Project

CA18138 - Research Innovation and Sustainable Pan-European Network in Peripartum Depression Disorder (RiseupPPD)

Goal: The main goal of Riseup-PPD COST Action is to establish a Pan-European multidisciplinary network of researchers dedicated to the understanding of Peripartum Depression Disorder (PPD), from its prevention and assessment to its treatment and global impact.

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Roser Palau-Costafreda
added a project reference
Eleni Vousoura
added a research item
Background: Mental disorders during the perinatal period are a significant health concern, especially during a pandemic, in which healthcare provision is highly demanding, and governmental measures to prevent infection influence the population’s daily living. This study aimed to analyse the role of governmental responses to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, measured by the Containment and Health Index (CHI), on symptoms of anxiety and depression during pregnancy and postpartum, while considering the countries’ Inequality-adjusted Human Development Index (IHDI) and individual factors such as age, gravidity, and exposure to COVID-19. Methods: This study analysed women who completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) or the Generalised Anxiety Disorder Assessment (GAD-7) during pregnancy or the postpartum period (n = 7,645) from 12 countries of the Research Innovation and Sustainable Pan-European Network in Peripartum Depression Disorder, task force COVID-19 (Riseup-PPD-COVID-19) observational prospective study. Findings: The overall prevalence of clinically significant depression symptoms (EPDS ≥ 13) was 30%, ranging from 20·5% in Cyprus to 44·3% in Brazil. The prevalence of clinically significant anxiety symptoms (GAD-7 ≥ ten) was 23·6% (ranging from 14·2% in Israel and Turkey to 39·5% in Brazil). Higher symptoms of anxiety or depression were observed in multigravida exposed to COVID-19 or living in countries with a higher number of deaths due to COVID-19. Furthermore, multigravida from countries with lower IHDI or CHI had higher symptoms of anxiety and depression. Interpretation: Perinatal mental health is context-dependent. Women from more disadvantaged countries are at higher risk for poor mental health. The implementation of more restrictive measures seem to be a protective factor for mental health.
Ana Ganho-Ávila
added a research item
Background Non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) techniques have been suggested as alternative treatments to decrease depression symptoms during the perinatal period. These include brain stimulation techniques that do not require surgery and that are nonpharmacological and non-psychotherapeutic. NIBS that have showed antidepressant effect so far include repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), transcranial electric stimulation (TES) and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Objectives This systematic review aims to summarize evidence on NIBS efficacy, safety and acceptability in treating peripartum depression (PPD). Methods We included randomized, non-randomized and case reports, that used NIBS during pregnancy and the postpartum. The reduction of depressive symptoms was the primary outcome and neonatal safety was the co-primary outcome. Results: rTMS shows promising results for the treatment of PPD, with clinically significant decreases in depressive symptoms between baseline and end of treatment and overall good acceptability. Although the safety profile for rTMS is adequate in the postpartum, caution is warranted during pregnancy. In TES, evidence on efficacy derives mostly from single-arm studies, compromising the encouraging findings. Further investigation is necessary concerning ECT, as clinical practice relies on clinical experience and is only described in low-quality case-reports. Limitations The reduced number of controlled studies, the lack of complete datasets and the serious/high risk of bias of the reports warrants cautious interpretations. Conclusions and implications Existing evidence is limited across NIBS techniques; comparative studies are lacking, and standard stimulation parameters are yet to be established. Although rTMS benefits from the most robust research, future multicenter randomized clinical trials are needed to determine the position of each NIBS strategy within the pathways of care.
Eleni Vousoura
added 2 research items
Background Corona Virus Disease 19 (COVID-19) is a new pandemic, declared a public health emergency by the World Health Organization, which could have negative consequences for pregnant and postpartum women. The scarce evidence published to date suggests that perinatal mental health has deteriorated since the COVID-19 outbreak. However, the few studies published so far have some limitations, such as a cross-sectional design and the omission of important factors for the understanding of perinatal mental health, including governmental restriction measures and healthcare practices implemented at the maternity hospitals. Within the Riseup-PPD COST Action, a study is underway to assess the impact of COVID-19 in perinatal mental health. The primary objectives are to (1) evaluate changes in perinatal mental health outcomes; and (2) determine the risk and protective factors for perinatal mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, we will compare the results between the countries participating in the study. Methods This is an international prospective cohort study, with a baseline and three follow-up assessments over a six-month period. It is being carried out in 11 European countries (Albania, Bulgaria, Cyprus, France, Greece, Israel, Malta, Portugal, Spain, Turkey, and the United Kingdom), Argentina, Brazil and Chile. The sample consists of adult pregnant and postpartum women (with infants up to 6 months of age). The assessment includes measures on COVID-19 epidemiology and public health measures (Oxford COVID-19 Government Response Tracker dataset), Coronavirus Perinatal Experiences (COPE questionnaires), psychological distress (BSI-18), depression (EPDS), anxiety (GAD-7) and post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSD checklist for DSM-V). Discussion This study will provide important information for understanding the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on perinatal mental health and well-being, including the identification of potential risk and protective factors by implementing predictive models using machine learning techniques. The findings will help policymakers develop suitable guidelines and prevention strategies for perinatal mental health and contribute to designing tailored mental health interventions. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04595123.
Background: Perinatal depression is a high prevalent mental health problem with serious consequences. Evidence about effective psychological interventions in treating perinatal depression has been increasing, but it lacks a comprehensive synthesis of findings. Methods: A systematic review of systematic reviews and meta-analyses concerning the effectiveness of psychological interventions in treating perinatal depression (depression during pregnancy and the first 12 months postpartum) in adult women was conducted. The electronic databases MEDLINE (PubMed), PsycINFO, The Cochrane Library, Web of Science and Prospero were searched, on May 2020, using a combination of keywords. Data were independently extracted by two authors and a synthesis of the results was presented. Methodological quality was independently assessed by two authors, using AMSTAR-2. Results: Seven systematic reviews were included and reported, overall, the effectiveness of psychological interventions in decreasing depressive symptoms in women in the perinatal period, both short and long-term. CBT was found to be the most effective intervention, regardless of the treatment format. Limitations: Grey literature was not searched, and some studies may overlap among the included systematic reviews. These (the included reviews) were rated with low methodological quality, which weakens the evidence of the reported results. Conclusions: CBT is currently the most evidence-based psychological intervention, provided in different delivery formats (individual, group, face-to-face or Internet-based). Further studies, including systematic reviews, with other types of psychological interventions (e.g., third-wave CBT) and with higher quality are needed.
Eleni Vousoura
added a research item
Background : Peripartum depression [PPD] is a public health problem which has been widely studied. Nonetheless, study findings and clinical guidelines for PPD treatment differ among countries and the condition is still underdiagnosed and undertreated, suggesting the importance of a global understanding of PPD. The Riseup-PPD Cost Action aims to establish a Pan-European and multidisciplinary network of researchers dedicated to the global understanding of PPD. Methods : A literature search was performed in different databases (e.g., Medline, PsychInfo) including a combination of terms related with PPD diagnosis, prevention, treatment and cost-effectiveness of its management. A narrative synthesis of the literature, together with a critical overview of the current issues/questions to be addressed within the topic of PPD were performed. Results : Emerging issues include challenges regarding definition and timing of PPD; heterogeneity in severity, timing of onset and assessment tools; comparative effectiveness of preventive and treatment interventions; help seeking for PPD; improving health professional's awareness of PPD; and cost-effectiveness of PPD management. Limitations: The main limitation is the non-systematic nature of the literature search. Conclusions : The Riseup-PPD network will deal with these challenges through four lines of action: (1)provide an updated and comprehensive synthesis of existing knowledge that can contribute to inform clinical recommendations and guidelines for PPD management; (2) clarify inconsistent findings concerning diagnosis, prevention and treatment of PPD; (3) develop new lines of research in the field of PPD; and (4) develop international recommendations for PPD diagnosis, prevention and treatment, ultimately influencing maternal mental health policymaking at global and local levels.
Gülcan Tecirli
added a project goal
The main goal of Riseup-PPD COST Action is to establish a Pan-European multidisciplinary network of researchers dedicated to the understanding of Peripartum Depression Disorder (PPD), from its prevention and assessment to its treatment and global impact.