Project

COASTAL: Collaborative Land-Sea Integration Platform (H2020 Project)

Goal: Funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme COASTAL is a research and innovation project, a unique multi-actor collaboration of coastal and rural business entrepreneurs, administrations, stakeholders, and natural and social science experts to formulate and evaluate business solutions and policy recommendations aimed at improving the coastal-rural synergy to foster rural and coastal development while preserving the environment.

Coordinated by VITO (Belgium) the consortium includes 29 partners from 9 countries. Further information can be found on the project website: https://h2020-coastal.eu/

This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under Grant Agreement No 773782.

Date: 1 May 2018 - 30 April 2022

Updates
0 new
1
Recommendations
0 new
0
Followers
0 new
26
Reads
0 new
389

Project log

Joris de Vente
added a research item
The advanced state of land degradation worldwide urges the large-scale adoption of sustainable land management (SLM). Social learning is considered an important precondition for the adoption of innovative and contextualized SLM. Involving farmers and researchers in participatory monitoring and evaluation (PM&E) of innovative SLM such as regenerative agriculture is expected to enable social learning. Although there is a growing body of literature asserting the achievement of social learning through participatory processes, social learning has been loosely defined, sparsely assessed, and only partially covered when measured. Here, we assess how PM&E of regenerative agriculture, involving local farmers and researchers in southeast Spain, enabled social learning, effectively increasing knowledge exchange and shared understanding of regenerative agriculture effects among participating farmers. We measured whether social learning occurred by covering its social-cognitive (perceptions) and social-relational (social networks) dimensions, and discussed the potential of PM&E to foster SLM adoption and out-scaling. We used fuzzy cognitive mapping and social network analysis as graphical semiquantitative methods to assess changes in farmers' perceptions and shared fluxes of information on regenerative agriculture over approximately three years. Our results show that PM&E enabled social learning among participating farmers, who strengthened and enlarged their social networks for information sharing and presented a more complex and broader shared understanding of regenerative agriculture effects and benefits than pre PM&E. We argue that PM&E thereby creates crucial preconditions for SLM adoption and out-scaling. Our findings are relevant for the design of PM&E processes, living labs, and landscape restoration initiatives that aim to support farmers' adoption and out-scaling of innovative and contextualized SLM.
Luminita Lazar
added 2 research items
To reach the global aspiration of 17 ambitious SDGs, local realities must be integrated. Often, models are developed based on quantitative statistical data sources from databases on environmental indicators or economics to assess how a given SDG can be achieved. This process however removes the local realities from the equation. How can you best include stakeholders in this mathematical modelling processes distanced from their local realities, though, and ensure higher probability of future compliance with top-down global decisions that may have local consequences once implemented? When researching stakeholder involvement and their ability to form public policy, their opinions often get reported as a single assessment, like counting the fish in the ocean once and stating that as a permanent result. Too seldom do stakeholders get invited back and given the opportunity to validate results and allow researchers to adjust their models based on on-the-ground validation or change requests. We tested the full integration of stakeholders in the modelling process of environmental topics in six different case areas across Europe, with each area holding six sectoral and one inter-sectoral workshops. In these workshops, the scope of the issues relevant to the stakeholders was driven by first the sectoral priorities of the given sector, followed by a merging of issues. In this process, we were able to identify what the commonalities between different sectors were and where synergies lay in terms of governance paths. These results were then returned to the stakeholders in a mixed session where they were able to come with feedback and advice on the results researchers presented, so that the models reflected more closely the perceptions of the regional actors. We present these methods and reflect on the challenges and opportunities of using this deep-integration method to integrate qualitative data from stakeholder inclusion in a quantitative model.
Jean-Philippe Terreaux
added a research item
L'eutrophisation des écosystèmes aquatiques est un processus fonctionnel qui est enclenché en réponse à un apport excessif de nutriments dans les cours d'eau. Ces phénomènes entraînent des perturbations des écosystèmes, impactent les biens et les services associés, et ont désormais un coût qui en font un enjeu politique majeur. Dans cet article nous présentons les principaux enseignements, sur les aspects économiques, issus d'un travail bibliographique associant quatre centres de recherche en France, afin de guider la décision publique dans le but de diminuer cette pollution de l'eau. Analyser les expériences passées, et les résultats de travaux de modélisation récents permet d'éviter différents écueils et de se focaliser sur des solutions efficientes.
Caitriona Carter
added a research item
Can medium-sized ports become political actors governing the ecological transition of land-sea territorial interdependencies - and not just the port?
Caitriona Carter
added an update
Here is a poster from the COASTAL project presented at
The CHEERS conference – “Global CHanges and Estuarine and coastal systems functioning: innovativE appRoaches and assessment toolS”
4 November 2019 to 8 November 2019
 
