Project

'British Mensa's: ANDROGYNY'

Goal: -To publish a quarterly edition of 'British Mensa's: Androgyny'.

-To collect a body of work from across many different disciplines on the topic of Androgyny.

-To have a range of article types to suit a range of audiences, including the British Mensa Androgyny Special Interest Group.


British Mensa’s: ANDROGYNY publishes three sections per issue:

• Editorial & Letters (Joint or Guest Editorials will be considered upon enquiry; Letters welcomed throughout year, but should be <500 words).

• Articles (Empirical Research; Structured Literature Reviews; Theoretical Debates & Position Papers – all should be 1,500-2,500 words. Shorter Essays & Technical Reports should be 1,000-1,200 words. Articles exceeding these limits will be considered on an individual basis. Welcomed throughout year.)

• The S.A.N.D.R.A. Section (“Special Androgyny News, Dates, Reviews, & Arts” (not necessarily in that order!) – this will be a round-up of recent news & upcoming events, plus media reviews e.g. book/journal/event/theatre/film etc., and interviews & monographs (both usually with interviewee’s/author’s picture), poetry, art, & creative writing; limited to 800 words).

Methods: Anthropology, Women and Politics Research, Psychology, Clinical Psychology, Health Psychology, Sociology, Social Anthropology, Gender Studies, Gender Identity, Gender Differences, Gender Equality, Women's Studies, Gender Relations, Women's History, Gender Discrimination, Gender Analysis, Sexuality, Sex Characteristics, Human Body, Gender Dysphoria, Women Empowerment, Gender History, Sociology of Sexuality, Women's Health, Sex Differences, Evolutionary Anthropology, Women's Reproductive Health, Working Women, Sex Differentiation, Men's Health, Body Image, Women's Rights, Gender Role

