Project

Cambridge handbook of cultural-historical psychology by Yasnitsky, Van der Veer, & Ferrari (Eds.)

Goal: The field of cultural-historical psychology originated in the work of Lev Vygotsky and the Vygotsky Circle in the Soviet Union more than eighty years ago, and has now established a powerful research tradition in Russia and the West. The Cambridge Handbook of Cultural-Historical Psychology is the first volume to systematically present cultural-historical psychology as an integrative/holistic developmental science of mind, brain, and culture. Its main focus is the inseparable unity of the historically evolving human mind, brain, and culture, and the ways to understand it. The contributors are major international experts in the field, and include authors of major works on Lev Vygotsky, direct collaborators and associates of Alexander Luria, and renowned neurologist Oliver Sacks. The Handbook will be of interest to students and scholars in the fields of psychology, education, humanities and neuroscience.

* The most detailed account to date of the scientific legacies of Russian scholars, Lev Vygotsky and Alexander Luria
* Discusses the interplay between cultural-historical psychology and other disciplines, both well-established and newly emerging ones alike
* Features a concluding chapter on 'romantic science' by best-selling author, neurologist and scholar, Oliver Sacks

Date: 29 September 2014

Updates
0 new
51
Recommendations
0 new
29
Followers
0 new
257
Reads
0 new
4178

Project log

Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
Here is a new--fascinating and exciting!--development of the "cultural-historical" project in psychology. Any time soon, the continental European journal of intellectually aristocratic pedigree most appropriately titled 'Gestalt Theory. An International Multidisciplinary Journal' [ https://sciendo.com/journal/GTH ] is to publish a target paper (in three parts) that deals with a range of issues of transnational science of Soviet Marxist-German-American holistic psychology of the interwar period. All those interested are invited to comment and submit their discussion papers to the subsequent issues of the journal. Therefore, consider this message as a CALL FOR PAPERS, too. Feel free to express your interest in the Comments, below. The titles of the target paper(s) are:
Anton Yasnitsky
Cultural–Historical Gestalt Theory and Beyond:
“The Russians Are Coming!”
GESTALT THEORY, DOI 10.2478/gth-2021-0026
© 2021 (ISSN 2519-5808); Vol. 43, No. 2, 1–10
Anton Yasnitsky
Cultural–Historical Gestalt Theory and Beyond:
A New History (and Theory) of the “Informal Personal Network”
of Intellectuals Is Needed
GESTALT THEORY, DOI 10.2478/gth-2021-0027
© 2021 (ISSN 2519-5808); Vol. 43, No. 3, 1–14
Anton Yasnitsky
Cultural–Historical Gestalt Theory and Beyond:
Toward Pragmatic Anthropology
GESTALT THEORY, DOI 10.2478/gth-2021-0028
© 2021 (ISSN 2519-5808); Vol. 43, No. 3, 1–15
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
Ladies and gentlemen, dear colleagues, --
Earlier, we have already had a chance to discuss the topic of "Alexander LURIA's publication of 1976 as FRAUD?", see below. To keep the ball rolling, here is a new--and absolutely exciting!--input on the matter. See the most recent work of our geographically distant colleagues:
Arunkumar, M., Van Paridon, J., Ostarek, M., & Huettig, F. (in press).
Do illiterates have illusions? A conceptual (non)replication of Luria (1976).
Journal of Cultural Cognitive Science.
A pdf is attached herewith, for convenience sake; also, see --
URL:
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
Let's state the obvious: after a long period of a triumphant rise and international celebration, the global "Vygotskiana" is definitely in a profound crisis these last years, as demonstrated by the dramatic decrease of scholarly citations of his works worldwide over the last 3-4 years (the "Vygotsky Bubble", even further accelerating in 2020s; see https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=L4S0dT0AAAAJ ). Secondly, the "Vygotsky crisis" is also demonstrated by the considerable loss of interest in Vygotsky among general readership ( for the self-explanatory visualization of the stats of English wiki page "Lev Vygotsky" encyclopedia entry visits see: https://pageviews.toolforge.org/?project=en.wikipedia.org&platform=all-access&agent=user&redirects=0&start=2015-07&end=2021-02&pages=Lev_Vygotsky ).
