Project

Comprehensive Rehabilitation for People with a History of Electroconvulsive Therapy's Low-Voltage Contact

Goal: Create a comprehensive rehabilitation assessment and treatment plan for people with a history of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) to improve quality of life after repeated exposure to low-voltage/high field strength electricity.

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Sarah Price Hancock
added an update
Original research discussing acquired communication disorders caused by electrical injury (EI). EI pose unique communication barriers due to evolving symptom manifestation. As the person ages away from the initial injury, communication barriers can become more pronounced with age. This presentation provides details explaining how electrical trauma, repeated electrical trauma and lengthy exposure to other forms of non-ionizing radiation can impact speech and communication. Following both UK's National Radiological Protection Board and United States Gulf War Hearing recommendations to study electroconvulsive therapy recipients to better understand the heterogeneity of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and other neurodegenerative diseases.
I present four case studies: Functional NeuroCognitive Imaging results and six videos of neuromuscular symptoms impacting speech experienced by ECT recipients now living with the neurological sequela of electrical injury.
Presentation provides insights into potential interventions which successfully work for the presenter who lives with speech and communication disorders as a result of chronic electroconvulsive therapy. It identifies strategies to make alternative augmentative communication (AAC) less fatiguing for people who live with a history of chronic exposure to non-ionizing radiation. The presentation concludes with ideas for future research.
  • Non-ionizing radiation exposures and subsequent neurodegenerative diseases (Progressive supranuclear palsy and Myoneural Disorders: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Motor Neuron Disease and Muscular Sclerosis).
  • Immediate and delayed consequences of Electrical Injury/Electromagnetic injury
  • Repetitive mild to moderate Traumatic Brain Injuries
  • Cognitive communication disorder
  • Trigeminal, vagal and other cranial nerve dysfunction.
  • Electroporation
  • Motor Neuron Dysfunction/Motor Neuron Loss
  • Demyelination
  • Episodic Paroxysmal Neuromuscular Disorders
  • Acquired Channelopathies
  • Thiols
  • Aphasia
  • Verbal Apraxia
  • Dysarthria, Anarthria
  • Preserving residual voice
  • Barriers to accessing AAC and Voice Banking
  • AAC Recommendations
The presentation is available with 1.0 CEU through "AAC in the Cloud" website (https://presenters.aacconference.com/videos/UXpVd1FUSXk=)
 
Congrats to you all, exciting questions. I have the last year had reason to look for clinical experience and research on therapeutic alternatives to support and enhance the glymphatic rinse cycle to clear the brain of debris/toxins/plaque, and will be interested if you have followed this promising path. And of course, I am following the human rights aspect of the electroschock procedure and the foundations for this extreme violation of humans'
bodies and souls. Best, ingerkari
 
Sarah Price Hancock
added an update
This presentation includes four case studies, six videos and a wealth of information explaining how repetitive electrical trauma to the trigeminal nerve impacts speech and communication.
 
