Project

CONNECT COST ACTION-EU CA19127

Goal: CONNECT aims to coordinate research on cognitive impairment in CKD. This requires exchanging clinical information between nephrologists and neurologists, and between neuroscientists and kidney physiologists, guided by big data analysts. This collaborative network will define new experimental paradigms, their translational value and, in turn, focus on new interventions in the field of cognitive impairment.
At the core of this COST Action lie activities that bridge the gaps between these fields and prepare early-stage researchers and clinicians to start new research lines. The interdisciplinary consortium from 22 countries will focus on 1) Pre-clinical research, 2) Clinical trials, 3) clinical practice, 4) Data management and analytics, and 5) Inclusiveness and dissemination of the Action. This COST Action will alleviate disparities in CKD patient care and enable breakthrough research enabling patient diagnosis and early treatments.

www.connectcost.eu
https://www.cost.eu/actions/CA19127/#tabs|Name:overview

Date: 12 October 2020 - 11 October 2024

Updates
0 new
7
Recommendations
0 new
3
Followers
0 new
13
Reads
1 new
254

Project log

Gaye Hafez
added an update
HERE IS THE SECOND STSM CALL FOR SUBMISSION OF PROPOSALS
For Missions occurring until 30 October 2022
Deadline for submission: 30 September 2022
It is an amazing opportunity for researchers to spend time in a European lab/hospital on brain-kidney topic. For details:
 
Gaye Hafez
added an update
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION: 19 MAY 2022
Conference Grants (up to 1500 Euro) are aimed at supporting PhD students, PhD candidates, and postdocs Early Career Investigators (ECI) researchers from Participating Inclusiveness Target Countries (ITC*) to attend international science and technology related conferences not specifically organized by the COST Action. At this open call, we will award persons that will present an abstract at the 59th ERA Congress 2022(poster or oral).
* ITC (Inclusiveness Target Countries): Albania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Croatia, Greece, Hungary, Lithuania, Latvia, Malta, Moldova, Montenegro, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia, Slovakia, Republic of North Macedonia, Republic of Serbia, and Turkey.
Contact person: Ana Carina Ferreira
 
Gaye Hafez
added an update
CONNECTing the kidney to brain dysfunction: from animal models to clinical practice
Sponsored by COST Action CA19127-Cognitive Decline in Nephro-Neurology : European Cooperative Target (CONNECT)
 