The situation is really curious to some, alarming, frustrating and even embarrassing--to others. Yet, in any case, it is truly thought-provoking and poses interesting challenges for an inquisitive mind. Thus, anyone is naturally invited to think about the reasons, causes, perspectives, and, possibly, the ways (if any) of overcoming the Vygotsky-crisis as well as apparently the crisis of the entire field of "cultural-historical psychology". So, consider this entry as a call for discussion; then, who knows, another collective opus magnum might come out, as a result! -- There is nothing more practical than... a good new volume publication! :))
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
It seems, there is no need to reiterate that (a) Vygotsky-Luria's "cultural-historical psychology" was originally conceived as a Marxist psychology project and--judging by the fact it has not been forgotten since then and is still being revisited and discussed in our 21st century (perhaps, unlike any other psychological theory ever produced in that country)--that (b) it was created during the Golden Age in the history of psychology in Russia. Therefore, anyone interested in these issues is invited to get familiarized with a review of the recent edited book, most recently kindly authored and published by Dr. Clay Spinuzzi , gratefully acknowledged for that hereby.
A History of Marxist Psychology: The Golden Age of Soviet Science Edited by Anton Yasnitsky
Pertinent References (and additional reading, if interested):
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
Officially published today, October 26, 2020. -- The case is closed. -- On sale everywhere: if interested, just google-search the title.
Habent sua fata libelli... :)
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
Preamble. This entry is inspired by a relatively recent publication in sciencemag.org (yes, the 'SCIENCE'!) on the topics of scientific impartiality/bias/tendentious analysis; misconduct and cheating; data manipulation/fabrication and scholarly fraud detection; and, finally, publications retraction. Consider here: https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/02/meet-data-thugs-out-expose-shoddy-and-questionable-research
Earlier, our colleague Dr. Tatiana Akhutina challenged us with an introduction into a discussion of these very issues as covered by the works in the "Revisionist revolution in Vygotsky Studies". -- Well done, Dr. Akhutina, the challenge is accepted!
In order to keep the ball rolling, please see relevant publications attached herewith. Then, in the light of the discussion in 'Science' and on the basis of this research, please consider the following QUESTION:
* Does the PUBLICATION of Alexander LURIA (Cognitive development: Its cultural and social foundations, Harvard university press, 1976; edited by Michael Cole) qualify as an example of data MANIPULATION/scholarly FRAUD/scientific MISCONDUCT/else? -- Yes, indeed? Not quite? Partly? Not at all? -- All pros and contras are important and welcome. Everyone is invited to share ideas and join the discussion!
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
OMG! -- The book's apparently on Google Books: https://books.google.com/books?id=wPT6DwAAQBAJ
Well, not the whole book, mostly the preview [ https://books.google.com/books?id=wPT6DwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover ], -- but still, WOW!
Proletarier aller Länder, vereinigt euch!
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added 2 research items
RESUMO Este artigo apresenta um reconhecido psicólogo soviético do Círculo Vigotski–Luria, Aleksei N. Leontiev, traz uma visão geral de suas contribuições para a pesquisa em psicologia e explora a vertente Vigotski–Leontiev–Zinchenko dos estudos psicológicos sobre a memória humana e a recordação. O quadro geral da “ciência do super-homem” vigotskiana como componente da singular ciência soviética de vanguarda também é abordado neste artigo.
RESUMO Este artigo apresenta um reconhecido psicólogo soviético do Círculo Vigotski–Luria, Aleksei N. Leontiev, traz uma visão geral de suas contribuições para a pesquisa em psicologia e explora a vertente Vigotski–Leontiev–Zinchenko dos estudos psicológicos sobre a memória humana e a recordação. O quadro geral da “ciência do super-homem” vigotskiana como componente da singular ciência soviética de vanguarda também é abordado neste artigo.
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
In the meantime, an entirely new project has been conceived:
  • Yasnitsky, A. (Ed.) (2022, forthcoming). Cultural Historical Gestalt Psychology: Historical, Methodological and Theoretical Perspectives
Based on the earlier findings (see attachments; specifically, chapter 9 of the last one attached), it is supposed to really open new perspectives on the history, theory and methodology of psychology as it is practiced these days. Yet, the effort is likely to really miss important matters of relevance to the topic, unless supported by the contributions and further suggestions, -- all these most welcome, of course! --
So, please feel free to respond and secure a safe place for your further scholarly contributions in a forthcoming special online edition on "cultural historical gestalt psychology" and "psychological materialism" of Gestalt Theory. An International Multidisciplinary Journal [ https://content.sciendo.com/view/journals/gth/gth-overview.xml ] ! --
Looking forward to any feedback from all interested parties!