Sarah Price Hancock
added a research item
Original research discussing acquired communication disorders caused by electrical trauma which pose unique communication barriers due to their evolving symptom manifestation. As the person ages away from the initial injury, communication barriers can become more pronounced with age. This presentation provides details explaining how electrical trauma, repeated electrical trauma and lengthy exposure to other forms of non-ionizing radiation can impact speech and communication. Following both UK's National Radiological Protection Board and United States Gulf War Hearing recommendations to study electroconvulsive therapy recipients to better understand the heterogeneity of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and other neurodegenerative diseases. I present four different case studies: Functional NeuroCognitive Imaging results and videos of ECT recipients now living with the neurological sequela of electrical injury which impacts speech and communication. It provides insights into the potential interventions which successfully work for the presenter who lives with speech and communication disorders as a result of chronic electroconvulsive therapy. It identifies strategies to make alternative augmentative communication (AAC) less fatiguing for people who live with a history of chronic exposure to non-ionizing radiation. The presentation concludes with ideas for future research. -Non-ionizing radiation exposures and subsequent neurodegenerative diseases (Progressive supranuclear palsy and Myoneural Disorders: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Motor Neuron Disease and Muscular Sclerosis). -Immediate and delayed consequences of Electrical Injury/Electromagnetic injury -Repetitive mild to moderate Traumatic Brain Injuries -Cognitive communication disorder -Anoxia/Hypoxia -Trigeminal, vagal and other cranial nerve dysfunction. -Electroporation -Motor Neuron Dysfunction/Motor Neuron Loss -Demyelination -Episodic Paroxysmal Neuromuscular Disorders -Acquired Channelopathies -Thiols -Aphasia -Verbal Apraxia -Dysarthria, Anarthria -Preserving residual voice -Barriers to accessing AAC -Voice Banking -AAC Recommendations The presentation is available with 1.0 CEU through "AAC in the Cloud" website (https://presenters.aacconference.com/videos/UXpVd1FUSXk=)
Sarah Price Hancock
added a research item
This presentation was given at the international "A Disorder for Everyone" annual festival, September 17, 2021. It answers the following questions: -Is all ECT the same? -Is ECT Safe? Does ECT work? -Does ECT cause permanent Brain Damage? -Does ECT cause permanent memory loss? -Does ECT cause a repetitive mild traumatic brain injury? -Does ECT cause a repetitive moderate traumatic brain injury? -Can ECT be considered an acquired brain injury? -Does ECT cause an Electrical Injury? -What are some of the potential long-term consequences of ECT? -What is low-voltage electrical injury sequalae? -What does Dr. Bennet Omalu have to say about ECT? -Can ECT damage be seen on a brain scan? -What are acquired channelopathies? -What causes ECT damage? -What is irreversible electroporation? -Where can I get additional information on support for Life after ECT? -If I have ECT for depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, borderline personality disorder, autism, anxiety, chronic pain, sleep issues, schizoaffective disorder, parkinsonism, akathisia or any other diagnosis, what can I expect? -What should be included in electroconvulsive therapy's legal informed consent process? -What does the US FDA say about ECT's long term safety and efficacy? -Are medical device manufacturers required by the FDA to warn patients about anything? -How many people get Shock treatment each year? For more information: **International Patient Safety Petition www.Change.Org/PatientSafetyECT **Listen to the Sarah’s Interview on The Depression Files Podcast https://allevin18.podbean.com/e/al-in... Recent articles in the Psychiatric Times **ECT: Dangerous on either side of the Pond https://www.psychiatrictimes.com/view... **Raising Doubts About ECT https://www.psychiatrictimes.com/view... **St. John's Rehab an electrical injury rehabilitation program in Toronto, Canada run by Dr. Marc Jeschke https://sunnybrook.ca/content/?page=s... **www.NORAvisionRehab.org **Follow @PsychRecovery @ClinpsychLucy @ReadReadj @CunliffeSue’s and #AuditECT on Twitter **www.LifeAfterECT.com
Sarah Price Hancock
added a research item
Twelve key concerns left unaddressed by mainstream psychiatry's research on electroconvulsive therapy based on recent peer-reviewed literature, device manufacturer's user manual and regulatory update, SAMHSA facility directory and US insurance reimbursement practices.
Sarah Price Hancock
added a research item
This article details concerns about electroconvulsive therapy's use. Concerns detailed include: legal informed consent, international lack of universal administration methods, rate of use, regulatory measures to in place ensure patient safety, Medicare insurance reimbursements, absence of routine comprehensive ECT outcome tracking, absence of routine comprehensive assessment for severe adverse events and access to brain injury rehabilitation and other measures required to improve quality of life after treatment as needed.
Sarah Price Hancock
added an update
This update includes additional articles specifically looking how pulsed bipolar high electric fields can permanently impact voltage gated ion channels.
Articles also include how these changes impact voltage gated ion channels in different kinds of cells.
 
