Project

Commercial Fishing

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39

Project log

Charles R Menzies
added 3 research items
This paper examines the development of the Irish pelagic fleet and how it has impacted place-based fishing livelihoods in southwest County Donegal, both positively and negatively. As part of this effort, we consider how shifting local and global sociopolitical realities have shaped linkages between resource access and people-place connections in southwest Donegal. We pay particular attention to how Irish fishing opportunities, both at home and abroad, are created and constrained under EU governance and how this drives the displacement of fishing livelihoods from coastal southwest Donegal. We identify power as a key and dynamic mechanism underlying fishery systems in the Irish context. Drawing on interview and ethnographic data we discuss how power is perceived and exercised among local fishery stakeholders, and how this in turn works to shape contemporary adaptive strategies in rural fishery dependent Ireland.
This paper charts the path of one fishing crew's resistance to the attempts of their skipper to force them to comply with his wishes over the course of the fishing season by drawing upon the personal journals of the author, a commercial fisher of twelve years. The struggle, between skipper and crew, capital and labour, manifests itself on fishing vessels in British Columbia in the mundane activities and conversations of everyday life in which crews attempt to exert control over the conditions under which they work. By developing and maintaining social solidarity, crews are able to subvert the authority of the skipper and effect greater control over their work environment. However, to have any lasting effect on the relations of domination, the subordinate's challenge of authority must be self-consciously aware of the social process of production within capitalism.
Charles R Menzies
added 2 research items
This study examines a community of 'co-operators' in which fishers of disparate social classes are united in a collective project, the Prince Rupert Fishermen's Co-operative Association.s In this fishers' co-operative, crew members - who own "nothing but their own labour" - join their skippers in an explicit coalition to defend "their business." To describe the member fishers of the PRFCA as a community which transcends class is not to say class relations are unimportant. Class does matter. However, reductionist definitions of class, Marxist or otherwise, are of no assistance in understanding the complexities and contradictions of this group of co-operative fishers in British Columbia.
Charles R Menzies
added 2 research items
This article discusses the opposition of Euro-Canadian fishers to First Nations' land claims in British Columbia, Canada. The author draws upon his personal experience growing up in a fishing family from northern British Columbia to draw out the complexities of this conflict The object of the article is not to convince the reader of the rightness or wrongness of Euro-Canadian opposition to First Nations' land claims but rather to create a space in which their fear of and their reactions to land claims can be better understood. [Euro-Canadians, First Nations, Aboriginal rights, fishing, British Columbia, ethnic conflict]
Charles R Menzies
added 2 research items
Co-operative forms of enterprise are often held up as a progressive, moderate alternative to the privations of the capitalist market economy. This paper considers the Prince Rupert Fishermen's Co-op and its relations with organized labour in the north of British Columbia. The paper describes a contradiction within the co-op based on the possibilities of social ownership within a market economy. Through a discussion of the escalating labour conflicts between the co-op and its non-member employees the weaknesses of co-operative enterprises are revealed. /// Les entreprises en forme de coopérative sont souvent considérées comme solutions progressistes et modérées qui peuvent remplacer les entreprises privées d'une économie de marché capitaliste. Cet article présente la Coopérative des pêcheurs de Prince Rupert et ses relations avec la main-d'oeuvre organisée au nord de Colombie-Britannique. Il décrit une contradiction qui existe dans cette coopérative basée sur les possibilités de propriété collective au sein d'une économie de marché. Par suite d'une discussion des conflits de travail croissants entre la coopérative et ses employées et employés non membres, les faiblesses des coopératives en tant qu'entreprises se sont manifestées par une révélation.
Small-scale, family fi shing enterprises manage to persist despite the diffi cult economic and ecological changes and disruptions they almost constantly have expe-rienced during the past several decades. Drawing upon long-term ethnographic and historical research in the Bigouden region of France, this paper asks why and how family-based fi shing enterprises continue in the face of what seem to be overwhelm-ing odds. This is accomplished through an evaluation of the social reproduction of family-based fi shing enterprises in the Bigouden region of France. Specifi c attention is paid to: (1) the factors that contribute to the maintenance of boat ownership from one generation to the next generation, and (2) an exploration of the extent to which boat ownership in one generation can be linked to a family's continued participation in the fi shery in subsequent generations. The paper concludes by arguing that con-tinuation in the fi shery during a period of overall declining employment has been contingent upon the degree of vessel ownership in the preceding generation.