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
If interested, see attached chapter 2 final draft:
Yasnitsky, A. (2020). Sergei Rubinstein as the founder of Soviet Marxist psychology: “Problems of Psychology in the Works of Karl Marx” (1934) and beyond. In: Yasnitsky, A. (Ed.) (2020). A History of Marxist Psychology: The Golden Age of Soviet Science (Routledge/Taylor & Francis).
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
UPDATE on the book production: while the book is already being sold :) -- via the publisher or amazon or elsewhere on the web --
I would like to report that all materials have already passed the stage of COPYEDITING and in a week from now the whole manuscript will swiftly advance to the stage of TYPESETTING.
Which means: we are on the track, everything works smoothly, and the book will meet its eager readers just in a few months from this very moment! :)
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
The launch of a new exciting research and publishing project is being announced. Fresh groundbreaking ideas and open-minded fearless potential contributors are most welcome!
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
Here goes the book's Structure & the Table of Contents:
==================================================
INTRODUCTION
Anton Yasnitsky. A New History of Psychology: Soviet, Russian, Marxist
Part I. THEORY
Chapter 1. Leonid Radzikhovskii. Reminiscence about Future Marxist Psychology: One Hundred Years of Solitude
Chapter 2. Anton Yasnitsky. Sergei Rubinstein as the founder of Soviet Marxist psychology: “Problems of Psychology in the Works of Karl Marx” (1934) and beyond
Part II. PRACTICE
Chapter 3. Grégory Dufaud. Soviet psychohygiene, outpatient psychiatry and international knowledge exchanges
Chapter 4. Andy Byford. Pedology as Occupation in the Early Soviet Union
Part III. DIALOGUES
Chapter 5. Gisele Toassa, Flávia da Silva Ferreira Asbahr, & Marilene Proença Rebello de Souza. The Golden Age of Soviet Psychology in the mirror of contemporary Marxian psychology in Brazil
Chapter 6. Alexandre Métraux. Alexander Luria: Marxist psychologist and transnational scientific broker: A personal account
EPILOGUE
Luciano Nicolás García. Soviet Psychology and its Utopias: Historical Reflections for Current Science
==================================================
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
Book Review
Published: 23 March 2020
Anton Yasnitsky and René van der Veer (eds.): Revisionist revolution in Vygotsky studies
Routledge, London, 2017, 316 pp, $40.95 (paperback), ISBN-10: 1138929697, ISBN-13: 978-1138929692
Andrey Maidansky
Studies in East European Thought (2020)
Abstract
The authors of the volume under review proclaimed a “revisionist revolution” in Vygotsky studies. With the exception of the two chapters by Ekaterina Zavershneva, everything else in the book is written by Anton Yasnitsky—solo or in collaboration with René van der Veer, Eli Lamdan and Jennifer Fraser. It is demonstrated how the “Vygotsky cult” took shape and eventually spread throughout the world, and how the “myths” and “dogmas” of that cult are later subjected to deconstruction. The editors, van der Veer and Yasnitsky, give an overview of Vygotsky’s published works and critically analyze editorial interventions in his texts, mainly in the six-volume Collected Works. The final chapter (Yasnitsky) is devoted to the “birth of the cultural–historical Gestalt psychology,” focusing attention on the story of Vygotsky’s personal contacts with Gestalt psychologists.
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
Dr. Tatiana Akhutina , Luria's former student and definitely an impartial scholar, was kind enough to open the discussion--surprisingly, in RUSSIAN only--of the triumphant mainstream "Revisionist Revolution in Vygotsky Studies" with critical remarks on, in her own words, IGNORANCE, IMPARTIALITY, & TENDENTIOUS ANALYSIS. These are big words, indeed. Well the challenge of "truth and dare" is well taken. Dr. Akhutina makes two main comments, out of which--one relatively minor, the other gross. The remark on the mythological "Vygotsky ban" is dismissed as somewhat naive, premature, and unconvincing. The reader is invited to yet again revisit this topic to the meticulous analysis of Jennifer Frazer (of University of Toronto) and her co-author, where this topic has been sufficiently well covered: Fraser, J. & Yasnitsky, A. (2015). Deconstructing Vygotsky’s Victimization Narrative: A Re-Examination of the "Stalinist Suppression" of Vygotskian Theory. the text is available online in English [ http://individual.utoronto.ca/yasnitsky/texts/Fraser%20&%20Yasnitsky%20(2015).pdf ] and Spanish [ https://vygotski-traducido.blogspot.com/2014/02/fraser-y-yasnitskiy.html ].