Date: 1 December 2016

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Project log

Sergio A. Silverio
added 3 research items
The start of 2018 saw the disgraced former United States medical doctor and convicted sexual predator Larry Nassar sentenced to between 40 and 175 years of state imprisonment by Ingham County Circuit Court Judge Rosemarie Aquilina. Nassar trained in kinesiology, before working as an athletic trainer for the national gymnastics team of the United States of America. He then graduated as in osteopathic medicine and completed his medical training in the late 1990s in both family practice and sports medicine. Nassar continued working with, and abusing, national and Olympic athletes throughout his career before USA Gymnastics began investigating allegations brought forward against him by athletes in 2015. Soon after he was facing investigation and charges of an incalculable number of accounts of sexual misconduct, molestation, sexual abuse, paedophilia, and child pornography.
We live in an inherently gendered world. And whether people like it or not, the binaries of male and female-man and woman-masculine and feminine, have long lost their utility, and quite frankly, also their meaning. The issue, of course, is that the dominant societal discourses take longer to dismantle than scientific evidence comes to light, and much longer than the reality of one's lived experience is evident of 'difference' from the so-called societal norms.
This is the FULL ISSUE of British Mensa's ANDROGYNY - Volume 3 - Issue 3 - October 2019 with contributions from various authors. The issue is being archived by myself as the Editor of this journal. Please see guidance notes, disclaimer and copyright information within, for the subsequent distribution of material contained within this journal.
Sergio A. Silverio
added 2 research items
Health and ill health are difficult to speak about at the best of times. When gender, sex, and sexuality is considered, this difficulty is only amplified. In addressing this, the human sciences have often prevailed where the health sciences have lagged behind – adopting a critical perspective to both health and illness. Scholars from Feminist Psychology and Sociology, those from Community, Disability, and Fat Studies, and the emerging branches of critical health activists have been spurred to do more because of their underlying commitment to not only social justice, but to interdisciplinarity with which they attempt to tackle the issues at large from all possible perspectives. I believe this issue is a shining example of what we can do when we cross the disciplinary divides and begin to think together.
Sergio A. Silverio
added 4 research items
The existential branch of philosophy is, by origin, a male dominated. However, one would be foolish to underestimate the extent to which women helped shape the philosophy now synonymous with selfish authenticity; independence and freedom; and the languishing associated with finding the true meaning of life, as we are born into nothing with only one certainty, that death awaits us. In Psychology, must incorporate wider areas of research to fully understand and explain these relationships between genders. In this critical review,
One of the most influential figureheads in the history of feminism is undoubtedly Simone de Beauvoir. It is she who is credited with fuelling postwar debate on feminism, ethics, and existentialism. We look back to this period as a notable point of social change for women's rights, sexual liberation, and gendered equality beyond that of suffrage. It can, however, sometimes be seen when authors use de Beauvoir's arguments, they detach her from her existentialist roots, and see her solely as a feminist figurehead. Whilst the former does not preclude de Beauvoir from being idolised as the latter, existentialism-a philosophical ideology especially dominated by male characters-formed the very pillars of her thought on which she constructed her feminist manifesto. Therefore, existentialism should be considered and assessed, or at the very least acknowledged when de Beauvoir's Philosophy of Women is re-engaged and re-read in modern feminist exchanges. "A man attaches himself to woman-not to enjoy her, but to enjoy himself." ~Simone de Beauvoir (1908-1986)
Gender, sex, and sexuality are deeply entrenched in Philosophy, but as time has progressed, our understandings and attitudes towards these concepts have inevitable changed and continue to do so. The thought process behind having an issue dedicated to the Philosophy of Gender was derived from the growing concern shared amongst myself, my colleagues, and members of the ANDROGYNY Editorial Board, that we often find ourselves hurtling toward to the future of theoretical thought and research, without adequately interrogating the past. In compiling this issue, it has been interesting to see what has been written about and has been a reflexive exercise. I would implore all readers of this issue to engage in the same critical reflection seen in these articles.
Sergio A. Silverio
added an update
Due to changes in the Editorial Advisory Board and within the Publishers, we have changed the publication schedule of ANDROGYNY to a January, April, July, October model. Please note the deadline for each issue is now two months before the date of publication which will allow more time for our peer review process and to ensure each issue is published and printed in a timely manner.
Therefore, going forward, the annual publication schedule is as follows:
Issue 1: 15th January (Deadline 15th November)
Issue 2: 15th April (Deadline 15th February)
Issue 3: 15th July (Deadline 15th May)
Issue 4: 15th October (Deadline 15th August)
There is currently a ***LAST CALL*** out for our next issue:
April 2019 - The Philosophy of Gender
FINAL DEADLINE: ***15TH FEBRUARY 2019***
Subsequent issues have the following Calls for Papers:
2019
July - Gendered Health
October - Gender, Sport, and the Media
2020
January - Ageing
April - Sex & Sexual Health
July - Pregnancy and Maternity Care
October - Childhood to Parenthood
2021
January - Role Playing
April - Open Call
July - 5 Year Anniversary Edition
October - Open Call
Article Types:
  • Editorial & Letters (500 words).
  • Empirical Research; Structured Literature Reviews; Theoretical Debates & Position Papers (1,500-2,500 words).
  • Shorter Essays & Technical Reports (1,000-1,200 words).
  • Media reviews e.g. book/journal/event/theatre/film etc., interviews & monographs, poetry, art, & creative writing (800 words).
 
