of the space are translated into actions, and refinements negotiated through discussions with the users through a participatory process. The purpose of this phase is to match pedagogies with spatial possibilities. The methodology used is Research through Design.
Lisa Rosén Rasmussen
added a research item
Focusing on the school corridor, this article explores the coming into being of Danish school space through shifting architectural designs, teaching practices, and volumes and organisations of pupils’ bodies. The analysis shows a transformation of the corridor itself: from primarily being a disciplining and potentially dangerous space for moving across and between different contexts, school corridors become stimulating spaces for active learning. Thereby, the child’s schooling and bodily movements, as well as meaning-making about where and how school is supposed to take place, are altered. The article draws on Karen Barad’s theory of agential realism to analyse guidance material on how to design, decorate, and use school buildings and a number of spearhead schools at the cutting edge of various trends within school architecture from the second half of the twentieth century until the present day. Through this theoretical lens, the article explores the material and discursive coming into being of the corridor as a space of potential, the transformations of the relationship between the corridor and the classroom, and, finally, the emergence of the corridor as a learning space.
Anneli Frelin
added a research item
This study explores students’ photo story input into how to create a safe and sustainable educational environment. Digital photo stories were collected through classroom assignments at a secondary school in Sweden and the software Microsoft Sway. The students made use of photos and texts to describe what they regarded as safe and unsafe places and places that supported or impeded their learning. The results show variations both in the areas that the students viewed as safe and unsafe and the reasons for their choice of area. This means that one area can be depicted as safe or positive by one student, but unsafe or negative by another, which was also the case regarding learning.
Ulrike Stadler-Altmann
added a research item
The academic world of research, in particular, can be seen as ''a sea of words and more words, in which visually based communication [is] not taken as serious intellectual products'' (Collier 2001, p. 59). Furthermore, scientific texts are often written in an elaborate language which is particularly difficult to understand for students and novices in research. A visual method seems to facilitate access to research, especially for students who first need to develop a scientific research habit. Therefore, the present study uses the participatory, image-based method of diamond ranking, to facilitate a more accessible approach to research in educational science. Diamond ranking is a recognised thinking skills tool which is designed to facilitate talk and encourage people to consider their own value positions on a given topic (Clark, 2012). With respect to research into learning environments, the use of photographs in a diamond ranking activity resonates extraordinary well with people as it explicitly encourages them to consider their relationship to the physical space and how it influences their beliefs about learning and teaching (e.g. Woolner et al. 2010). This study therefore has two objectives: to show how students can learn to assess learning environments, before moving to analyse students' preferences for certain learning environments based on the resulting products.
Bodil Hovaldt Bøjer
added a research item
The chapter discusses how co-design can contribute to interprofessional collaboration between designers, teachers and students in order to support the development and use of hybrid learning spaces in primary education. The creation and use of a hybrid learning space involves the development and entanglement of new pedagogical practices and physical spaces that differ from traditional educational set-tings in order to embrace the coexistence and entanglement of multiple dimen-sions. We argue that co-design can be used to engage users and creators in inter-professional collaboration of the space-practice relationship in a real-life context. The teacher’s role is of vital importance for a hybrid learning space to be success-ful in primary education, however, the teacher profession is historically not equipped to integrate physical spaces as part of professional reflections and judgement. Thus, it is essential that the teachers develop understanding and competences to use the space as a pedagogical tool so their practices can be driven by professional methods and reflections. In this chapter, we discuss teacher professionalism, the relation to physical spaces and how to engage teachers in hybrid learning spaces.
Anneli Frelin
added a research item
Teaching in new kinds of learning environments could prove challenging, and a successful transition is facilitated by user involvement. This article reports results from the planning and rebuilding phase of a multi-zone flexible learning environment. On two occasions, one virtual and one on-site walk-through, two groups of secondary school teachers conducted pre-occupancy evaluations, indicating possibilities, challenges and activities in the four zones visited. Analyses of their perceptions of affordances, inspired by Gibson, indicated two kinds of material affordances: organisational and educational. Organisational affordances had a major influence on the kinds of educational activities that were described. Rather than coming up with new types of activities, it seemed as though their pre-occupation evaluation of the flexible learning environment made teachers consider new ways of organising the existing activities. An analytical model, TEALE, illustrating teachers’ evaluations of learning environments is introduced, and further research on organisational dimensions of learning environments is suggested.
Anneli Frelin
added a research item
Prior research shows that creating innovative learning spaces that work well for pupils and teachers is a challenge which implicates different stakeholders. The aim of this article is to inquire into how educational visions evolve and are expressed through the different phases of two school design processes as well as visualize how stakeholders’ roles in the processes result in innovative learning environments and practices that work well. The data consists of photographs from school visits, briefs, and interviews. The material is analyzed with a particular focus on educational vision, organization, and working methods. An analytical model showing the stakeholders’ levels of participation at each stage is revised and developed. The results indicate four common themes: Continuity (several stakeholders involved in more than one phase); Preparation (processes were long-term, continuous, and iterative, with future users testing and evaluating prototypes and other innovative interior design elements to be used in the new spaces); Alignment (early and extensive considerations of the school’s organization and working methods); and Participation (multi-professional teams with representation of a pedagogical perspective at the higher levels of participation). From this, it can be concluded that achieving robust, innovative learning environments involves stakeholders’ regard to the aspects of knowledge, education, organization, and economy.
