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CRIMPREV

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Gorazd Mesko
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The author discusses the role of criminologists and criminology in processes of making crime control policy. He focuses oil the problem of the social control Culture, transfer of policies, strategies, and practices of social control in contemporary society. There are many Cultures of crime control - the most "attractive" and the "best selling" is the American one, which is accompanied by the British and followed by others which more or less (with a delay) imitate or modify the originals. The author discusses problems of transfer of crime control policies, experiences, challenges of comparative criminology and the meaning of a specific (crime) control policy and political culture. Travelling institutions, travelling ideas, actors in such transfers of ideas, knowledge, ideas, concepts and comprehension of crime control policies by practitioners are the gist of the author's interest. The marginal role of criminologists in making the majority of contemporary crime control policies is emphasised. Moreover, criminologists are often perceived as an obstacle in crime control policy making. The author emphasises the importance of a critical but constructive role of criminologists in the making of crime control policies, strategies and practices, as well as a high quality of analysis of crime control practices of contemporary society.
Gorazd Mesko
added 3 research items
Theorizing about the fear of crime is one of the main activities of contemporary research in the field of international criminology. The research on variations in fear levels has been dominated by sociological, socio-demographic variables, and social-psychological models of fear of crime. This article uses multiple regression techniques in order to examine these variables to compare fear of crime in two central European capitals: Ljubljana, Slovenia and Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Sarajevo was found to be more fearful overall than Ljubljana. This difference may be explained by differences in the roles of the two cultures in the war of the former Yugoslavia. The current article focuses on differences in culture (e.g., status of women and self-estimation) as well as post-war conditions such as economics, social deprivation, and disorganization in order to explain differing levels of fear of crime.