Sergio A. Silverio
added 3 research items
Whilst I always welcome the opportunity to debate aspects of my work, and current opinion of changing trends in gender identity and psychological health, I was surprised, and furthermore, somewhat disappointed to find such a misinformed and prejudiced response had be published in retort to my article in the publication British Mensa's: COGNITO. In my article, I reviewed the place of psychological androgyny almost half a century after its initial 1974 publication by Sandra Lipsitz Bem (see Silverio, 2018). Below is the part of Bazeley's (2018) response which pertains to my original article. It was only correct therefore, that I chose to reply to the Bazeley (2018) letter to highlight their inaccuracies and call for Bazeley and fellow readers to reflect on what is an appropriate manner and level of decorum with which to conduct oneself when discussing matters of psychological health and wellbeing. It should be noted that the Editor of British Mensa's: COGNITO, read this reply, but would not publish it in the subsequent issue, though issued an editorial note (Griffiths, 2018) in lieu of the response which follows.
With each Editorial I have written for this journal, I am increasingly heartened that we have become more than just a publication. We are moving beyond simply words on a page, beyond contributions which are simply written to be read. We are evolving and have become something of a movement-generating new ideas and ways of thinking, stimulating conversation, and truely bringing topics of gender, sex, and sexuality to the forefront of societal discourse amongst a wider collective than that engaged with the journal itself. Thoughts, positions, debates and research presented here is reaching the outside world and we should be immensely proud of this.
This is the FULL ISSUE of British Mensa's ANDROGYNY - Volume 2 - Issue 3 - September 2018 with contributions from various authors. The issue is being archived by myself as the Editor of this journal. Please see guidance notes, disclaimer and copyright information within, for the subsequent distribution of material contained within this journal.
Sergio A. Silverio
added 3 research items
MATRIARCHAL figures have always been a dominant feature of my lifecourse. Strongly opinionated, sharply tongued, steadfast Apennine and Iberian women have overseen the migrations of both matrilineal and patrilineal bloodlines across countries, and from peasantry to where I find myself today as an educated researcher of Psychological Science. In my experience, women have always ruled with an iron fist – albeit one which was always gloved in the finest velvet.
It is with equal feelings of delight and relief I write this first-year anniversary Editorial for ANDROGYNY. It seems the journal has changed quite significantly even in just the four issues which have been published to date, but I feel we are striving ever harder to meet the aims of this publication. The adaptations which have been made to the format, to the types of content, and now the way in which I run the logistics of ANDROGYNY, I feel only strengthen and further cement its presence in the empirical, theoretical, and practising professional fields in which it is read. This latest logistical change has seen almost twenty peer reviewers join the Editorial Advisory Board ranging in background, profession, and expertise. I was overwhelmed by the number of responses I received to the call for reviewers, but it speaks volumes about the quality of material our contributors have submitted. It is therefore only right that I take the time at the beginning of this Editorial to both thank and welcome the team on board.
This is the FULL ISSUE of British Mensa's ANDROGYNY - Volume 2 - Issue 2 - June 2018 with contributions from various authors. The issue is being archived by myself as the Editor of this journal. Please see guidance notes, disclaimer and copyright information within, for the subsequent distribution of material contained within this journal. This issue marks the 1 year anniversary of the publication of this Journal.
Sergio A. Silverio
added 2 research items
Taking a critical approach to any area of research interest, theoretical debate, or teaching can be a daunting endeavour. One must be prepared for critique which is often beyond that received by mainstream thought, and regularly the differences between opposing positions or opinions is so slight it can frequently be said that the argument is simply being tabled in two different ways or perspectives, but with the same conclusions being drawn and with the same end-result meaning. Constantly proposing and defending our standpoints can be exhausting, as can learning new perspectives and adapting one’s own, but in this Editorial, I shall expand how we can continue to critically discuss Androgyny, in a positive & meaningful way.
This is the FULL ISSUE of British Mensa's ANDROGYNY - Volume 2 - Issue 1 - March 2018 with contributions from various authors. The issue is being archived by myself as the Editor of this journal. Please see guidance notes, disclaimer and copyright information within, for the subsequent distribution of material contained within this journal.
Sergio A. Silverio
added a research item
Invitation to speak at a Research Work in Progress [WiP] Talk of the Faculty of Health and Social Care, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, United Kingdom.
Sergio A. Silverio
added a research item
Given carte blanche to overhaul 'British Mensa's: ANDROGYNY', I wanted to produce a 'journal x magazine' hybrid which provided a safe-space in which contributors could discuss current affairs and topical issues on Androgyny, and on gender differences, identity & society, and discussions of equality & equity.
Sergio A. Silverio
added an update
British Mensa’s: ANDROGYNY aims to provide a vibrant and engaging collection of works in a publication dedicated to intellectual debate, empirical research, and artistic expression centred on the topic of Androgyny.
This hybrid ‘journal x magazine’ offers a quarterly designated safe space to discuss current affairs and topical issues first and foremost on Androgyny, but reaches out to related contemporary areas such as gender differences, identity & society, and discussions of equalities & equity.
By collating pan-disciplinary works from contributors and distributing to an international audience, both within and outside of the subscribed members to this Special Interest Group, this ‘journal-zine’ brings together work from likeminded people to propagate teaching & learning, generate discussion, and provide a supportive community of contributors and readers who are passionate about this field.
Authors should avoid using discriminatory language (e.g. sexist; ageist; racist, heterosexist, or otherwise). References should be in APA 6th Style (2009), and be used sparingly. All contributions will be reviewed by the Editor and guidance will be offered if revisions are required. The aim is to publish works, not turn contributions away, but if in doubt about a topic area or an article you wish to submit, please contact the Editor on: S.A.Silverio@outlook.com
British Mensa’s: ANDROGYNY publishes three sections per issue:
Editorial & Letters (Joint or Guest Editorials will be considered upon enquiry; Letters welcomed throughout year, but should be <500 words).
Articles (Empirical Research; Structured Literature Reviews; Theoretical Debates & Position Papers – all should be 1,500-2,500 words. Shorter Essays & Technical Reports should be 1,000-1,200 words. Articles exceeding these limits will be considered on an individual basis. Welcomed throughout year.)
The S.A.N.D.R.A. Section (“Special Androgyny News, Dates, Reviews, & Arts” (not necessarily in that order!) – this will be a round-up of recent news & upcoming events, plus media reviews e.g. book/journal/event/theatre/film etc., and interviews & monographs (both usually with interviewee’s/author’s picture), poetry, art, & creative writing; limited to 800 words).
 