Ulrike Stadler-Altmann
added a research item
Recent research on schoolyards demonstrate that these environments a substantial role for the teaching and learning aspects of education (see Woolner& Stadler-Altmann, 2021; Stadler-Altmann, 2016).Nevertheless, academic inquiries into schoolyards have rarely incorporated the perspectives of students and teachers. Mainly, the activities of students during the breaks for recreation (see Powell et al., 2016), as well as possibilities for movement (e.g. Stanley et al. 2012) for students have been examined. The teachers' perspective has only been studied in educational policy discourses (see Larsson, 2013) and in questions of supervision and control of students during breaks. Our paperexaminesthe student's view onschoolyards and outdoor areas: approximately 8.000 students completed a questionnaire during2005-2011 about the satisfaction with, and the importance of, their schoolyard. The students also described their activities there.Our data made it obvious, that students prefer schoolyards with different zones of action and silence, public and private. These results differ in primary and secondary school students and in a gender perspective.We also surveyed 360 teachers about size, equipment, and design of their schoolyards. Both surveys provided distinct insights which did not completely correlate with one another. The aim of our paper is to highlight what transformational processes can take place in schoolyards and outdoor areas, considering that they are educational spaces. Based on the perspective of students and teachers, we develop fundamental ideas for the educational design and usage of schoolyards as an important area of school development and ascertain the need for further research in this field. Introduction: School building-Schoolyard-School surrounding The term "schoolyard" generally describes all areas, which are used by students or by school staff in their free time or for lectures. Mostly these flat areas are near the school building, fenced and not open for the community. The size of schoolyard depends on the school type and the school location: In primary school we often find bigger schoolyards as in secondary schools. Schools in rural areas usually have more space for their schoolyards while schools in towns have often very small schoolyards. Althoughprogressive movements of the late nineteenth century in school architecture can be observed, traditional school buildings and traditional schoolyardsconstitute the majority:these schoolyards are flat, without equipment for learning or playing, fenced and with only small amounts of vegetation.This organisation suggests that most of these playgrounds were planned as spaces for the breaks between lessons (for more details, see Buddensiek, 2008; Montag Stiftung, 2011). Current Situation Recent developments in our society have led to a reduction of open space available to children and adolescents within and around residential areas. They spend much of their time in school, in class or in after-school programs. Physical inactivity and an inactive lifestyle are common risk factors for health, even during childhood (see Möhrle et al, 2015). Against the background of health problems, lack of social competencies, increasing aggressive behaviour and weaknesses in motor-driven and coordinative skills of our children, the quality of schoolyards areeven more important. The planning and designing of schoolyards are fundamental in order to connect the pedagogical processes practiced indoors, with the pedagogical possibilities outdoors, but the transference of these processes isdeficient in most cases. Neither school-facility maintainers, planning architects nor teachers are aware of the importance of schoolyards for the students' everyday school life, for social learning and recreation. Most of the time, schoolyards are only places used for the purpose of supply or disposal. Pedagogical relevance of school building and schoolyard School buildings and schoolyards are physical surroundings which are used in a daily routine. Nevertheless, school buildings and schoolyards also fulfil basic needs. Steele mentions(1973) that the physical environment can influence the way teachers and students feel, think and behave. Following his considerations, Weinstein (2007, 2011) argues that five of Steele's functions are especially important for teaching and learning:
Lisa Rosén Rasmussen
added a research item
This article addresses schoolteachers’ spatial work in the process of inhabiting and using a new school building. The study focuses on a historical case of a Danish open-plan school built in the early 1970s and shows how the teachers’ spatial work engages with questions of the organisation of bodies, sound, furniture and teaching aids. The article uses Tim Ingold’s notion of making – stressing the making of architecture, as well as pedagogy, as a continuous and never-ending process – and Karen Barad’s theory of agential realism to explore the teachers’ spatial work as part of the intra-actions of and mutual coming into being of school space, pedagogical ideas, teachers and pupils. Finally, the article analyses the transnational entanglements of the teachers’ spatial work through a discussion of the open-plan school as an architectural and pedagogical model found across the globe.
Bodil Hovaldt Bøjer
added a research item
This PhD thesis addresses the challenges of designing new learning spaces where the spatial design and pedagogical practices align. The point of departure for the thesis is the assumption that the relationship between learning space design and pedagogical practice is a constant and dynamic interplay, where each part affects the other. This understanding builds on current learning space research with a relationalist perspective and is inspired by Actor Network Theory (ANT). The particular contribution of this thesis to the research field is that it explores and discusses the interplay between learning space design and pedagogical practice with a specific focus on the design process. The main focal point is the significance and potential of using participatory design processes and methods to inform the relationship between space and practice—both before, during and after the design and implementation of a new learning space. Hence, the thesis contributes to current research as well as current practice in the designing of learning environments for children and youths in primary and secondary schools, while insights also relate to other learning environments in e.g. libraries and universities. The potential of participatory design processes and tools in aligning learning space design and pedagogical practices is explored in three practice-based design experiments. The methodological approach in these experiments builds on constructive design research and employs a programmatic approach to design research in which design experiments are the core of the project. Thus, the empirical research has been conducted as three design experiments in two Danish schools, where design processes and design methods have been explored in a participatory context with school management, teachers and students.
