Project

CHILDREN’S ECOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE: DRAWINGS AS A TOOL FOR ETHNOECOLOGISTS -- Le savoir écologique des enfants : les dessins comme outils pour les ethnoécologues.

Goal: Children have long been marginalized in ethnoecological research on traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) and representations of nature. Few tools or resources exist to address the children'ʹs world in ethnoecology. Nonetheless, many questions and themes,
especially around the production and transmission of TEK, concern children. Children build their own traditions and skills, which shape both their own cultural productions and those of adults. Children’s TEK consequently should be considered alongside that of adults in ethnoecological research. Children are both producers and repositories of ecological knowledge and societal values. They mobilize these in an autonomous manner to interact with their environment in order to improve their living conditions, conduct experiments, and adjust to a changing world. This project aims to reconsider children’s TEK, analyse and discuss the practical and heuristic interest of a new tool in ethnoecology: children’s drawings.

Updates
0 new
0
Recommendations
0 new
0
Followers
0 new
9
Reads
0 new
73

Project log

Stéphanie M. Carrière
added a research item
Understanding local knowledge about wild edible plants (WEP) is essential for assessing plant services, reducing the risks of knowledge extinction, recognizing the rights of local communities, and improving biodiversity conservation efforts. However, the knowledge of specific groups such as women or children tends to be under-represented in local ecological knowledge (LEK) research. In this study, we explore how knowledge of WEP is distributed across gender and life stages (adults/children) among Betsileo people in the southern highlands of Madagascar. Using data from free listings with 42 adults and 40 children, gender-balanced, we show that knowledge on WEP differs widely across gender and life stage. In addition, we find that children have extended knowledge of WEP while reporting different species than adults. Women's knowledge specializes in herbaceous species (versus other plant life forms), while men's knowledge specializes in endemic species (versus native or introduced). Finally, we find that introduced species are more frequently cited by children, while adults cite more endemic species. We discuss the LEK differentiation mechanisms and the implications of acquiring life stage's knowledge in the highland landscapes of Mada-gascar. Given our findings, we highlight the importance of considering groups with under-represented knowledge repositories, such as children and women, into future research.
Vincent Porcher
added a research item
Understanding local knowledge about wild edible plants (WEP) is essential for assessing plant services, reducing the risks of knowledge extinction, recognizing the rights of local communities, and improving biodiversity conservation efforts. However, the knowledge of specific groups such as women or children tends to be under-represented in local ecological knowledge research (LEK). In this study, we explore how knowledge of WEP is distributed across gender and life stages (adults/children) among Betsileo people in the southern highlands of Madagascar. Using data from free listings with 42 adults and 40 children, gender-balanced, we show that knowledge on WEP differs widely across gender and life stage. In addition, we found that children have extended knowledge of WEP while reporting species different from adults’ one. We show that women's knowledge is specialized in herbaceous species (versus other plant life forms) while men's knowledge is specialized in endemic species (versus native or introduced). Finally, we found that introduced species were more frequently cited by children, while adults tended to cite more endemic species. Further, we discuss the LEK differentiation mechanisms and the implications of acquiring life stage’s knowledge in the highland landscapes of Madagascar. Given our findings, we encourage considering under-represented knowledge repositories groups such as children and females into future studies and policy-making.
Stéphanie M. Carrière
added 2 research items
The local perception of climate change and the process that leads IPLCs to their adaptation strategy is still unknown. However, this is crucial to grasp local responses, stakes and predict future trends. To fill this gap, we worked with Betsileo peoples (Madagascar), a group of farmers deeply impacted by seasonal shifts. We adopted a holistic approach exploring widely the concept of changes and the multiple aspects involved in Betsileo’s understanding of climate change their adaptation strategies. Our results show that for Betsileo, climate change is not only the result of a bioclimatic process but is also the consequence of people’s failure to comply with traditional rules and taboos. Consequently, to cope with climate change, Betsileos adopted a mixed adaptation strategy relying on technical and magico-religious responses. Such complex biocultural mesh must be studied with holistic and multidisciplinary approach in order to fully understand the dynamics of local responses to climate change.