Sergio A. Silverio
added 2 research items
The third issue of British Mensa’s: ANDROGYNY, concludes a year full of legal, political, and social arguments we – as a global society – have been having about gender. 2017 has seen global trends supporting women such as the knitting and wearing of ‘Pussyhats’ in direct challenge to the American Presidency; we have witnessed the comment about Senator Elizabeth Warren: “Nevertheless She Persisted”, being used as a ‘clapback’ to patriarchal voices; and of course, we have all seen how the #MeToo Campaign began a revolution in talking about sexual abuse and sexual violence. Most importantly, each of these have given a voice, to those who were once voiceless.
This is the FULL ISSUE of British Mensa's ANDROGYNY - Volume 1 - Issue 3 - December 2017 with contributions from various authors. The issue is being archived by myself as the Editor of this journal. Please see guidance notes, disclaimer and copyright information within, for the subsequent distribution of material contained within this journal.
Sergio A. Silverio
added 3 research items
Despite the prevalent message in the United Kingdom still being one of “breast is best”; less than 1% of newly-born infants are exclusively breastfed to six months of age. Whilst the rest of the Western world similarly lacks adherence to international guidelines set by the World Health Organisation, the United Kingdom in particular seems to struggle with any level of exclusive breastfeeding. As researchers it is right to critically appraise the situation and draw conclusions as to why this may well be the case.
It brings me great delight to be releasing the second issue of British Mensa’s: ANDROGYNY, on “The Body”. It has been a challenging process, but I truely believe the quality of the articles accepted for this issue are as high as the first issue, which was warmly received by readers from all corners of the globe. My message going forward is that this journal is not just mine, but rather a collective piece. I want this publication to go forward as a collaborative effort with contributors, readers, and myself as Editor, to co-construct a space for good and vibrant discussion, with the aim to challenge some of the stereotypes and ongoing arguments surrounding: Androgyny, gender roles, and sexualities.
Sergio A. Silverio
added an update
The second issue has now been published and is available to download. I am archiving the Journal as a whole on this site in my capacity as Editor.
 