Ulrike Stadler-Altmann
added a research item
Heterotopien, sind nach Foucault (1967/1993) Räume, reale Orte lokali-sierter Utopie, in der alle anderen Räume einer Kultur zugleich repräsen-tiert, bestritten oder umgekehrt werden. Diese Perspektive wird auf die Räume der Erziehung und Bildung, genauer auf den Schulraum bezogen. Anhand von Beispielen aus der erziehungswissenschaftlichen Körper- und Raumforschung wird verdeutlicht wie Raum und Körper zwischen idealer (Schul-) Kultur und realer (Schul-) Unkultur sichtbar werden. Im ersten Teil werden forschungsmethodische Zugänge der Pädagogi-schen Anthropologie genutzt, um Körperpraktiken von Kindern, Jugendli-chen und Erwachsenen im schulischen Raum zu interpretieren bzw. dis-kursiv zu verhandeln. Das Potenzial einer in der Pädagogischen Anthropo-logie fundierten Forschungsperspektive wird hierbei genutzt, um mögliche Dimensionen des Körperlichen in der Schule zu beschreiben. Die For-schungsperspektiven der empirischen Schul- und Unterrichtsforschung lassen sich so erweitern, da in dieser Perspektive Schulräume zumeist als Medium des Lehrens und Lernens erfasst werden. Daran anschließend wird der Raum als gebaute Lehr-Lernumgebung aus der Perspektive der empirischen Schul- und Unterrichtsforschung vorgestellt und erläutert, wie Schulgebäude und Klassenzimmer als Aus-druck eines Erziehungs- und Bildungsziels erfasst, analysiert und gedeutet werden können. Forschungsperspektivisch lässt sich die anthropologische Zentrierung durch die Hinzunahme der Bedeutung von Materialität erwei-tern. Geteilter Betrachtungszusammenhang ist die an Foucault angelehnte Denkfigur der Schule als Heterotopie. Entsprechend kann eine Heterotopie des Lehrens und Lernens an der Grenze zwischen pädagogischer Wissens-theorie und –praxis beschrieben werden und der Wert der realisierten Uto-pie, des Schulorts als Manifestation der ihn umgebenden Kultur in Erinne-rung gerufen werden.
Ulrike Stadler-Altmann
added 2 research items
Siamo di fronte a una grande sfida insieme educativa e architettonica, ovvero quella di progettare edifici destinato alla formazione del nostro futuro. Con questo libro presentiamo un discorso articolato e interdisciplinare sul tema “Pedagogia – Architettura – Design: PROGETTARE SCUOLE INSIEME”, a cui è stato dedicato un convegno e un ciclo di seminari nel 2017-2018 e che prosegue tutt’ora con una mostra itinerante interattiva. È in gioco una grande responsabilità che coinvolge tutti. Intrecciando le ricerche sul tema, interrogando esperti del mondo progettuale e di quello dell’educazione e presentando una proposta sperimentata di progettazione condivisa, il nostro impegno è stato quello di fare il punto su possibili traiettorie di lavoro. Ulrike Stadler-Altmann, professore ordinario di Didattica e Beate Weyland, professore associato di Didattica presso la Libera Università di Bolzano, hanno curato gli aspetti pedagogico-didattici. Alessandra Galletti, dottore di ricerca in Tecnologia dell’Architettura e Kuno Prey, professore ordinario di Product Design presso la Libera Università di Bolzano, hanno seguito le questioni progettuali e di design. L’intreccio straordinario tra pensieri e punti di vista diversi sullo stesso prezioso oggetto, che è la scuola, ha generato un terreno di sperimentazione e di ricerca frizzante e dinamico.
Anna Kristín Sigurðardóttir
added a research item
A recent shift in the design of school buildings in Iceland is apparent, from a conventional classroom setting to a more open and flexible learning environment. The aim of the project related here is to take a close look at this development by identifying significant design features and how they have changed over time to reflect educational policy and affect educational practice. Environmental and architectonic features characterising both older and recently designed school buildings at the primary and lower secondary level are examined in light of challenges involving architecture, educational ideology, school governance and teaching practice. Data was collected by interviews, observations and photography at 20 school sites, review of policy and technical documents, drawings and writings. The school buildings are grouped into three main categories based on their overall design: a traditional design pattern with classrooms of similar sizes along corridors, a cluster design pattern with two or more classrooms with adjacent spaces grouped together and arranged to form units within the school as a whole and finally an open plan design pattern with extended learning spaces for large groups of students and teacher teams. The first design form has prevailed for a long time and is seen by many as the dominant venue for conventional school practice, while the two latter and most recent design forms have been developed to encourage a more dynamic and democratic approach to teaching and learning.
