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Critical Theory and Authoritarian Populism

Goal: Edited collections on critical theory and authoritarian populism. First book published December 2018 by University of Westminster Press. Second book in the works...

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Panayota Gounari
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What does the backlash against Critical Race Theory, the Capitol insurrection, Trumpism, Twitter, and neo-Nazis have in common? From Twitter to Capitol Hill: Far-right Authoritarian Populist Discourses, Social Media, and Critical Pedagogy delves deep into conservative social media and far-right extremist platforms to understand the revival and proliferation of far-right authoritarian populist discourses after Trump’s ascent to power. After the January 6th Capitol insurrection and the role social media have played in normalizing and promoting far-right populist authoritarianism, there is a renewed interest to study digital discursive aggression. Inspired by Critical Theory, Panayota Gounari masterfully uses Critical Discourse Studies to analyze social media data and articulate a discursive, pedagogical and historical project.
Jeremiah Morelock
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How to Critique Authoritarian Populism: Methodologies of the Frankfurt School, will be out in April, 2021.
Here is the site for the book at Brill:
 
Jeremiah Morelock
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More details to follow.
 
Jeremiah Morelock
added 3 research items
FREE DOWNLOAD of the full book and individual chapters are available AT: https://www.uwestminsterpress.co.uk/site/books/10.16997/book30/ |.................................................| After President Trump’s election, BREXIT and the widespread rise of far-Right political parties, much public discussion has intensely focused on populism and authoritarianism. In the middle of the twentieth century, members of the early Frankfurt School prolifically studied and theorized fascism and anti-Semitism in Germany and the United States. In this volume, leading European and American scholars apply insights from the early Frankfurt School to present-day authoritarian populism, including the Trump phenomenon and related developments across the globe. Chapters are arranged into three sections exploring different aspects of the topic: theories, historical foundations, and manifestations via social media. Contributions examine the vital political, psychological and anthropological theories of early Frankfurt School thinkers, and how their insights could be applied now amidst the insecurities and confusions of twenty-first century life. The many theorists considered include Adorno, Fromm, Löwenthal and Marcuse, alongside analysis of Austrian Facebook pages and Trump’s tweets and operatic media drama. This book is a major contribution towards deeper understanding of populism’s resurgence in the age of digital capitalism.... CONTENTS... Preface, Douglas Kellner/ Introduction: The Frankfurt School and Authoritarian Populism – A Historical Outline, Jeremiah Morelock... |Part 1: THEORIES OF AUTHORITARIANISM|... 1. Frankfurt School Critical Theory and the Persistence of Authoritarian Populism in the United States, John Abromeit/ 2. The Persistence of the Authoritarian Appeal: On Critical Theory as a Framework for Studying Populist Actors in European Democracies, Lars Rensmann/ 3. Understanding Right and Left Populism, Samir Gandesha/ 4. Donald Trump as Authoritarian Populist: A Frommian Analysis, Douglas Kellner... |PART 2: FOUNDATIONS OF AUTHORITARIANISM|... 5. From Modernity to Bigotry, Stephen Eric Bronner/ 6. Opposing Authoritarian Populism: The Challenge and Necessity of a New World System, Charles Reitz/ 7. Public Sphere and World-System: Theorizing Populism at the Margins, Jeremiah Morelock and Felipe Ziotti Narita... |Part 3: DIGITAL AUTHORITARIANISM|... 8. Racism, Nationalism and Right-Wing Extremism Online: The Austrian Presidential Election 2016 on Facebook, Christian Fuchs/ 9. Authoritarianism, Discourse and Social Media: Trump as the ‘American Agitator’, Panayota Gounari/ 10. Phantasmagoria and the Trump Opera, Forrest Muelrath
FREE DOWNLOAD AT: https://www.uwestminsterpress.co.uk/site/books/10.16997/book30.a/ One of the most famous messages from the Institute for Social Research is that liberal-democratic societies tend to move toward fascism. With the recent surge of far-Right populism throughout the West, this Frankfurt School warning reveals its prescience. Many other insights pertinent to authoritarian and populist trends are contained in their writings. The work of the early Frankfurt School demands concerted revisiting, and such is the purpose of the present volume, Critical Theory and Authoritarian Populism. Before providing an outline of its contents ‘Critical Theory and ‘authoritarian populism’ are defined as they are used in the chapter before providing a rough chronology of the early Frankfurt School, focusing on their writings about authoritarianism, prejudice and populism. Areas surveyed include early writings, theories of the Nazi state, working for the OSS in WWII, continuing potential for authoritarianism, empirical work in 1944-1951, Studies in Prejudice, Group Experiment, Marxism contra Stalinism, the university and the 1960s student movement.
FREE DOWNLOAD AT: https://www.uwestminsterpress.co.uk/site/books/10.16997/book30/ Building from Jürgen Habermas and Immanuel Wallerstein, we develop a scheme in application to authoritarian populism in general, and specifically to populisms in the history of peripheral and semi-peripheral countries of Latin America in their world-systems context. Our discussion is divided into three main components: (1) a conceptual delimitation of populism and its authoritarian variations; (2) an outline of some of Habermas’ and Wallerstein’s theories as they pertain to populism; and (3) an attempt at bringing Habermas’ and Wallerstein’s theoretical models into conversation via an operational scheme dealing with world-systems analysis and the problem of the public sphere and lifeworld. Our main effort consists in bringing the rise of the twentieth century industrial world (urban life, urban masses, the press and so on) and the challenges of the public sphere together to understand the problem of populism in (semi)peripheral countries. Accelerated capitalist change produces major impacts on communicative structures, so that, more than a political issue confined to contemporary Western democracies, populism deals with the transnational developments of the modern world-system. At the margins, thus, populism and its authoritarian slips have strong roots in the context of global capitalist transformations of local lifeworlds.
Jeremiah Morelock
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The book will be available as of December 17.
 
