Project

CIDAR - Combustion species Imaging Diagnostics for Aero-engine Research

Goal: The CIDAR project is the result of a Consortium formed by Academic Parties (Manchester, Strathclyde and Edinburgh Universities), a Research and Development Organization (INTA) and private companies (DAS Photonics and OptoSci). Therefore, CIDAR builds upon the expertise of the UK's and Spain’s world-leading groups in fibre-lasers, laser based gas and particulate detection, opto-electronics, and chemical species tomography (CST), allied to its industrial strengths in aero-engine manufacture and aviation fuel technology.

The CIDAR project aims to establish a world-leading capability in the non-intrusive measurement and 2D imaging of nvPM/soot and CO2 concentrations in aero-engine exhaust. Non-intrusive planar tomographic measurement of CO2 will be based on calibration-free Fibre-Laser Absorption Spectroscopy and soot measurements will be based on laser-induced incandescence (LII).

Validation of both imaging technologies will be carried out at the INTA Turbojet Test Centre using large civil turbofan engines, providing data analysis and measurement uncertainty of the current state of the art measurement systems.
The measurement system will then be developed to a maturity level of TRL6 with a clearly identified route to commercialisation.

This project has received funding from the Clean Sky 2 Joint Undertaking under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 785539.

Project website: www.cidar.eu

Date: 1 March 2018 - 31 August 2021

Updates
0 new
0
Recommendations
0 new
0
Followers
0 new
20
Reads
1 new
328

Project log

Chang Liu
added a research item
Chemical Species Tomography (CST) has been widely applied for imaging of critical gas-phase parameters in industrial processes. To acquire high-fidelity images, CST is typically implemented by line-of-sight Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy (WMS) measurements from multiple laser beams. In this work, we present a novel quasi-parallel sensing technique and electronic circuits for industrial CST. Although the acquisition and processing of these multiple beams using a fully parallel data acquisition (DAQ) and signal processing system can achieve maximised temporal response in CST, it leads to a highly complex and power-consuming instrumentation with electronics-caused inconsistency between the sampled beams, in addition to significant burden on data transfer infrastructure. To address these issues, the digitisation and demodulation of the multi-beam signals in the proposed quasi-parallel sensing technique are multiplexed over the high-frequency modulation within a wavelength scan. Our development not only maintains the temporal response of the fully parallel sensing scheme, but also facilitates cost-effective implementation of industrial CST with very low complexity and reduced load on data transfer. The proposed technique was analytically proofed and then numerically examined by noise-contaminated CST simulations. Finally, the designed electronics was experimentally validated using a lab-scale CST system with 32 laser beams.
Marta Beltrán
added a research item
Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) tomography has been widely used for in situ combustion diagnostics, yielding images of both species concentration and temperature. The temperature image is generally obtained from the reconstructed absorbance distributions for two spectral transitions, i.e. two-line thermometry. However, the inherently ill-posed nature of tomographic data inversion leads to noise in each of the reconstructed absorbance distributions. These noise effects propagate into the absorbance ratio and generate artefacts in the retrieved temperature image. To address this problem, we have developed a novel algorithm, which we call Relative Entropy Tomographic RecOnstruction (RETRO), for TDLAS tomography. A relative entropy regularisation is introduced for high-fidelity temperature image retrieval from jointly reconstructed two-line absorbance distributions. We have carried out numerical simulations and proof-of-concept experiments to validate the proposed algorithm. Compared with the well-established Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (SART), the RETRO algorithm significantly improves the quality of the tomographic temperature images, exhibiting excellent robustness against TDLAS tomographic measurement noise. RETRO offers great potential for industrial field applications of TDLAS tomography, where it is common for measurements to be performed in very harsh environments.
Marta Beltrán
added a research item
Quantification of aero-engine emission is typically carried out using etfractive sampling resulting in poor spatio-temporal resolution. Here we present recent images obtained using non-intrusive chemical species tomography on a large-scale commercial aero-engine.
Marta Beltrán
added a project goal
The CIDAR project is the result of a Consortium formed by Academic Parties (Manchester, Strathclyde and Edinburgh Universities), a Research and Development Organization (INTA) and private companies (DAS Photonics and OptoSci). Therefore, CIDAR builds upon the expertise of the UK's and Spain’s world-leading groups in fibre-lasers, laser based gas and particulate detection, opto-electronics, and chemical species tomography (CST), allied to its industrial strengths in aero-engine manufacture and aviation fuel technology.
The CIDAR project aims to establish a world-leading capability in the non-intrusive measurement and 2D imaging of nvPM/soot and CO2 concentrations in aero-engine exhaust. Non-intrusive planar tomographic measurement of CO2 will be based on calibration-free Fibre-Laser Absorption Spectroscopy and soot measurements will be based on laser-induced incandescence (LII).
Validation of both imaging technologies will be carried out at the INTA Turbojet Test Centre using large civil turbofan engines, providing data analysis and measurement uncertainty of the current state of the art measurement systems.
The measurement system will then be developed to a maturity level of TRL6 with a clearly identified route to commercialisation.
This project has received funding from the Clean Sky 2 Joint Undertaking under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 785539.
Project website: www.cidar.eu