Current climate change is responsible for the greatest food scarcity ever known in the extreme south of Madagascar. Knowledge of wild edible plants has never been so crucial in this area to limit the food risk. Consequently, there is an urgent need to document this knowledge. However, the knowledge of specific groups such as women or children tends to be under-represented in local ecological knowledge research (LEK). Here, for the first time, we use a mixed-method embedding phylogeny and network approach to examine the wild edible plant knowledge distribution among Mahafaly people and use a Cultural Consensus Model to assess knowledge variation between children and adults. Our findings suggest that knowledge on wild edible plants differ mostly between children and adults than between gender. However, we didn’t find cultural differences between children and adults in terms of know-how using the cultural consensus model probably due to method limitations with children. We discuss the patterned distribution of knowledge as an adaptation strategy and the existence of specific ecological knowledge held by Mahafaly children and their role in extreme scarcity situations.
Stéphanie M. Carrière
added a research item
Children are often marginalized in research on local perceptions and values of the environment, and even more of marine spaces and species. Yet, as users and future managers of fisheries, they are directly concerned by issues related to their sustainability. Moreover, they not only receive, but also contribute to produce, hybridize, and circulate fisheries-related knowledge. As shown in several recent research projects and the growing scientific literature on the matter, drawings allow children to express their relationships with their environment in a playful and age-appropriate way, and are therefore a particularly relevant tool for exploring children's ecological knowledge. As part of the research project A Sea of Connections: Contextualizing Fisheries in the South Pacific Region (SOCPacific, 2018-2022), we have designed a transdisciplinary protocol based on drawings made by children in order to provide innovative insights into the social values of fisheries-related places and resources. Forêt « primaire » Terres cultivées Brief description of SOCPacific: Brief description of the research protocol:
Elodie Fache
added a research item
Children are often marginalized in research on local perceptions and values of the environment, and even more of marine spaces and species. Yet, as users and future managers of fisheries, they are directly concerned by issues related to their sustainability. Moreover, they not only receive, but also contribute to produce, hybridize, and circulate fisheries-related knowledge. As shown in several recent research projects and the growing scientific literature on the matter, drawings allow children to express their relationships with their environment in a playful and age-appropriate way, and are therefore a particularly relevant tool for exploring children's ecological knowledge. As part of the research project 'A Sea of Connections: Contextualizing Fisheries in the South Pacific Region' (SOCPacific, 2018-2022), we have designed a transdisciplinary protocol based on drawings made by children in order to provide innovative insights into the social values of fisheries-related places and resources.
Stéphanie M. Carrière
added 12 research items
Le savoir écologique des enfants : les dessins comme outils pour les ethnoécologues (Gabon, Madagascar). Les enfants ont longtemps été marginalisés dans les recherches en ethnoécologie portant sur le savoir écologique traditionnel (TEK) et les représentations de la nature. Il existe peu d'outils et de ressources pour analyser le monde des enfants en ethnoécologie. Cependant, de nombreuses questions et de nombreux thèmes, particulièrement au sujet de la production et de la transmission du TEK, concernent les enfants. Ces derniers construisent leurs propres traditions et compétences, lesquelles façonnent leurs propres productions culturelles, ainsi que celles des adultes. Le TEK des enfants devrait donc être analysé au même titre que celui des adultes dans la recherche en ethnoécologie. Les enfants sont à la fois producteurs et dépositaires du savoir écologique et des valeurs sociétales. Ils mobilisent ces dernières de manière autonome pour interagir avec leur environnement afin d'améliorer leurs conditions de vie, de mener leurs propres expériences, et de s'adapter à un monde qui change. Cet article, principalement fondé sur