Gaye Hafez
added a research item
Kidney function has two important elements: glomerular filtration and tubular function (secretion and reabsorption). A persistent decrease in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), with or without proteinuria, is diagnostic of chronic kidney disease (CKD). While glomerular injury or disease is a major cause of CKD and usually associated with proteinuria, predominant tubular injury, with or without tubulointerstitial disease, is typically non-proteinuric. CKD has been linked with cognitive impairment, but it is unclear how much this depends on a reduced GFR, altered tubular function or the presence of proteinuria. Since CKD is often accompanied by tubular and interstitial dysfunction, we explore here for the first time the potential role of the tubular and tubulointerstitial compartments in cognitive dysfunction. To help address this issue, we have selected a group of primary tubular diseases with preserved GFR, in which to review the evidence for any association with brain dysfunction. Cognition, mood, neurosensory, and motor disturbances are not well characterized in tubular diseases, possibly because they are subclinical and less prominent than other clinical manifestations. The available literature suggests that brain dysfunction in tubular and tubulointerstitial diseases is usually mild and is more often seen in disorders of water handling. Brain dysfunction may occur when severe electrolyte and water disorders in young children persist over a long period of time before the diagnosis is made. We have chosen as examples to highlight this topic, Bartter and Gitelman syndromes and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. We discuss current published findings, some unanswered questions, and propose topics for future research.
Gaye Hafez
added a research item
Kidney dysfunction can profoundly influence many organ systems, and recent evidence suggests a potential role for increased albuminuria in the development of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia. Epidemiological studies conducted in different populations have demonstrated that the presence of increased albuminuria is associated with a higher relative risk of MCI or dementia both in cross-sectional analyses and in studies with long-term follow-up. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of albuminuria’s effect are as yet insufficiently studied, with several important knowledge gaps still present in a complex relationship with other MCI and dementia risk factors. Both the kidney and the brain have microvascular similarities that make them sensitive to endothelial dysfunction involving different mechanisms, including oxidative stress and inflammation. The exact substrate of MCI and dementia is still under investigation, however available experimental data indicate that elevated albuminuria and low glomerular filtration rate are associated with significant neuroanatomical declines in hippocampal function and grey matter volume. Thus, albuminuria may be critical in the development of cognitive impairment and its progression to dementia. In this review, we summarize the available evidence on albuminuria’s link to MCI and dementia, point to existing gaps in our knowledge and suggest actions to overcome them. The major question of whether interventions that target increased albuminuria could prevent cognitive decline remains unanswered. Our recommendations for future research are aimed at helping to plan clinical trials and to solve the complex conundrum outlined in this review, with the ultimate goal of improving the lives of patients with chronic kidney disease.
Gaye Hafez
added 4 research items
Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a 36-amino-acid peptide member of a family also including peptide YY and pancreatic polypeptide which are all ligands to Gi/Go coupled receptors. NPY regulates several fundamental biologic functions including appetite/satiety, sex and reproduction, learning and memory, cardiovascular and renal function and the immune function. The mesenteric circulation is a major source of NPY in the blood in man and this peptide is considered a key regulator of the gut-brain cross-talk. A progressive rise in circulating NPY accompanies the progression of CKD toward kidney failure and NPY robustly predicts cardiovascular events in this population. Furthermore, NPY is suspected as a possible player in the accelerated cognitive function decline and dementia in patients with CKD and in dialysis patients. In theory, Interfering with the NPY system has relevant potential for the treatment of diverse diseases from cardiovascular and renal diseases to diseases of the central nervous system. Pharmaceutical formulations for effective drug delivery and cost as well as the complexity of diseases potentially addressable by NPY/NPY antagonists have been a problem until now. This in part explains the slow progress of knowledge about the NPY system in the clinical arena. There is now a renewed research interest on the NPY system in psycho pharmacology and in pharmacology in general and new studies and a new breed of clinical trials may eventually bring the expected benefits in human health by drugs interfering with this system.
Neurocognitive disorders are frequent among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Identifying and characterizing cognitive impairment (CI) can help to assess the ability of adherence to CKD risk reduction strategy, identify potentially reversible causes of cognitive decline, modify pharmacotherapy, educate the patient and caregiver and provide appropriate patient and caregiver support. Numerous factors are associated with the development and progression of CI in CKD patients and various conditions can influence the results of cognitive assessment in these patients. Here we review clinical warning signs that should lead to cognitive screening; conditions frequent in CKD at risk to interfere with cognitive testing or performance, including specificities of cognitive assessment in dialysis patients or after kidney transplantation; and available tests for screening and observed cognitive patterns in CKD patients.
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) perturbs the crosstalk with others organs, with the interaction between the kidneys and the heart having been studied most intensively. However, a growing body of data indicates that there is an association between kidney dysfunction and disorders of the central nervous system. In epidemiological studies, CKD is associated with a high prevalence of neurological complications, such as cerebrovascular disorders, movement disorders, cognitive impairment and depression. Along with traditional cardiovascular risk factors (such as diabetes, inflammation, hypertension and dyslipidaemia), non-traditional risk factors related to kidney damage (such as uraemic toxins) may predispose patients with CKD to neurological disorders. There is increasing evidence to show that uraemic toxins, for example indoxyl sulphate, have a neurotoxic effect. A better understanding of factors responsible for the elevated prevalence of neurological disorders among patients with CKD might facilitate the development of novel treatments. Here, we review (i) the potential clinical impact of CKD on cerebrovascular and neurological complications, (ii) the mechanisms underlying the uraemic toxins’ putative action (based on pre-clinical and clinical research) and (iii) the potential impact of these findings on patient care.
Gaye Hafez
added an update
Deadline for application: 1 October 2021
Conference Grants (up to 1500 Euro) are aimed at supporting PhD students and postdocs Early Career Investigators (ECI) researchers from Participating Inclusiveness Target Countries (ITC*) to attend international science and technology related conferences not specifically organized by the COST Action. The applicant must present an abstract at the congress (poster or oral). The congress must be held by the end of October 2021.
* ITC (Inclusiveness Target Countries): Albania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Croatia, Hungary, Lithuania, Latvia, Luxembourg, Malta, Moldova, Montenegro, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia, Slovakia, Republic of North Macedonia, Republic of Serbia and Turkey.
For details please visit our website: www.connectcost.eu
Contact person:
 
Gaye Hafez
added an update
First Call for Short Term Scientific Mission (STSM) applications within the COST Action “Cognitive decline in Nephro-Neurology: European Cooperative Target (CONNECT)”
For Missions occurring until 30 October 2021.
Deadline for submission: 30 August
Expected date of notification of application outcome: Up to two weeks from receiving the application
All STSM activities must occur in their entirety until the date specified above.
All submitted STSM applications will be decided upon on a first-come-first-serve basis depending on available funds.
Applications submitted after the deadline will be subject to individual assessment and will be taken into consideration depending on finances available.
For more details visit our website:
 
Gaye Hafez
added an update
Our website is open, follow us.
 
Gaye Hafez
added a project goal
CONNECT aims to coordinate research on cognitive impairment in CKD. This requires exchanging clinical information between nephrologists and neurologists, and between neuroscientists and kidney physiologists, guided by big data analysts. This collaborative network will define new experimental paradigms, their translational value and, in turn, focus on new interventions in the field of cognitive impairment.
At the core of this COST Action lie activities that bridge the gaps between these fields and prepare early-stage researchers and clinicians to start new research lines. The interdisciplinary consortium from 22 countries will focus on 1) Pre-clinical research, 2) Clinical trials, 3) clinical practice, 4) Data management and analytics, and 5) Inclusiveness and dissemination of the Action. This COST Action will alleviate disparities in CKD patient care and enable breakthrough research enabling patient diagnosis and early treatments.