The second issue is Luria's trips to Central Asia, including the one with Kurt Koffka. To keep the ball rolling, the reader is invited to reflect on Dr. Akhutina's BIG WORDS in relation to the nice study done by Eli Lamdan and published way back in 2013 under the great title "Who had illusions? Alexander R. Luria’s Central Asian experiments on optical illusions". The critical discussion of the study is mot welcome and definitely way-way long overdue. The paper is available online in English [ http://www.psyanima.su/journal/2013/3/2013n3a4/2013n3a4.2.pdf ] and Russian [ http://www.psyanima.su/journal/2013/3/2013n3a4/2013n3a4.1.pdf ]. The paper originally came out as a contribution to the special issue of a journal on the topic of Luria's expeditions to the Central Asia of 1931, 1932: https://psyanimajournal.livejournal.com/9395.html
In his study, the author eventually comes to the cautious yet unambiguous and somewhat alarming --
===============================================
CONCLUSION
Based on the foregoing, I conclude that Luria’s experimental data on optical illusions does not hold water. The picture is not entirely clear, but it is obvious that both theoretical and ideological assumptions and specific scientific approach influenced Luria's attitude to the data obtained during the second expedition. Apparently, this attitude was the reason that the participation of Koffka in the expedition and the disagreements with him were glossed over, and why we received, many years later, a not entirely quite accurate version of the study. We have not considered here the significance of the political criticism of the expeditions, and we certainly cannot completely deny its influence. But we can say with confidence that it was not the only cause of premature termination of this research project. This small episode in the history of psychology shows us, once again, the extent to which science and ideology are closely linked. Not only in the case of so-called "pseudo-scientists", such as Trofim Denisovich Lysenko, but also in the case of recognized authorities of science, of which Alexander Romanovich Luria undoubtedly was and still is.
===============================================
Enough for now. Everyone welcome to join. Way more input later!
 
Tatiana Akhutina
added a research item
This article is dedicated to the discussion of revisionism in Vygotskian science, an approach developed by Yasnitsky and colleagues and detailed in “‘In August of 1941’: Alexander Luria’s Unknown Letter to the USA in the Light of Revisionist Revolution in the Historiography of Russian Psychology” (Yasnitsky & Lamdan, 2017). The aim of revisionist revolution supporters is a critical analysis of the scientific heritage of Vygotsky, Luria and their colleagues, and the demythologization of Vygotsky’s personality as well as the scientific contribution of his school. In our article, we analyze the shift from “archival revolution” to the revelatory “revisionist revolution” which took place in 2012. The analysis included publications of Yasnitsky and colleagues “[I Wish You Knew From What Stray Matter...]” (2011), “Back to the Future” (2013), “[Kurt Koffka: “Uzbeks Do Have Illiusions!” The Luria – Koffka Controversy]”, “Deconstructing Vygotsky’s Victimization Narrative...” (2015) as well as the paper mentioned in the heading of our article. We describe the advantages and disadvantages of the first two works, and sharply criticize the last three of them. We justify our disagreement with Yasnitsky’s undervaluation of the results of Luria’s Central Asian expeditions. We also refute the assumptions of Yasnitsky and his colleagues (2015, 2017) about the absence of documentary evidence demonstrating that the heritage and name of Vygotsky were under administrative prohibition during the years of Stalinism, and provide corresponding documents. We conclude that ignorance of one group of facts and tendentious analysis of the other, as well as partiality in the discussion, lead Yasnitsky and his colleagues to express a biased perception of psychological science development.