Ulrike Stadler-Altmann
added 2 research items
An overview of educational research on the influence of the constructed environment on educational practice is starting this paper: At first, some aspects for the evaluation of learning environment are presented, followed by two sections about school space and classroom space to show the importance of school buildings and classroom settings for teaching and learning processes. A focus is set on the coherency of the constructed school environment and the resultant challenges that occur for teaching and learning. Finally, further research questions are developed in the perspective of educational science and architectural psychology. All inizio del presente saggio, viene presentata una panoramica della letter-atura scientifica che indaga l influenza dell'ambiente di apprendimento negli insegnanti e negli studenti. Innanzitutto vengono presentate alcune sfide che riguardano la valutazione degli ambienti di apprendimento e successivamente viene delineata l'im-portanza generale dell'edificio scolastico e dell'aula per la scuola e l'istruzione. Il focus risiede nell evidenziare l interazione esistente tra l'ambiente di ap-prendimento formale e le sfide dell'insegnamento e dell'apprendimento. Questa interazione viene illustrata attraverso i risultati di studi empirici e, in conclusione, vengono proposte prospettive di ricerca future nel campo dell Educazione e della Psicologia ambientale e architettonica.
In erfolgreichen, guten Schulen werden Lehren und Lernen durch die bauliche Umgebung bestmöglich unterstützt – aus Schul- und Lernräumen sollten also Lebensräume werden. Um dies zu erreichen müssen erziehungswissenschaftliche, architekturpsychologische und architektonische Ansprüche in Einklang gebracht werden. Die AutorInnen nähern sich dem Thema der pädagogischen Schulraumgestaltung aus ihren jeweiligen Disziplinen und eröffnen Wege für eine optimalen Schul- und Klassenzimmergestaltung. Die AutorInnen des Bandes nehmen der die Bedeutung der Schulhaus- und Klassenzimmerarchitektur für Lehr- und Lernprozesse aus internationaler Perspektive in den Blick. Die Gestaltung des Schulhauses und des Klassenzimmers werden dabei als gebaute Lernumgebung betrachtet und diese Betrachtung wird im Dialog zwischen Erziehungswissenschaftlern, Architekturpsychologen, Architekten und Lehrkräften vorangetrieben. Ausgehend von einem Überblick über die theoretische und empirische Forschung zu Schulgebäuden und Klassenzimmern im Zusammenhang mit Lehren und Lernen tragen die AutorInnen Ergebnisse aus den differierenden Forschungstraditionen zusammen. Dadurch kann die Bedeutung der gebauten Umgebung auf Lehr-Lernprozesse nachgezeichnet werden. Neben den Möglichkeiten zur Evaluation von Zusammenhängen zwischen Gestaltung der gebauten Lernumgebung, Lehren und Lernen werden auch neuere Forschungsmethoden diskutiert, die die Beteiligten im Designprozess von Schulhäusern und Klassenzimmern einbeziehen. Weitere Ergebnisse aus der erziehungswissenschaftlichen Forschung illustrieren, wie Lehrkräfte, SchülerInnen mit ihrem Klassenzimmer, ihrer Schule umgehen. International anerkannte ArchitektInnen aus Deutschland, Amerika und Portugal thematisieren, wie Lehren und Lernen durch architektonische Planungen gezielt unterstützt werden kann. Architekturpsychologische und phänomenologische Betrachtungen runden die Gesamtschau auf den Gegenstand ab. Die Multiperspektivität der Beiträge ermöglicht es zum einen, die jeweiligen fachwissenschaftlichen Diskurse nachzuvollziehen, und zum anderen sich ein umfassendes Bild zu Lehren und Lernen in der gebauten Umgebung zu machen, sowie Ideen und Ansatzpunkt für zukünftige Forschung und Gestaltung von Schulgebäuden und Klassen weiterzuentwickeln. Die Herausgeberin: Prof. Dr. Ulrike Stadler-Altmann, Ordinaria für Allgemeine Didaktik/Schulpädagogik an der Bildungswissenschaftlichen Fakultät der Freien Universität Bozen
Ulrike Stadler-Altmann
added a research item
Comparison is an essential research method (see Morlino 2018) in educational research. We use comparison as an academic instrument to grasp its necessity and its effective purpose for research on school buildings. Based on school visits in Iceland, Italy and UK we – the interdisciplinary research group DRAPES (Design, Research and Practice in Educational Spaces) – discuss the research method of comparison in an interdisciplinary way (see Könings et al. 2017) and in a team of educational researchers, architects and sociologists. We develop instruments for comparing school buildings and explain the importance of well-designed school buildings for inclusion and exclusion in teaching and learning. The case studies of the school visits give us the opportunity to compare and to reflect on these challenges, finding common ideas, methods and solutions. One result of these is the shared belief that teachers and students need a more democratic and humanistic learning space. The space is a necessary precondition to fulfil future goals in school policies, teaching and learning and pedagogical practices (see Stadler-Altmann, 2015), such as the challenge for schools to be inclusive schools. Visiting an Icelandic school (in 2015) designed by Bruce Jilk we develop our aims of shared exploration and understanding, in passing reflecting on the value of a 'study trip' as a methodology. We would reflect on the architecture, particularly in relation to the built results of recent school building programmes in Portugal and the UK. We also tried to develop a method to compare a school and the observed practice for further interdisciplinary research projects. The visit to Italy (South Tyrol) in 2016 introduced the research team to an interesting policy of planning schools from kindergarten to high school around a particular pedagogy, either renovating old school or developing new buildings to support this pedagogy. Considering that each school is a specific universe, South Tyrol promoted a participatory process for each school project with architects, pedagogist, school leaders, teachers and parents. Our developed research method for interdisciplinary research is practiced here, as a possibility of