Sarah Price Hancock
added an update
On December 28, 2020 the FDA received an open letter requesting the expedited release of all Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) safety studies Pre-Market Approval (PMA) applications and ECT’s electric current limits/Product Development Protocols (PDP) submitted by March 27, 2019 (day after the FDA’s deadline). Sarah Price Hancock, certified rehabilitation counselor, authored the open letter co-signed by 14 professional and paraprofessional organizations, 168 Americans, and 49 international citizens from countries whose medical device regulations rely in part on FDA decision. Signatories included up to eight words describing their Real-World Data and Real-World Evidence regarding ECT’s post-market safety and adverse events. This letter was submitted in response to the FDA’s denial of FIOA request number 2020-7319.
December 26, 2020 marks the two-year anniversary of the US Food and Drug Administration’s reclassifying of unstandardized ECT medical devices.
The 2018 reclassification occurred despite:
  • Multiple ECT devices in modern clinical practice having unique electrical charge, voltage current output and settings.
  • Zero safety studies using modern clinical parameters (PMA) applications) on file with FDA.
  • Zero electric current dosing protocols (PDP) on file with FDA.
  • October 2018 federal case (Riera v. Somatics, LLC, 18-56470) confidential settlement for “permanent brain damage.”
  • October 2018 Thymatron user manual “Regulatory Update” citing the American Psychiatric Association’s acknowledged seven independent risks of “permanent memory loss or permanent brain damage.”
  • Zero regulations in place to reduce “permanent memory loss or permanent brain damage” risks.
  • Zero regulations in place to systematically conduct comprehensive serious adverse event assessments in every ECT recipient.
  • Community ECT clinics using outdated (2001) “treatment recommendations” from the American Psychiatric Association ECT including informed consent materials.
  • No medical board requirements regarding the study of ECT’s neuropathology to qualify for ECT privileges or follow-up care.
“Permanent Memory Loss” is only one of many possible severe adverse events
ECT use is increasing exponentially across America
Since 2018 FDA reclassification, 2020 Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) National Psychiatric Facility Directory shows a 34% increase in ECT providers using unstandardized medical devices. There are regulations regarding routinely providing every ECT recipient with comprehensive severe adverse event assessments or appropriate rehabilitation.
Though typical PR releases advocating ECT use estimate 100,000 Americans receive ECT yearly, that number is a estimate from the 1970’s. Dr. Harold Sackeim, ECT researcher and forensic expert stated in 2004 court deposition that an estimated two million people receive ECT yearly worldwide. American ECT use is not regulated or routinely audited nationwide.
ECT is Repetitive mild Traumatic Brain Injury (RmTBI) caused by high electric field strength
Neuropathologist, Dr. Bennet Omalu, first to publish on Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) in NFL football players, touched on ECT when discussing functional brain injuries at the California Department of Rehabilitation’s Brain Injury Advisory Board Meeting. Meeting minutes (dated August 26, 2019) state:
"Dr. Bennett Omalu confirmed repetitive head trauma causing functional injuries are not readily seen on standard scans. . . . Dr. Omalu also confirmed that neuropathology of electrical injury as well as the neuropathology of people with a history of electroconvulsive therapy is well recognized as causing extensive functional changes to brain activity and should be considered in the context of both electrical injury and repetitive electrical trauma to the head because natural laws governing electricity aren't changed based on the intent of medical administration."
ECT is prescribed repeated exposure to flashed pulses of high-field strength electricity. Typical American ECT medical devices manufactured by MECTA and Somatics, LLC used in modern clinical practice include:
  • MECTA: pulses out up to 800 milliamperes (mA) current, 240 volts (v) and 574 millicoulombs (mC) charge
  • Somatics’ Thymatron: pulses out 900 mA, up to 450 v, 504 mC.
Depending on device settings, pulsed current lasts up to eight seconds. APA’s 1978 taskforce report states “Conventional electrode placement is bitemporal with currents concentrated in the anterior temporal lobes and the brain stem.” Initial cellular damage is isolated to path receiving highest current. Neurodegeneration occurs with aging as surrounding cells previously dependent on dead or damaged cells no longer receive nutrition, pulses, and oxygen.
ECT’s long-term safety and effectiveness is not demonstrated.
Somatics’ Thymatron System IV ECT medical device 2019 instruction manual states “long-term safety and effectiveness of ECT treatment has not been demonstrated, and long-term follow-up may be needed.” Psychiatrists are prescribing RmTBI by electric current but modern medical providers are not adequately trained to provide long-term follow-up necessary to support electrical injury’s RmTBI.
International critical ECT researcher, UK Professor, Dr. John Read, evaluated ECT’s placebo trials with Dr. Irving Kirsch, Harvard’s Associate Director of Placebo Studies to evaluate clinical validity of the 11 published ECT Placebo (Sham-ECT (SECT) trials, none of which were double blind. Using a 24-point scale (five basic Cochrane Collaboration criteria and 19 quality indicators, some of which are specific to ECT) their study concluded:
  1. Placebo studies average score was 12.3 of 24 points (none met valid modern randomized control trial standards)
  2. Given placebo effect, ECT vs Sham-ECT (placebo) studies are wrong to conclude ECT is effective without meeting modern, blinded randomized control trial standards.
  3. Due to well documented risks, ECT should be suspended immediately pending the conduction of rigorous safety and efficacy testing trials.
The open letter requests all PMA and PDP pertaining to rigorous blinded safety and efficacy trials. ECT recipients and others making treatment decisions need this information for informed consent purposes. The letter is submitted as part of an international Patient Safety ECT campaign (#AuditECT) with more than 12, 350 supporters. For more information, contact Sarah Price Hancock, MS, CRC (SPHancock(at)psychrecoveryandrehab(dot)com).
Article All-cause mortality among recipients of electroconvulsive th...
 