Jean-Philippe Terreaux
added 2 research items
The notion of drought is most often associated with the aridity of landscapes and vegetation. But a green landscape can hide a frequent imbalance between water availability and the quantity necessary to maintain rivers in a suitable state, to satisfy different water needs. This is the case, for example, in the French region called New Aquitaine. Regularly, "drought" crisis committees are set up there to limit water use through administrative constraints, which is technically difficult and costly for many, and with an overall unsatisfactory situation from rural areas to the coast. But in summer, water consumption is mainly due to irrigation. Some water resource managers have consequently set up an original non-linear water pricing system for irrigation to achieve several objectives: above all, to limit water consumption in order to respect a minimum flow rate in rivers, to anticipate water supply-demand imbalances before agricultural plantations are made, to allocate water to the users who value it best, to recover water supply costs, to be transparent and sufficiently simple in its application to be acceptable. In this chapter, we propose to describe one of such original pricing systems, as well as some of its main mathematical properties and its practical interests.
The notion of drought is most often associated with the aridity of landscapes and vegetation. But a green landscape can hide a frequent imbalance between water availability and the quantity necessary to maintain rivers in a suitable state, to satisfy different water needs. This is the case, for example, in the French region called New Aquitaine. Regularly, “drought” crisis committees are set up there to limit water use through administrative constraints, which is technically difficult and costly for many, and with an overall unsatisfactory situation from rural areas to the coast. But in summer, water consumption is mainly due to irrigation. Some water resource managers have consequently set up an original non-linear water pricing system for irrigation to achieve several objectives: above all, to limit water consumption in order to respect a minimum flow rate in rivers, to anticipate water supply-demand imbalances before agricultural plantations are made, to allocate water to the users who value it best, to recover water supply costs, to be transparent and sufficiently simple in its application to be acceptable. In this chapter, we propose to describe one of such original pricing systems, as well as some of its main mathematical properties and its practical interests.
Javier Martínez-López
added a research item
Many Mediterranean coastal areas encounter similar problems and gaps between science, governance, and implementation of sustainable management at local-regional scales. There is often a lack of coordination between management of inland and coastal areas, and a lack of integrated land-sea data and knowledge exchange to support transitions towards sustainable development and synergies between rural and coastal areas. In this paper, we illustrate the main challenges to reach a sustainable development of coastal-rural areas related to data availability, knowledge exchange and governance, which could be tackled by coupling regional and international research infrastructures (RIs) with scientific and stakeholder collaboration networks to facilitate knowledge exchange and co-creation of solutions. We first identified the main challenges in sustainable development of coastal-rural areas followed by a review of major existing RIs, scientific knowledge and collaboration networks that can help support integrated management of Mediterranean coastal zones. Based on this, we developed recommendations for a better integration of RIs and collaboration networks in the management of coastal-rural areas, including (1) the creation of local networks to facilitate periodical meetings between all sectors involved and to connect science and policy actors and (2) setting up local RIs that support the data processing and the use of regional and international RIs by scientists and policy stakeholders.
Samaneh Seifollahi-Aghmiuni
added 2 research items
Multiple change pressures from human activities and from climate variability and change affect water systems on land and at the coast and sea. Changes in these water systems in turn affect and feedback to multiple societal and ecosystem conditions and risks, e.g., for: water security and safety; food and energy security; human, animal and ecosystem health; and drought, flood and general climate-change mitigation/adaptation. Compound events with high societal and ecosystem impacts may result from various combinations of these water-related pressures and interactions. As a starting contribution to the European COST Action DAMOCLES, this study addresses the questions of: Which water-related compound events are most relevant for stakeholders? How much is currently known, by scientists and various stakeholders, about the multiple underlying variables and their inter-linkages for these events? What novel approaches can be used to ensure continuous stakeholder engagement?Using a “source-to-sea water-link” case study in the Baltic region, specifically the relatively well-studied Swedish Norrström drainage basin and its adjacent and surrounding coastal areas and associated marine basin of the Baltic Sea, we apply a participatory approach to conceptual model building, involving relevant stakeholders for the land,coast and sea aspects of linked water-related pressures, changes and impacts, and their interactions. Use of this participatory approach can increase understanding of how stakeholders from different sectors view and think about these interactions, and facilitate collaborative exploration of cross-sectoral cooperation opportunities for research,applications and innovations regarding water-related high-impact compound events. As a main part of the study and its approach application, six workshops have been held with stakeholders from different land, coast and sea sectors. In these, mind maps and causal loop diagrams have been co-created by the involved stakeholders and scientists for key land-coast-sea interactions under climate change and socio-economic developments to identify associated connections among sectors with potential high social and environmental impacts. A main aim of this co-creation process is to identify and eventually model and quantify the main dynamic cause-effect links for these interactions and impacts. We here report and analyze the resulting mind maps and causal loop diagrams, and their similarities and differences, as co-created in the sector workshops based on their different focus themes and stakeholder perspectives. In synthesis, we also discuss the causal loop diagram implications for further systems modelling and quantification of key water-related compound events and their impacts.
The Baltic Sea coast is subject to multiple change pressures from human activities and climate change on land and at sea. These pressures challenge ecosystems and socio-economic development options in coastal areas. Understanding the pressure implications for coastal system settings is needed for relevant policy and management at different levels. In this study, we consider the Swedish Northern Baltic Proper coast and have involved actors with land, sea and coastal perspectives to collaboratively explore the potential of cross-sectoral cooperation for sustainable coastal development. Six sectoral workshops have been held to co-create mind maps for land-sea interactions and identify (and eventually model) key physical, socio-economic and environmental connections for this development. We here report the mind maps and insights provided for the interlinked land-coast-sea processes, and discuss their implications for further modelling of the coastal system and the opportunities and barriers for its sustainable development locally and regionally.
Katalin Balázs
added a project goal
Funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme COASTAL is a research and innovation project, a unique multi-actor collaboration of coastal and rural business entrepreneurs, administrations, stakeholders, and natural and social science experts to formulate and evaluate business solutions and policy recommendations aimed at improving the coastal-rural synergy to foster rural and coastal development while preserving the environment.
Coordinated by VITO (Belgium) the consortium includes 29 partners from 9 countries. Further information can be found on the project website: https://h2020-coastal.eu/
This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under Grant Agreement No 773782.