shared impressions, discussions and development of school through designing physical learning environment. Visiting schools in Newcastle, UK and surrounding area in 2017, we describe and analyse the situation of using school building in an innovative practise without the possibility to rebuild or to renovate them. As a comparison, we show the functional use of well-designed school buildings in Iceland, Italy (South Tyrol) and UK. Based on different educational and architectural perspectives we highlight aspects of good design for school buildings, the policy behind it, how people use it and its effects on educational practices. The complexity of the interaction of policies, practice and people in school is notable, but also evident is the important role schools, classrooms and schoolyards play in facilitating successful teaching and learning (see Sigurðardóttir & Hjartarson, 2016). We articulate some interdisciplinary and intercultural lessons from school visits across Europe to school buildings that, through their design, support a new culture of teaching and learning and the opportunity to become an inclusive school. References Benade, L.; Jackson, M. (eds). (2017), Transforming education: Design, technology, government, Wiesbaden: Springer VS. Grosvenor, I, & Rasmussen, L. R. (eds). (in press). Making Education: Governance by design. Springer Könings KD, Bovill C, Woolner P. (2017). Towards an interdisciplinary model of practice for participatory building design in education. European Journal of Education, 52(3) Morlino, L. (2018), Comparison. A methodological introduction for the social sciences, Opladen, Berlin, Toronto: Barbara Budrich. Sigurðardóttir, AK. & Hjartarson, T. (2016). The idea and reality of an innovative school. From inventive design to established practice in a new school building. Improving schools, 19(1), 62–79. doi:10.1177/1365480215612173 Sigurðardóttir, A.K., & Hjartarson, T. (2011). School buildings for the 21st century. Some features of new school buildings in Iceland. CEPS Journal, 1(2), 25–43. Stadler-Altmann, U.; Hilger, P. (2017), Transferring Pedagogical Spaces – Schoolyards as learning environments in the perspective of students and teachers, in: Benade, L.; Jackson, M. (ed.), Transforming education: Design, technology, government, Wiesbaden: Spinger VS, p. 227-244. Stadler-Altmann, U. (ed). (2016) (Hrsg.), Lernumgebungen. Erziehungswissenschaftliche Perspektiven auf Schulgebäude und Klassenzimmer [Learning Environment. Educational and Architectual Perspectives], Opladen, Berlin, Toronto: Barbara Budrich. Stadler-Altmann, U. (2015), The Influence of School and Classroom Space on Education, in: C. Rubie-Davies, J. M. Stephens, & P. Watson (Eds.), The Routledge International Handbook of Social Psychology of the Classroom, London: Routledge, p. 252-262. Thomson, P. and Hall, C. (2016) Place-Based Methods for Researching Schools, London: Bloomsbury. Woolner, P. (in press) Collaborative re-design: working with school communities to understand and improve their learning environments In R. Ellis and P.Goodyear (Eds) Spaces of Teaching and Learning, Springer Woolner, P. and Clark, A. (2015) Developing shared understandings of learning environments: interactions with students, teachers and other professionals In P.Woolner (ed) School Design Together. Abingdon: Routledge Woolner, P. (ed). (2015), School Design Together, Routledge; USA.
Anneli Frelin
added a research item
Teachers collaborate with various professionals within the educational environment. Traditionally, there has been a physical division of labour symbolized by the classroom door, meaning that teachers have mainly operated in the classroom and other professions, such as special educators and school guidance counsellors have worked in other areas in the school. Open learning environments (OLE) remove this clear physical division and calls for new professional challenges and opportunities. The aim of this paper is to examine how two groups of education professionals, teachers and so called social pedagogues (para-professionals working with social aspects of students’ school environment) perceive their roles and negotiate the relationships and spaces in a newly built OLE school. The analysis is inspired by sociomaterial perspectives (Fenwick, Edwards & Sawchuck, 2011; Mulcahy, Cleveland & Aberton, 2015), using the analytical concept professional territory, which consists of the school staff's conceived task perception, the social transaction and the appropriated physical space where interaction takes place (Biesta & Burbules, 2003; Grannäs & Frelin, online). A case study was conducted in a newly built OLE school. The four floor building contained a circular entrée lounge surrounded by eight departments: larger sections divided into various types of spaces in which around 90 students had most of their classes. The staffing of each section consisted of three teachers and one social pedagogue. Three school visits and four interviews with two primary teachers and two social pedagogues were conducted. Questions focused on task perception, professional collaboration and spatial/material aspects of work such as usage of spaces. Examples of results: Conceived professional territories: In the first year in operation of the OLE school, the teachers and social pedagogues have had to negotiate their roles continuously, as situations have emerged. This regards for example the matter of who should “check in” the students in the department in the morning. Appropriated physical professional territory: The social pedagogues had the responsibility for most situations outside of the department, whereas within the department they circulated in the same manner as the teacher but with a focus on social rather than academic issues. Social professional territory: Social pedagogues’ transactions with students were according to them only in teaching capacities a) during seat work, as “police” or as sounding boards for student reflection, or b) during an already occurring conflict situation upon arrival, “holding the fort” until the teacher had sorted it out. OLEs require flexibility and collaboration among staff.