un terrain effectué au Gabon et à Madagascar, vise à revisiter le TEK des enfants, à analyser et à discuter l'intérêt pratique et heuristique d'un nouvel outil en ethnoécologie : les dessins d'enfants. Abstract-Children have long been marginalized in ethnoecological research on traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) and representations of nature. Few tools or resources exist to address the children'ʹs world in ethnoecology. Nonetheless, many questions and themes, especially around the production and transmission of TEK, concern children. Children build their own traditions and skills, which shape both their own cultural productions and those of adults. Children's TEK consequently should be considered alongside that of adults in ethnoecological research. Children are both producers and repositories of ecological knowledge and societal values. They mobilize these in an autonomous manner to interact with their environment in order to improve their living conditions, conduct experiments, and adjust to a changing world. Based mainly on fieldwork conducted in Gabon and Madagascar, this paper aims to reconsider children's TEK, analyse and discuss the practical and heuristic interest of a new tool in ethnoecology: children's drawings. Resumen-El conocimiento ecológico de los niños: los dibujos como herramientas para los etnoecólogos (Gabón, Madagascar). Los niños siempre han sido marginados en las investigaciones etnoecológicas del conocimiento ecológico tradicional (TEK) y de las representaciones de la naturaleza. Sin embargo, existen pocas herramientas y pocos recursos existen para indagar el mundo de los niños en etnoecología. Por lo tanto, numerosas ANTHROPOCHILDREN 7, 2017, URL: https://popups.uliege.be:443/2034-­-8517/index.php?id=2777 Stéphanie Carrière & al: Children's ecological knowledge 2 cuestiones y numerosos temas, en particular acerca de la producción y de la transmisión de los TEK, se refieren a los niños. Los niños construyen sus propias tradiciones y sus propias habilidades que dan cuerpo no solo a sus propias producciones culturales sino a las de los adultos. El TEK de los niños se debería analizar como aquel de los adultos en la investigación ethnoecológica. Los niños son productores y depositarios del saber ecológico y de las valores societales. Éstas están movilizados de manera autónoma, para interactuar con su medio ambiente, con el fin de mejorar sus condiciones de vida, de experimentar y de adaptarse a un mundo cambiante. Este artículo, que se basa principalmente en un trabajo de campo en Gabón y Madagascar, tiene como objetivo de re-­-considerar el TEK de los niños y de analizar y discutir la relevancia práctica y heurística de esa nueva herramienta en etnoecología: los dibujos de los niños.
Stéphanie M. Carrière
added a research item
Le développement de nouvelles technologies numériques permettent aux enseignants d’innover en matière de transfert des connaissances. La création artistique, mêlant art et science, processus créatif et apport de connaissances, constitue une approche efficace en éducation scientifique et sensibilisation à l’environnement. Dans le cadre du projet ARBOPOLIS jeunesse, visant à sensibiliser les enfants à l’importance de la conservation et gestion durable des arbres fruitiers pour assurer la sécurité alimentaire d’une population mondiale croissante, des chercheurs, enseignants et élèves ont collaboré pour réaliser des films d’animation. Quatre écoles primaires, 2 en France et 2 au Cameroun ont participé au projet et ont élaboré chacun un film sur un arbre fruitier local, le safoutier au Cameroun et le figuier en France. La technique artistique utilisée a été le stop motion, technique d’animation basée sur la prise de photographies avec déplacement d’objets entre chaque prise puis défilement rapide donnant l’illusion du mouvement. Les scénarios, dialogues, décors, personnages ont été écrits, dessinés et narrés par les élèves à partir des connaissances apportées par les interventions de chercheurs et étudiants. Cette technique artistique permet d’identifier chaque action du film, en proposant une logique narrative qui soit le reflet des connaissances scientifiques. Afin d’évaluer son apport éducatif en science, nous avons utilisé un outil issu de l’ethnoécologie capable de capter les représentations des enfants : le dessin. Ainsi, les enfants ont effectué deux dessins, l’un avant et l’autre après le cycle d’intervention. La comparaison quantitative et qualitative de leurs contenus a permis d’évaluer l’efficacité de cette pratique.