Sarah Price Hancock
added an update
For immediate release
Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) or “shock treatment” causes “imminent threat to the life or physical safety” of vulnerable, mentally disabled individuals. Major adverse cardiac events and death after ECT happen in one of 50 patients and after about one in 200 – 500 ECT treatments (1). Hundreds of thousands of people thirteen years and older are receiving ECT across nationwide. No one is systematically regulating or auditing ECT use in America (2).
December 28, 2020 the FDA received an open letter requesting the expedited release of all Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) safety studies Pre-Market Approval (PMA) applications and ECT’s electric current limits/Product Development Protocols (PDP) submitted by the FDA’s deadline (3).
Sarah Price Hancock, nationally certified rehabilitation counselor and former professor of clinical rehabilitation counseling at San Diego State University authored the open letter co-signed by 14 professional and paraprofessional organizations, 168 Americans, and 49 international citizens from countries whose medical device regulations rely in part on FDA decision. Signatories included up to eight words describing their Real-World Data and Real-World Evidence regarding ECT’s post-market safety and adverse events. This letter was submitted in response to the FDA’s denial of FIOA request number 2020-7319.
December 26, 2020 marked the two-year anniversary of the US Food and Drug Administration’s reclassifying of unstandardized ECT medical devices. Since reclassification, 34% more US hospitals now offer ECT (4,5).
ECT is Repetitive mild Traumatic Brain Injury (RmTBI) caused by high electric field strength (6). According to one ECT device manufacturer, ECT’s “long-term safety and effectiveness is not demonstrated”(7). “Permanent Memory Loss and permanent brain damage” are two of the many possible severe adverse events listed in the one of the unstandardized medical device user manuals (7).
After reanalyzing every available ECT vs placebo study, experts call for its immediate suspension pending proof of efficacy (8,9) In an effort to prioritize patient safety and informed consent, more than 200 people signed an open letter to the FDA for the expedited released of ECT’s safety studies and electrical dosing protocols/limitations. This open letter is part of a larger patient safety and informed consent movement to Standardize, Regulate & Audit ECT, providing brain injury rehabilitation as needed (#AuditECT). At this time, more than 12,300 people have signed the international petition (www.change.org/PatientSafetyECT).
For more information, please contact Sarah Price Hancock, MS, CRC (SPHancock@psychrecoveryandrehab(dot)com).
References
1. Duma. Review Identifies Rate of Major Cardiac Events After Electroconvulsive Therapy. Clinical Anesthesiology. https://www.anesthesiologynews.com/Clinical-Anesthesiology/Article/06-18/Review-Identifies-Rate-of-Major-Cardiac-Events-After-Electroconvulsive-Therapy/48812. Published 2018.
2. Hancock SP. Whose Finger is Taking the Pulse of America’s Shock Treatment Controversy? Mad In America. https://www.madinamerica.com/2020/07/finger-pulse-shock-treatment-controversy/. Published July 16, 2020.
3. US Food and Drug Administration. Neurological Devices; Reclassification of Electroconvulsive Therapy Devices; Effective Date of Requirement for Premarket Approval for Electroconvulsive Therapy Devices for Certain Specified Intended Uses. Washington DC: US Department of Health and Human Services: Food and Drug Administration; 2019:66103-66124. https://www.regulations.gov/contentStreamer?documentId=FDA-2014-N-1210-3431&contentType=pdf.
4. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2018 National Directory of Mental Health Treatment Facilities. Rockville; 2018. https://www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/cbhsq-reports/nmhss_directory_2018.pdf. Accessed May 12, 2019.
5. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2020 National Directory Of Mental Health Treatment Facilities. Rockville; 2020. https://www.samhsa.gov/data/report/2020-national-directory-mental-health-treatment-facilities.
6. Omalu B, Hansen S, Williams E, et al. Traumatic Brain Injury Advisory Board Meeting Minutes. Sacramento; 2019. https://www.dor.ca.gov/Content/DorIncludes/documents/TBI/TBI Full Committee Meeting Minutes 8-26-19.docx.
7. Somatics LLC. User Manual Thymatron® System IV. Venice; 2019. http://thymatron.com/downloads/System_IV_Instruction_Manual_Rev21.pdf.
8. Read J, Kirsch I, McGrath L. Electroconvulsive Therapy for Depression: A Review of the Quality of ECT versus Sham ECT Trials and Meta-Analyses. Ethical Hum Psychol Psychiatry. 2019;21(2):64-103. doi:10.1891/EHPP-D-19-00014
9. Vlessides M. Experts Call for Immediate Suspension of ECT, Others Push Back. Medscape. https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/934536. Published July 24, 2020. Accessed December 30, 2020.
 