Ulrike Stadler-Altmann
added an update
Just an overview:
Who we are - what we reserach
 
Anna Kristín Sigurðardóttir
added a project reference
Ulrike Stadler-Altmann
added 6 research items
At school, inside and outside spaces, defining an educational milieu, are important for teaching and learning, for students’ and teachers’ well-being and motivation in class. These are all important factors for successful teaching and learning. Even outdoor space and schoolyards may have such an influence. It is necessary to involve students and their views of educational space in any school spatial design and planning process. We examine students’ views on schoolyards and outdoor areas. Approximately 8.000 students completed questionnaires between 2005 and 2011 regarding their satisfaction with, and their understanding of the importance of their schoolyards. The students also described their activities there. We found that students prefer schoolyards with differentiated zones of action and silence, correlating with spaces defined as public and private. These results differ between primary and secondary school students and further between girls and boys. We also surveyed approximately 360 teachers with a questionnaire concerning size, equipment and design of schoolyards. Although we could not match the data of the two surveys, we could find related and interesting convergences. In considering that schoolyards and outdoor areas around schools are important educational and recreational spaces for students and teachers, the aim of this chapter is to highlight transforming processes in the use of schoolyards. Based on the perspectives of students and teachers, we aim to show key notions for the educational design and use of schoolyards as a possibility for school development, and for further research in this field.
Ulrike Stadler-Altmann
added an update
Convegno e mostra laboratorio
Direzione scientifica del convegno: Beate Weyland & Ulrike Stadler-Altmann
Curatori della mostra laboratorio: Beate Weyland & Kuno Prey & Paolo Bellenzier
Progettare una scuola è molto di più che pianificare la nascita di un edificio. Significa progettare per un futuro in cui si specchia la comunità cittadina o paesana, immaginare un luogo di incontro e di scambio per le generazioni che verranno, significa in fondo pensare compiutamente a quale ruolo giocherà la scuola nella vita delle persone, coinvolgendo insieme alle riflessioni pedagogico-didattiche una lettura politica, sociale, economica, culturale.http://pad.events.unibz.it/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/2017-09-11_Ordine-Architetti.jpg
È ormai da tempo che si studiano modalità di coinvolgimento di insegnanti, bambini e ragazzi, collaboratori amministrativi, genitori e rappresentanti della committenza in processi partecipativi, al fine di dare voce a un progetto condiviso per l’educazione e la formazione. In collaborazione con gli architetti possono nascere scuole orientate al futuro.
Il convegno e la mostra laboratorio intendono fare il punto della situazione sul tema e offrire esperienze, metodi e strumenti alla comunità scolastica, ai progettisti e alla committenza per progettare nuovi scenari per la scuola insieme.
Gli eventi sono organizzati dalla Facoltà di Scienze della Formazione in collaborazione con la rete inter-istituzionale altoatesina Spazio & Apprendimento.
 
Ulrike Stadler-Altmann
added an update
Tagung und interaktive Werkausstellung
Schulen zu entwerfen umfasst mehr als das Planen eines Gebäudes. Es geht vielmehr um die Gestaltung einer Zukunft. In einem Schulgebäude als Begegnungsort zwischen den Generationen spiegelt sich die städtische bzw. dörfliche Gemeinschaft und die Bedeutung der Schule im Alltagsleben. Politische, soziale, ökonomische und kulturelle Perspektiven verbinden sich mit pädagogisch-didaktischen Überlegungen und es entsteht eine Schule, die gemeinsam geplant und gemeinsam genutzt wird.
Der partizipative Ansatz, gemeinsam Schule zu planen, ermöglicht es allen an Bildungsprozessen Beteiligten – Lehrpersonen, Schülerinnen & Schülern, Mitarbeitende, Eltern, Gemeindeverterter – sich einzubringen und Schulgebäude als Ausdruck einer geteilten Idee von Erziehung und Bildung zu bauen. In Kooperationen mit Architekten entstehen so zukunftsfähige Schulen.
Die Fachtagung und die interaktive Ausstellung zeigen den aktuellen Stand eines von erziehungswissenschaftlichen Ansätzen inspirierten Schulbaus. Erfahrungen, Ideen und erprobte Methoden ermöglichen Interssierten einen Zugang zum erweiterten Konzept «Schule Gemeinsam Planen».
Die Veranstaltungen werden von der Fakultät für Bildungswissenschaften zusamment mit dem inter-institutionellen Südtiroler Netzwerk Lernen und Raum organisiert.