Stéphanie M. Carrière
added a research item
Les enfants sont souvent marginalisés dans les recherches en sciences sociales et en ethnoécologie portant sur les représentations, valeurs, connaissances et pratiques liées à l’environnement. Pourtant, ils sont particulièrement concernés par la production et la transmission des savoirs écologiques et sont les futurs usagers et gestionnaires des ressources naturelles. Faire dessiner les enfants constitue un outil particulièrement pertinent pour explorer les manières dont ils pensent et expriment leur rapport à l’environnement. Le poster présente cet outil de façon générale, puis son application en cours dans le cadre du projet de recherche interdisciplinaire SOCPacific (https://socpacific.net/). Ce projet s’intéresse aux dimensions sociales, politiques et géopolitiques des pêcheries côtières et hauturières et de leur gestion dans le Pacifique Sud, avec une attention particulière pour trois zones d’étude : la Nouvelle-Calédonie, le Vanuatu et les îles Fidji. L’équipe va mobiliser le dessin d’enfants pour apporter un éclairage innovant sur les représentations et valeurs associées à la mer et à ses ressources dans le Pacifique Sud. Cela permettra d’analyser les (dé)connexions établies par les enfants entre les pratiques de pêche et les contextes sociaux et environnementaux dans lesquels elles s'inscrivent. Une mise en perspective entre contextes urbains et ruraux ; entre Nouvelle-Calédonie, Vanuatu et Fidji ; éventuellement entre le Pacifique et d’autres régions du monde sera envisagée. L’équipe envisage également d’utiliser ces dessins d’enfants pour faire dialoguer les chercheurs avec les différents acteurs de la pêche et de sa gestion.
Vincent Porcher
added a research item
Alors que les enfants représentent plus de 40% des populations vivant sous les tropiques, ils sont les laissés pour compte de la recherche, notamment en ethnoécologie. Pour appréhender le monde, il est essentiel de tenir compte du rôle et de la place des enfants dans les interactions société-nature. En effet, ceux-ci détiennent des connaissances et savoir-faire qui leur sont spécifiques, formant ce que l'on peut nommer une " culture enfantine ". Travailler sur les savoirs et pratiques des enfants se confrontè a un principal défi : l'approche méthodologique. Les méthodes, telles les enquêtes, conçues pour travailler avec des adultes, ne sont souvent pas adaptées aux enfants. Les approches artistiques impliquant corps, créativité, émotions présentent des avantages majeurs pour travailler avec les enfants. Parmi elles, le dessin permet aux enfants de donner à voir leur vision du monde sans avoir à la verbaliser. Cette méthode, empruntée a la pédopsychologie, permet de recueillir des aspects de leur relation à l'environnement qui va au-delà du seul contexte cognitif. Nous proposons ici de présenter cette approche-de la collectè a l'analyse des données conduite à Madagascar. Faisant face à de nombreux défis écologiques et sociaux, nous présenterons comment le dessin permet de comprendre les représentations et usages de la nature des enfants de différentes populations malgaches. Nous présenterons les limites de cette méthode et nous interrogeons également le positionnement du chercheur qui grâce à cette approche peut se faire le passeur d'un savoir entre les sciences et la société, et entre disciplines.
Stéphanie M. Carrière
added a project goal
Children have long been marginalized in ethnoecological research on traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) and representations of nature. Few tools or resources exist to address the children'ʹs world in ethnoecology. Nonetheless, many questions and themes,
especially around the production and transmission of TEK, concern children. Children build their own traditions and skills, which shape both their own cultural productions and those of adults. Children’s TEK consequently should be considered alongside that of adults in ethnoecological research. Children are both producers and repositories of ecological knowledge and societal values. They mobilize these in an autonomous manner to interact with their environment in order to improve their living conditions, conduct experiments, and adjust to a changing world. This project aims to reconsider children’s TEK, analyse and discuss the practical and heuristic interest of a new tool in ethnoecology: children’s drawings.