Jeremiah Morelock
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Final proofs are being drafted, authors are delivering metadata, the cover is being finalized. Give it a month or two or three still, but the book will be available soon.
Contributors (other than myself):
Douglas Kellner
John Abromeit
Stephen Eric Bronner
Samir Gandesha
Christian Fuchs
Charles Reitz
Panayota Gounari
Felipe Ziotti Narita
Forrest Muelrath
 
Jeremiah Morelock
added a research item
A ascensão dos movimentos populistas no cenário político contemporâneo não é um processo circunstancial. Mais do que um líder carismático ou um apelo direto ao povo, o populismo é um fenômeno sociocultural amplo que mobiliza a atual imaginação política e produz engajamento subjetivo com o campo do político. O livro Critical Theory and Authoritarian Populism, que será publicado em agosto de 2018 pela editora da Universidade de Westminster na Inglaterra (volume editado por Jeremiah Morelock, contando com um longo capítulo assinado por nós), pretende justamente analisar essa questão. A incapacidade estrutural das instituições de representação na canalização de demandas sociais e pressões culturais é o centro do problema. Essas reivindicações são expressões de processos de modernização, em que narrativas de inclusão política e ampliação das condições de representação tornam-se espécies de lugares-comuns. As ideias e a realidade não coincidem, e o problema é justamente quando as ideias reivindicam mais do que a realidade consegue abarcar. Por um lado, a ascensão do anti-intelectualismo, como um ataque político contra instituições do establishment (universidades, partidos e governo) e seu mainstream "feudal", "arcaico" ou "corporativista", é uma expressão cultural dessa situação, uma vez que o "bota-abaixo" deriva de um juízo rasteiro que condiciona as dicotomias sociais a um antagonismo estreito. Por outro lado, os discursos anti-establishment emergem da crise de representação e da desconfiança política como problemas endógenos nos sistemas democráticos.
Jeremiah Morelock
added a project goal
Edited collections on critical theory and authoritarian populism. First book published December 2018 by University of Westminster Press. Second book in the works...