 
Gonçalo Canto Moniz
added a project reference
Lars Emmerik Damgaard Knudsen
added a research item
The ways the relationship between theory and practice is understood and implemented in study programmes is a question that has been posed since antiquity, and that the Bologna process and the reform of the professional bachelor programme problem have intensified also in Denmark. Professional bachelor programmes have become increasingly abstract, and the individual educational institutions have been merged into university colleges [Undervisningsministeriet (2007). Bekendtgørelse om uddannelsen til professionsbachelor som lærer i folkeskolen. BEK nr 219 af 12/03/2007. Ministry of Education. Proclamation of Professional Bachelor Teacher Education Programme. Retrieved May 2014 from, https://www.retsinformation.dk/Forms/R0710.aspx?id=25302]. In this article, we reflect on the epistemological challenges we faced during a research project on the correlation between theory and practice and drop-out rates at four professional bachelor programmes in Denmark. Our point of departure was to view theory and practice as across time and place. But the contrasts among the four programmes made it clear to us that the various understandings of the relations between theory and practice that we observed had to be seen as mixed cultural practices undergoing a process of change. The concepts of theory and practice, the places, the academic content and teaching methods, and knowledge forms we observed were mutually interdependent, and fought for recognition as central to the way in which professional bachelor programmes were reproduced and transformed. In this article, we use the comprehensive transformation processes of professional bachelor programmes as reasons for reframing/restating questions regarding theory and practice in which theory and practice are viewed as cultural forms in education and professional practice. We suggest an actual didactics of theory-practice as part of professional bachelor programme practice for lecturers, students and supervisors.
Pam Woolner
added 6 research items
School premises make a difference to learning, but it is important to understand the relationship between setting and educational activities. Physical space has been found to entrench practice, making it harder to reflect and make changes. Yet changes made to the physical environment may not lead to changes in teaching or learning. This may be understood theoretically in terms of levels of participation, and many school design practitioners advocate active participation of school communities in the processes of change. This article considers two case studies of teachers and learners engaging with their physical school learning environment. The overview of responses and outcomes generated by these two studies enables the identification of central issues for effective participatory approaches to the learning environment.
This paper reports on a literature review conducted in the UK for the Design Council and CfBT (Higgins et al., 2005) which looked at the evidence of the impact of environments on learning in schools. We have reviewed the available evidence regarding different facets of the physical environment and provided an analysis based on different areas of effect, including the extent to which different facets interact (positively and negatively) with one another. Our conclusions suggest that, although the research often indicates the parameters of an effective environment, there is an overall lack of empirical evidence about the impact of individual elements of the physical environment which might inform school design at a practical level to support student achievement. However, at a secondary level of analysis, there are indications that environmental change can be part of a catalytic process of school development and improvement. The implications of these findings for Building Schools for the Future will be discussed.
This article considers a school community initiating change in pedagogical practices to complement newbuild premises in the context of demands for school improvement, but constraints on autonomy. We investigate how school leaders planned the change towards enquiry-based learning in flexible spaces, and how teaching staff prepared for the coming change. We worked with teachers to explore current experiences of teaching and learning in self-contained classrooms where teachers mainly teach alone, and anticipations for the new building, where there will be large, shared spaces, facilitating movement and different groupings of students, encouraging student autonomy and teacher teamwork. Preparation for change was centred on an ‘experimental week’ of enquiry learning that took place in an existing large space (a school hall). Here we explore the experiences of the teachers involved, particularly their ideas about the potential for changing practices, considering these in light of the plans of the school leaders and of wider understandings of school change. We met the teachers before and after the experimental week, observed the week and conducted interviews mediated by photographs of the week. The tensions and stresses of attempting to make extensive changes to teaching practices were evident, together with suggestions that the school leaders were failing to appreciate the complexity of the change they were planning or to communicate the ideas about it that they had developed. The probable consequences for the school, given the uneven distribution of autonomy in UK schools, are briefly considered.
Anna Kristín Sigurðardóttir
added 3 research items
The aim of this study is to identify features of change in the recent design of school buildings in Iceland, and how they might affect teaching practices. Environmental and architectonic features characterising school buildings designed and built at the beginning of the 21st century are examined in light of challenges involving architecture, educational ideology, school policy and digital technology. The sample for the study consists of 20 schools located in four municipalities. Four of the school buildings were developed and built in this century, while the other 16 were designed in the 20th century. The design of all of the buildings was explored and reviewed by a multidisciplinary team. Data was collected by observations and photography at each school site, as well as by reviewing technical documents. The relationship between school design and school practices was studied through a questionnaire survey among all teachers, in order to find out whether teachers working in new environments differ from teachers in more traditional classroom settings. The results indicate a clear shift in the design of educational buildings. Flexibility, flow, openness and teamwork seem to guide recent school design. Clusters of classrooms or open spaces, transparent or movable boundaries, as well as shared spaces allowing for manifold interactions in flexible groups seem to be replacing traditional classrooms along confining corridors. Teachers working in open classroom environments collaborate more often than their counterparts. Teaching practices are also characterised by more opportunities for pupils to choose between tasks and enjoy more variation regarding group division and workspace arrangements.