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
Here is an update on Vygotsky Studies and the Vygotskian "Superman Science":
An abstract of a free of charge 'Field Grand Challenge' 2K words paper Yasnitsky, A. (2020). Vygotsky, Revised: Developmental “Superman Science” has been approved by the editors of the Frontiers in Psychology/Education: Educational Psychology @ www.frontiersin.org
ABSTRACT: Vygotsky, Revised: Futurist Avant-Garde Developmental “Superman Science” Anton Yasnitsky (unaffiliated researcher, Toronto, Canada)
Lev Vygotsky (1896-1934) is widely considered as a pioneer of psychology and education and the proponent of the new pathways in human sciences and social practice over at least the last half century and, possibly, in the future. Yet, in the course of the recently pronounced and ongoing “revisionist revolution in Vygotsky Studies” (including “archival revolution”, of course) many postulates of the traditional mainstream “Vygotskiana” underwent considerable criticism and revision (Yasnitsky & van der Veer, 2016). Thus, for instance, contrary to common labels of “cultural-historical” or “socio-historical” theory traditionally associated with Vygotskian legacy, the author of this (albeit unfinished) theory argued that his and his associates’ theory is “not instrumental, not cultural, not significative, not structural, etc.” (Yasnitsky, 2018, p. 85) or, “not instrumental, not cultural, not signifying, not constructive” in an alternative translation (Zavershneva & van der Veer, 2018, p. 121). Many other attributes and terms—such as the “zone of proximal development” (the ZPD), “internalization”, “mediation”, “higher mental (cognitive, psychic) processes”—have been rejected in search for the most adequate definition of what exactly Vygotsky’s theory was all about (Yasnitsky, 2019). Yet, Vygotsky clearly has left a wealth of evidence as for what the core of his theoretical thinking was based upon. In various his texts of the last (and the most productive) decade of his life and work he persistently presented the core drive, the main idea of his innovative theorizing on a “new psychology” using a cluster of words and phrases such as “psychology of superman”, the “new man” of the (implied) Communist future, the “socialist remolding of the man”, and the “height psychology” (in opposition to the “depth psychology” of Sigmund Freud and his followers and the “surface psychology” of predominantly American behaviorism). Cumulatively, all this phraseology has recently been termed, for simplicity’s sake, Vygotsky’s futuristic avant-garde “science of superman” or “superman science”. This (Type D, “Field Grand Challenge”) article problematizes and further discusses the implications of this novel, revisionist interpretation of Vygotsky’s legacy from theoretical, methodological and practical standpoint and from the perspective of its application in the fields of Developmental Psychology and Education.
============================================
To be submitted by early June, 2020 and published in the journal's special issue titled: Historical-Cultural Psychology: The Contributions of Developmental Teaching in Different International Contexts URL: https://www.frontiersin.org/research-topics/11784/historical-cultural-psychology-the-contributions-of-developmental-teaching-in-different-internationa URL of the Author's profile at Frontiers: https://loop.frontiersin.org/people/104012/overview URL of the Author's earlier free 'Opinion Article' publication at Frontiers in Human Neuroscience: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnhum.2013.00509/full
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
Vygotsky: An Intellectual Biography
Posted by: Clay Spinuzzi on Sep 4, 2019
Perhaps, of interest to those, who have not read the whole thing yet and are, possibly, curious to know what the new--and best ever ;)--Vygotsky-biography authored by the " the new world leader in doing careful analytic work on Vygotsky’s heritage " is all about :).
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
An exciting news: the book has been contracted by Routledge/Taylor & Francis and is due by the end of 2019--early 2020. The chapters cover a few main areas such as Revisionist Movement in the Historiography of Russian Psychology, Marxist Philosophy & Theory, Social Practice, and Transnational Perspective on Soviet Marxist Psychology. The team of contributors includes the authors from from three continents represented by Brazil, Canada, France, Great Britain, Switzerland, and even Russian Federation. Critical feedback is most welcome!
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
New project announced: A Marxist Psychology: The Golden Age of Soviet Science . Currently, book project proposal under review.
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
A kind reminder from the publisher:
  • The link to your book will remain valid for 2 more weeks from today, so please do keep sharing !
  • Unique link to share your book:
  • https://rdcu.be/4fov
  • (This link is read online only, and the print/copy/download functions have been disabled.)
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
A free copy of the entire book online is available here:
  • Not downloadable: free online reading only.
  • Temporary: the link is valid for another 50 days only (or so).
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
...and 20% sales discount information.
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
"This is the first thorough coverage of the life and work of this Russian-Jewish scholar since my work with René van der Veer over twenty-five years ago (Understanding Vygotsky, 1991).
Vygotsky’s psychological theories, based on his deep feelings on theatre and literature, continue to fascinate scholars worldwide.
Yasnitsky has clearly emerged as the new world leader in doing careful analytic work on Vygotsky’s heritage."
Jaan Valsiner, Aalborg University, Denmark
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
The "fundamentally novel intellectual biography" that "offers a 21st-century account of the life and times of Lev Vygotsky" has appeared on the publisher's and amazon web sites; scheduled to come out in mid-June, 2018, hard cover & paperback. See details:
 
Marie-Cécile Bertau
added an update
This article reconsiders Vygotsky's notion of interiorization. First, it intends to clarify Vygotsky's own understandings and struggles of interiorization. Second, replacing the container spaces external - internal by a series of three movements lead by dialogical continuity, it develops the concept in a language-dialogical way.
