Project

Cross-cultural validation of Life Domain Regret Inventory (LDRI)

Goal: This study is aimed to:
1) Explore the structure of LDRI in two countries: USA and Israel,
2) Understand differences and similarities about how people in these two different cultures refer to the concept of procrastination-related regret,
3) Compare relationships between regret and different kinds of procrastination between USA and Israel.

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Project log

Marina Goroshit
added a research item
Life regrets over inactions were found to have a long-term negative effect on people’s lives. Procrastination can be considered as a type of inaction; however, life regret regarding procrastination has been only briefly studied. The present study examined the factorial structure of the life-domain regret regarding procrastination scale (LDR-P) in two cultures (the US and Israel). In addition, the associations of regret regarding procrastination with general and behavioral procrastination measures and its mean scores were compared between the two cultures. Findings indicated a four-factor structure (career & community, interpersonal relationships, personal development, self-enhancement) based on the presence of procrastination in different life-domains. Further findings revealed strong associations between regret regarding procrastination and the two other procrastination measures mainly for the US sample. Finally, a comparison of factors means between the US and Israeli samples indicated that Americans more than Israelis experience regret over procrastination in education, career planning, finance and community life-domains. These results suggest both that life-domain regret regarding procrastination is a multi-dimensional construct that can be measured in different cultures and detect some cross-cultural differences. It should be further studied to better understand if and how it affects peoples’ lives, and how it can be addressed.
Marina Goroshit
added a research item
Regret is a common consequence of inaction in different life domains. Procrastination can be considered a type of inaction that may evoke regret. However regret regarding procrastination in different life-domains was only briefly studied. The aim of the present study was to develop and to examine the factorial structure of a new life-domain regret regarding procrastination (LDR-P) scale. The scale was validated in two cultures: the United States and Israel. Findings revealed a four-factor structure, which reflected the intensity of procrastination in different life domains. Further, this structure was validated in both cultural samples, and measurement invariance was tested. The results showed that the LDR-P scale is invariant between the two samples in terms of configural and metric invariance, meaning that the construct has the same meaning in these two cultures. This scale also has a partial scalar invariance, meaning that the construct’s latent means can be compared across groups.
Joseph R Ferrari
added 4 research items
The present study examined the relationship between two types of chronic procrastination and 12 varied life domains in which individuals report regret. Subjects were 2,887 adults (1,776 women and 1,111 men; M age = 38.63 years; SD = 14.35) from across the United States. Initially, pure arousal (n = 386), avoidant (n = 220), and nonprocrastinators (n = 215) were identified. Results found that nonprocrastinators reported significantly less regret than both avoidant and arousal procrastinators in domains of education pursuits, parenting, family and friend interactions, health and wellness, and financial planning. There were no significant differences in feelings of regret between chronic procrastinators and nonprocrastinators in romance, career planning, and spiritual and self-improvements. Further research should explore the specific causes and consequences of regret among chronic procrastinators. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
This study examined the setting and house-level characteristics of 160 self-governed, mutual-support substance abuse recovery homes, called Oxford Houses (OHs), across the United States. These dwellings were located in four different neighborhood types: upper or middle class (n = 23 houses), urban working or lower class (n = 71 houses), suburban upper or middle-class (n = 39 Houses), and suburban working or lower class (n = 27 houses). Interior dwelling characteristics and amenities located within a 2-block radius were similar across the four neighborhood types. However, houses in urban, working, and lower class neighborhoods reported more alcohol- or drug-intoxicated persons. Most importantly, despite the greater potential for environmental temptations and easier access for substances, none of the neighborhood factors including neighborhood socioeconomic status significantly predicted relapse rates over a 12-month period.
Joseph R Ferrari
added 2 research items
Permanent deacons in the Roman Catholic Church (all male) are active in their local community and congregation mobilizing faith formation events, liturgical services, and community social action programs, yet not much is known about their leadership style. The present study compared U.S. 203 permanent deacons with 202 male community-based directors of non-profit agencies on their self-reported transformational leadership style, assessed by five subscales of competencies. Deacons and directors differed significantly on three subscales; deacons scored higher on the promoting positive values and leadership as service subscales, while directors scored higher on the building a sustainable organization subscale. Results suggested that the transformational leadership styles of U.S. permanent deacons is more value and service-centered, and, in comparison, community-based non-profit leaders seem to focus more on the group’s structure and health of their organization.
Joseph R Ferrari
added 2 research items
Academic staff (n = 305) and administrative staff (n = 595) at a large urban, Catholic, and religious order teaching university completed on-line school sense of community, social desirability, and mission-identity plus mission-driven activity measures. Partial correlates (controlling for social desirability) indicated that for both faculty and staff a sense of community with co-workers and with administrators were significantly related to mission-identity characteristics of the university. Moreover, regression analyses found that for faculty and staff significant predictors of school sense of community variables were perceptions that the university was innovative and inclusive of pragmatic and risk-taking ideas. For staff but not for faculty, a feeling of Catholic pluralism on campus was a significant predictor of a sense of community with co-workers. These outcomes suggest that employees at faith-based universities may strengthen their school sense of community by institutional practices and programs that foster creating a setting for innovative, inclusive, pragmatic, and risk-taking policies, but not necessarily religious practices on campus.
Marina Goroshit
added an update
This document describes a factorial structure of regret regarding life-domain procrastination in two samples - the US and Israel
 
Marina Goroshit
added a project reference
Marina Goroshit
added a project goal
This study is aimed to:
1) Explore the structure of LDRI in two countries: USA and Israel,
2) Understand differences and similarities about how people in these two different cultures refer to the concept of procrastination-related regret,
3) Compare relationships between regret and different kinds of procrastination between USA and Israel.