Project

Christian Counseling and Psychotherapy

Updates
0 new
0
Recommendations
0 new
0
Followers
0 new
2
Reads
0 new
244

Project log

Geoffrey W Sutton
added a research item
The purpose of this book is to help mental health professionals increase their cultural competence to better serve Pentecostal and Charismatic Christians who are congregants in the world’s fastest-growing religious movement. My focus is twofold. First, I aim to increase the reader’s awareness and knowledge about Christians who live their faith within Pentecostal cultures. Second, I hope to increase the reader’s knowledge about the assessment and treatment of Pentecostal and Charismatic Christians with mental health needs based on a review of research and recommendations from experienced clinicians. My approach to assessment and treatment is the commonly held view that best practices are holistic. Therefore, I will attempt to integrate Pentecostal and Charismatic spirituality with assessment and treatment in ways that respect the spirituality of the person seeking treatment and enhances therapeutic outcomes. Key words: Christian counseling and psychotherapy, Christian spirituality, Psychology of Pentecostalism, Christianity and sexism, Christianity and racism, Christianity and LGBTQ, Psychotherapy and demon possession
Geoffrey W Sutton
added 6 research items
The editors have assembled clinicians and psychological scientists to offer a state of the practice review of the links between Christian counseling or psychotherapy and scientific evidence. The two-fold goal aims to inform clinicians about Christian practice and the nature of the supporting evidence. After establishing the notion of what constitutes scientific evidence in the Introduction (Chapter 1), the editors present 13 chapters focused on interventions, which are organized into three parts. The fourth part offers three chapters of reflections.
A summary of recent research on Christian Counseling followed by findings from a survey of therapists focused on the religious-spiritual techniques they use.
Geoffrey W Sutton
added a research item
The purpose of Lay Counseling is ambitious—providing “a comprehensive foundation for understanding biblical caregiving (p.15).” Initially, the authors present Gary Collins’ definition of Christian Counseling, which is “a caring relationship in which one person tries to help another deal more effectively with the stresses of life (p.15).” What we find in Lay Counseling are strategies for selecting, training, supervising, and evaluating lay Christian counselors and guidelines for establishing lay counseling programs. I will summarize the 12 chapters and resources in this review.
Geoffrey W Sutton
added a research item
Christian psychotherapy is in high demand but in the few existing studies, outcomes from spiritually accommodated treatments typically do not outperform secular treatments on mental health outcomes. Likewise, it is unclear whether spiritual patient factors account for variance in satisfaction with treatment or patient well-being beyond what is explained by other patient factors. We conducted two studies on adults who attended Christian psychotherapy within the last six months to understand the relative contributions of patient factors to satisfaction with Christian psychotherapy and current well-being. We drew on hope theory as a primary general patient factor but considered personality traits given prior research. Second, we drew upon attachment theory framed as attachment to God (AG) as the primary patient spiritual factor but considered spiritual practices. In study 1 (two Christian universities; N = 75). hope accounted for most variance but extraversion was also predictive. Spiritual factors, primarily AG, added incremental value. In Study 2, we sampled adults (Amazon mTurk) who saw different providers (clergy, 46; mental health 57). Dispositional hope accounted for most of the variance in satisfaction with, and a willingness to return, to treatment as well as general and spiritual well-being. Spiritual factors (AG, practices) predicted additional variance for all criteria in the mental health sample but were only related to general well-being in the clergy sample. We concluded that when patients’ perspectives are considered, most of the variance in treatment satisfaction can be accounted for by hope but spiritual factors, primarily attachment to God, add nuanced incremental value. (prepublication version) Key words: Christian counseling and psychotherapy, Christian spirituality, Measuring counseling outcomes, Christianity and the psychology of hope, psychotherapy and personality,