Full PDF available.
Reference:
Bertau, M-C., Karsten, A. (2018). Reconsidering interiorization: Self moving across language spacetimes. New Ideas in Psychology, 49, 7-17. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.newideapsych.2017.12.001
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
In just two weeks the newest, the most unconventional, arguably the first rigorously academic and, thus, the best intellectual biography of Lev Vygotsky will be submitted to press. --
In the meantime, the Vygotsky bubble keeps shrinking and, as predicted a couple years ago, Vygotsky's fame seems to keep declining: https://psyanimajournal.livejournal.com/15934.html . --
If only Google Books, Google Scholar and NGram are to be trusted as reliable tools of scientific research, that is.
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
Blog entry summary: it seems, pretty much like a year ago, I have two news for you, the good and the bad one :).
The good one: Vygotsky is at the peak of his popularity! Hey, hey, guys!! :) The bad one: yeah, but the trend has definitely changed and Vygotsky appears to have *already* passed the peak in 2017 and, ouch, has *already* started his inadvertent and imminent decline. Ooooops! :))
The Vygotsky Bubble seems to have been proven & confirmed! QED ;)
For further explanations, links and details with numerical values see the source:
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
Sad news: our contributor, the great Vyacheslav Vs. Ivánov passed away today. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vyacheslav_Ivanov_(philologist)
Good news: the front-matter of the book is available online: attached as well as here--http://assets.cambridge.org/97805217/62694/frontmatter/9780521762694_frontmatter.pdf
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
The celebrated "zone of proximal development"! One of the chapters from Section 'Method' of the handbook covers the topic:
Encountering the border: Vygotsky's zona blizhaishego razvitiia and its implications for theories of development
by equally celebrated
Jaan Valsiner and René Van der Veer
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
UPDATE
Starting March 23, 2017 (i.e. today) the handbook is also available in a paperback edition (i.e. relatively cheaper and more accessible than before); e.g. see:
OR
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
PROJECT REVIEWS (by Jerome Bruner, Mike Cole & Elkhonon Goldberg)
  • "What a wide-ranging view of the comprehensive subject of mind-culture-neurology! It serves a real purpose both pedagogically and in the scholarly sense."
Jerome Bruner, Professor Emeritus, New York University
  • "Anyone interested in the ideas of Vygotsky and his legacies will find this book a rich source of information and inspiration."
Michael Cole, Distinguished Professor Emeritus, University of California, San Diego
  • "Lev Semyonovich Vygotsky was among the most seminal psychologists of the twentieth century. This excellent volume is a fitting tribute to Vygotsky and a testimony to the fact that his theory of "cultural-historical psychology" is alive and well and continues to influence many strands of psychology worldwide."
Elkhonon Goldberg, Ph.D., author of The Executive Brain, The Wisdom Paradox, and The New Executive Brain
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
Another 'Brain' section chapter, the author's proofs of his deliberately [thought-]provocative piece titled
There can be no cultural-historical psychology without neuropsychology.
And vice versa
by Aaro Toomela:
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
One of the three 'Brain' section chapters:
Cultural-historical theory and cultural neuropsychology today
Bella Kotik-Friedgut and Alfredo Ardila
Attached below:
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added an update
Ekaterina Zavershneva's chapter, from 'Theory" section, titled
The problem of consciousness in Vygotsky's cultural-historical psychology
pdf below.
For more on the author and the list of her bibliography see:
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added a project goal
The field of cultural-historical psychology originated in the work of Lev Vygotsky and the Vygotsky Circle in the Soviet Union more than eighty years ago, and has now established a powerful research tradition in Russia and the West. The Cambridge Handbook of Cultural-Historical Psychology is the first volume to systematically present cultural-historical psychology as an integrative/holistic developmental science of mind, brain, and culture. Its main focus is the inseparable unity of the historically evolving human mind, brain, and culture, and the ways to understand it. The contributors are major international experts in the field, and include authors of major works on Lev Vygotsky, direct collaborators and associates of Alexander Luria, and renowned neurologist Oliver Sacks. The Handbook will be of interest to students and scholars in the fields of psychology, education, humanities and neuroscience.