Sarah Price Hancock
added a research item
This is a working literature review detailing research detailing how repeated exposure to high field strength electricity deteriorates voltage gated ion channels resulting in acquired channelopathies. It provides a window of understanding into the episodic paroxysmal neuromuscular symptoms patients manifest or describe experiencing specific to episodic paroxysmal dyskenisia, Acquired Periodic Paralysis, episodic dystonia, episodic ataxia, sodium-dysregulation driven atypical hemipelagic migraines, calcium-dysregulation Tetanic (non-epileptic) seizures, Arrhythmia, long QT, etc. This information is relevant for neuromuscular specialists, neurologists, psychiatrists, emergency room doctors, general practitioners, and dentists treating patients with medication which acts on ion channels (lidocaine and other amino amines, albuterol inhalers). People with the highest exposure to repetitive low-voltage electrical injury are electricians, welders, veterans, or other professionals repeatedly exposed to high field strength electricity in work environments, people exposed to low-voltage/high field strength electrical injury in the home, and patients prescribed repeated exposure to high field strength electricity (Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT)/Electroshock treatment, Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), etc.)
Sarah Price Hancock
added an update
Ignite Session with Sarah Price Hancock - 2015 Recovery Workforce Summit, Psychiatric Rehabilitation Association (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OULc-XJQVGw)
 
Sarah Price Hancock
added a research item
Identifying possible adverse events, practical implications and rehabilitation needs for people with a history of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT).
Sarah Price Hancock
added a project goal
Create a comprehensive rehabilitation assessment and treatment plan for people with a history of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) to improve quality of life after repeated exposure to low-voltage/high field strength electricity.