The aims of this chapter are to shed light on upper secondary school students’ ideas about good spaces for learning and to explore how the actual arrangement of the physical learning environment fits with these ideas. Data were collected in nine schools in Iceland through classroom observations and group interviews with students using the diamond ranking method. Pictures were used to learn about students’ attitudes about good and bad places for learning. The data were reviewed in the context of theories on student-centred learning. The results indicated that the physical environment in upper secondary school classrooms was rather traditional, with students sitting at individual tables in rows and the teacher positioned in the front of the room. The students seemed to acknowledge this arrangement, as they know it best. It was also most often ranked somewhere in the middle of the diamond. They especially liked arrangements that allowed them some flexibility or which enabled them to influence the environment, which was not very common to these schools. Most lessons were characterised according to the teacher-centred approach.
The physical environment in schools has in the literature of late been gaining recognition as a potential factor supporting educational change. This article draws a single case out of a research sample of 20 schools in Iceland to relate an inventive design process as the school was being developed and study the current state of established school practice. The main aim is to reveal educational ideas behind a relatively progressive school design and determine how they have turned out in everyday school life. Data include observations, surveys among staff members and interviews with both school leaders and teachers. The school was designed as an open plan building intended to enhance individualised learning and team teaching with strong ties to the wider community. A decade later, the original policy is still relatively firmly in place, in particular at the primary level, while teachers at the lower secondary level have been bending somewhat the initial design plan, leaning towards traditional teaching methods and more confined classroom layouts.
Anneli Frelin
added 3 research items
This article presents results from a research project exploring the relational interplay between school staff and students, its functions and complexity in the secondary school context. School relationships (between students and different kinds of staff) are more or less indirectly related to educational content: subject matter as well as norms and values. In the teacher–student relationship, the teaching and learning of subject matter largely defines the relationship, whereas for school support staff, the relationship to such content is fairly distant. However, they all have in common that these assigned functions are created for the purpose of enabling the education of our youth. In this article, a case study from a secondary school is used to develop a typology for understanding the relevance that content may have in these different types of relationships. We also explore the sometimes unpredictable ways in which content can emerge as relevant. A year-long case study was conducted during the 2012–2013 school year at a secondary school that had recently been renovated and in which work had been done to improve the educational environment. Multiple data sources were used, including document analysis, mapping, contextual observations and interviews. Official statistics, newspaper articles and school quality reports were used to contextualize the case. In this article, interviews with different categories of school staff and students formed the main source of data. The different assigned functions of the staff were categorized as: educators, education professionals (e.g. counsellors) and education support professionals (e.g. caretakers). Although the latter were often indirectly connected to content, they could also have relevance through the relationships that they developed with students. Here, there is a point in separating the staff´s assigned function as officially described and their relation to students as played out in practice. Two examples illustrate how members of staff diverge somewhat from their assigned functions in informal places and spaces to facilitate the educational experience of the students. It is argued that in a school for all students, this flexibility in school relationships can improve students’ relations to content and school success.
This article sets out to explore how and whether the physical, social and conceived conditions in schools facilitate or disrupt support work aimed at improving student learning and preventing social exclusion. This is accomplished by comparing student support practices in the common areas of two newly renovated secondary schools built in two different time periods. The focus is on the student support staff’s (exemplified by student welfare officers and school hosts) enactment of support for students’ learning and well-being. This enactment takes place in a designed school environment, where teachers and support staff appropriate spaces for educational purposes in various ways. The interview and observational data come from two qualitative case studies. A spatial analysis perspective is used to investigate the physical, social and conceived aspects of space. The case schools, located in two municipalities, were originally built in the 1910s (Maple Grove) and the 1960s (Pine Bay). Both schools serve mixed to low SES (socio-economic status) communities and have organized student support functions in the schools’ corridors, cafeterias, recreation areas and other common spaces. These functions include the school host, the student coach and the student welfare officer. The ways in which the support staff claim the locales show that they transcend the initial design functionality by appropriating spaces for their everyday practices. Their task perception thus delineates a certain professional territory, a task perception that is taking place, so to speak. The results show that this professional territory can vary, even among those in the same profession. The support functions expand their professional territory by being mobile in the school building and thereby creating more and larger surfaces for social interactions with students and other support functions.
This article introduces a theoretical framework for studying school improvement processes such as making school environments safer. Using concepts from spatial theory, in which distinctions between mental, social and physical space are applied makes for a multidimensional analysis of processes of change. In a multilevel case study, these were combined with task perception analysis, where all categories of personnel and management in the school were studied. The results indicated the significance of borderlands in the school for helping students, of organizational transgressions aimed at ‘making things work’ and of social spaces created in the borderlands that contributed to the necessary social glue in the school. This theoretical framework offers alternative and fruitful lenses which can enrich studies of school improvement processes.
Anna Kristín Sigurðardóttir
added a project goal
DRAPES is an European network, consisting of a group of multi-disciplinary scholars, interested in educational spaces. The group is working on different projects related to the topic and present their results in national and European conferences.