* The most detailed account to date of the scientific legacies of Russian scholars, Lev Vygotsky and Alexander Luria
* Discusses the interplay between cultural-historical psychology and other disciplines, both well-established and newly emerging ones alike
* Features a concluding chapter on 'romantic science' by best-selling author, neurologist and scholar, Oliver Sacks
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added 2 research items
Introduction This chapter invites the reader to look at the ideas and notions that formed cultural-historical psychology. This will be done with a particular interest in Vygotsky’s thinking about language and hence with an explicit focus on language activity. We think that this specific approach will shed some light on the whole Vygotskian enterprise, and, consequently, on cultural-historical psychology as a framework. Looking at the “conceptual volume” of cultural-historical psychology, we will consider the historical threads the theory took up and developed from former times, and specifically, from German culture and language. It is noteworthy that German in these times – around the turn of the twentieth century – was a highly valued language, internationally used in science, and also esteemed in literary works of art. Thus, it was common for many scholars in Russia to be fluent readers of German, and we can assume a vivid exchange of ideas within the European intellectual landscape. Specifically, we can speak of a migration of concepts. This certainly holds true for the notion of inner form that we think belongs to one of the most important theories concerning language in a cultural-historical framework, namely interiorization and the relationship between word and thought. Wilhelm von Humboldt’s language philosophy, which included this notion, had a seminal influence on Russian thinking about language (van der Veer, 1996; Zinchenko, 2007; Bertau, 2011a). It was Aleksandr Potebnia who was the main transmitter of Humboldt’s ideas to the East, and the generation of scholars active in the first decades of the twentieth century – Yakubinsky, Vološinov, Vygotsky, Bakhtin – all knew Potebnia’s works, they were part of the vivid discussion of a dynamic conception of language and its consequences for theories in literature and psychology. That is, the basic idea of language as activity and the dialogue as the starting phenomenon to conceive language are to be found in Humboldt and the Russians.
Introduction The present volume thoroughly examines the most central ideas and concepts of cultural-historical theory, its method, its application to several developmental and therapeutic domains, and its expansion into different paradigms, such as cognitive science and dialogism. This programmatic essay aims to invite readers to go a step further toward developing a concept and a practice of scientific research about the complexities of human beings and human life. Note that this step forward relates back to the past – to Vygotsky and his collaborators’ quest for an integrative human science (Yasnitsky, 2011a). This integrative science involves human cultural and biosocial development and thus goes beyond the dualism of physiological versus psychological aspects (i.e. mindless body, or disembodied mind). For us, this integrative idea is interesting and we take it to be one of the main contributions of the Vygotsky Circle. It is an idea still needed in these times of even greater disciplinary fragmentation than in the early twentieth century; a fragmentation that not only builds taken-for-granted divisions into phenomena like language, consciousness, mind, body, and activity, but also reduces these phenomena to notions and frameworks specific to particular disciplines.
Anton Yasnitsky
added a research item
If 27 years of prison have done anything to us, it was to use the silence of solitude to make us understand how precious words are and how real speech is in its impact on the way people live and die. Nelson Mandela (2011, p. 274) At the center of Vygotsky’s cultural-historical psychology is the fact that human beings are distinguished by their capacity for signification, that is their ability to use signs (words) in order to make meaning. Not only do we experience sensations and produce actions in the world but we also attempt to understand and explain our actions and experiences as well as the actions of others and other things. This bundle of interconnected human attributes that include meaning, understanding, and explaining is what we commonly call consciousness (or self-consciousness) and it is this distinctive human quality that Vygotsky designated as the object of study for the discipline of psychology. There is no better place to begin an account of Vygotsky’s cultural-historical psychology than with the words with which he ended his book, Thinking and speech (1987, p. 285), that were written a few months before his untimely death. Consciousness is reflected in the word like the sun is reflected in a droplet of water. The word is a microcosm of consciousness, related to consciousness like a living cell is related to an organism, like an atom is related to the cosmos. The meaningful word is a microcosm of human consciousness.
Anton Yasnitsky
added 3 research items
In the autobiography that Luria wrote in the last years of his life, in which he put a whole lifetime, and a lifetime's work, in perspective, the final chapter is entitled "Romantic Science." It is crucial to bring out at the onset that Luria's preoccupation with "Romantic Science" was not superficial, or a late development, an idiosyncrasy, or extraneous to the wisdom of science that animated him from his earliest work to his last. Luria wrote his autobiography, 'The making of mind', in 1977, but his first book—a critique of psychoanalysis—was written in 1922. A lifetime of expansion and evolution separates these two works, but the vision of science—a complex and (it might seem) contradictory vision—remained constant, and at the heart of his work, throughout these fifty-five years. And yet, despite Luria's own words on the matter—which he expressed not only in his published works, but in innumerate letters to colleagues and friends—there has been a persistent tendency to regard Luria's "romantic" works and preoccupations as light and superficial, scarcely deserving serious scientific and intellectual attention, or even to ignore them altogether. This essay, then, is written to redress this imbalance, to remind readers of the extraordinary complexity and richness of Luria's work and worldview, and of how vital the "romantic" was in his lifetime in science.
Introduction Dynamic assessment (DA) is a rapidly growing trend in psychological, educational, and language research and practice (Haywood and Lidz, 2007; Sternberg and Grigorenko, 2002). The key element of all DA approaches is the belief that evaluation of individual learning potential is no less important than testing the current performance level, and that the best way of doing this is to insert learning and/or interactive elements into the assessment procedure. The goal of this chapter is to identify the main conceptual aspects of DA and to elaborate the relationships between various DA approaches and the Vygotskian theoretical tradition. The chapter starts with a brief introduction to early attempts to challenge the predominantly static approach to assessment associated with the intelligence-testing tradition. Then the role of Vygotsky’s notion of the Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) in shaping DA approaches is discussed together with an elaboration of the different paths taken in Russia and the West by the DA concept. The diversity of current DA approaches is reviewed and some main conceptual problems identified. The recurring theme throughout the chapter is the question of the not-so-simple relationships between the processes of learning and problem solving.
Consciousness is one of the most “inconvenient” objects of psychological research. It is so evasive and idiosyncratic that the investigation of consciousness can be compared with the study of the footprints that appear on the sand at the beach and are immediately washed away. One cannot “touch,” “weigh,” or “capture” consciousness – and not only so because consciousness is ever changing. Psychology, as well as philosophy, keeps wondering whether consciousness as a phenomenon exists as such. If it is only a sum of other psychological processes or a side effect, an epiphenomenon, that accompanies such processes, then the legitimacy of the quest for the specific characteristics of consciousness is fairly questionable. Indeed, is it worthwhile to create a theory of something that does not exist?
René van der Veer
added an update
This is not my project
 
Anton Yasnitsky
added 2 research items
The field of cultural-historical psychology originated in the work of Lev Vygotsky and the Vygotsky Circle in the Soviet Union more than eighty years ago, and has now established a powerful research tradition in Russia and the West. The Cambridge Handbook of Cultural-Historical Psychology is the first volume to systematically present cultural-historical psychology as an integrative/holistic developmental science of mind, brain, and culture. Its main focus is the inseparable unity of the historically evolving human mind, brain, and culture, and the ways to understand it. The contributors are major international experts in the field, and include authors of major works on Lev Vygotsky, direct collaborators and associates of Alexander Luria, and renowned neurologist Oliver Sacks. The handbook will be of interest to students and scholars in the fields of psychology, education, humanities and neuroscience. * The most detailed account to date of the scientific legacies of Russian scholars, Lev Vygotsky and Alexander Luria * Discusses the interplay between cultural-historical psychology and other disciplines, well-established and newly emerging ones alike * Features a concluding chapter on 'romantic science' by best-selling author, neurologist and scholar, Oliver Sacks REVIEWS & ENDORSEMENTS "What a wide-ranging view of the comprehensive subject of mind-culture-neurology! It serves a real purpose both pedagogically and in the scholarly sense." Jerome Bruner, Professor Emeritus, New York University Source: http://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/psychology/developmental-psychology/cambridge-handbook-cultural-historical-psychology
The field of cultural-historical psychology originated in the work of Lev Vygotsky and the Vygotsky Circle in the Soviet Union more than eighty years ago, and has now established a powerful research tradition in Russia and the West. The Cambridge Handbook of Cultural-Historical Psychology is the first volume to systematically present cultural-historical psychology as an integrative/holistic developmental science of mind, brain, and culture. Its main focus is the inseparable unity of the historically evolving human mind, brain, and culture, and the ways to understand it. The contributors are major international experts in the field, and include authors of major works on Lev Vygotsky, direct collaborators and associates of Alexander Luria, and renowned neurologist Oliver Sacks. The handbook will be of interest to students and scholars in the fields of psychology, education, humanities and neuroscience. * The most detailed account to date of the scientific legacies of Russian scholars, Lev Vygotsky and Alexander Luria * Discusses the interplay between cultural-historical psychology and other disciplines, well-established and newly emerging ones alike * Features a concluding chapter on 'romantic science' by best-selling author, neurologist and scholar, Oliver Sacks