Sergio A. Silverio
added a research item
This is the FULL ISSUE of British Mensa's ANDROGYNY - Volume 1 - Issue 2 - September 2017 with contributions from various authors. The issue is being archived by myself as the Editor of this journal. Please see guidance notes, disclaimer and copyright information within, for the subsequent distribution of material contained within this journal.
Sergio A. Silverio
added an update
The first issue of 'British Mensa's: ANDROGYNY' was released today (20th June 2017) with work by a range of authors. The FULL ISSUE is available online from within this project - I hope you enjoy!
Please feel free to get in touch regarding the Journal, the content, or indeed contributing yourselves.
Regards,
Sergio A. Silverio
Editor - 'British Mensa's: ANDROGYNY'
 
Sergio A. Silverio
added 4 research items
JANUARY 2017 saw much sensation about the release of National Geographic’s Special Issue which they called the “Gender Revolution”. Like many others I was at once jubilant and stunned – the ecstasy of seeing the area I research and take much interest in finally given a share of the limelight it deserves, contrasted against the fact it had been given that very limelight on such a reputable & wide-reaching international stage.
Empirical studies are often swift to divide participants by gender, and for Psychological studies in particular, participants are simply categorised as ‘male’ or ‘female’. Statistical tests can then be run, and comparisons can be made. We must consider, however, what happens when the research takes gender not as a variable, but as the subject of the study. When gender becomes the focus of any study, we must look beyond a binary to appreciate the individualisation of gender and the autonomy over identity which people exert. It can be safely asserted, a binary ‘male-female’ model is ineffective at capturing the complexities and evermore diverse array of gender identities. ‘Androgyny’ – the contextual assumption of both traditionally ‘masculine’ and ‘feminine’ traits in society – has acted as a cornerstone for gender-fluid or multiple gender identities movements since the 1970s. But what role does ‘Androgyny’ have in society today? And does ‘Androgyny’ take the same meaning today as it did when initially conceptualised as a Psychological concept? In this article, I shall attempt to guide you into the “rabbit-hole” of modern-day Androgyny studies.
I had agreed with myself I would not take on any more projects, yet alas here I am, writing as the Editor of the newly reborn British Mensa’s: ANDROGYNY. When the letter came through asking for a new Editor, I initially ignored it – I had just secured a new job, was involved with other projects and editorial boards, but this one was just too tempting. As a Psychologist interested in the Psychology of Women, I have spent the last few years researching Femininity, and more specifically: Androgyny. The opportunity to be at the helm of this Special Interest Group is at once a great honour, incredibly exciting, and a touch frightening.
Sergio A. Silverio
added a project goal
-To publish a quarterly edition of 'British Mensa's: Androgyny'.
-To collect a body of work from across many different disciplines on the topic of Androgyny.
-To have a range of article types to suit a range of audiences, including the British Mensa Androgyny Special Interest Group.
British Mensa’s: ANDROGYNY publishes three sections per issue:
• Editorial & Letters (Joint or Guest Editorials will be considered upon enquiry; Letters welcomed throughout year, but should be <500 words).
• Articles (Empirical Research; Structured Literature Reviews; Theoretical Debates & Position Papers – all should be 1,500-2,500 words. Shorter Essays & Technical Reports should be 1,000-1,200 words. Articles exceeding these limits will be considered on an individual basis. Welcomed throughout year.)
• The S.A.N.D.R.A. Section (“Special Androgyny News, Dates, Reviews, & Arts” (not necessarily in that order!) – this will be a round-up of recent news & upcoming events, plus media reviews e.g. book/journal/event/theatre/film etc., and interviews & monographs (both usually with interviewee’s/author’s picture), poetry, art, & creative writing; limited to 800 words).
 
Sergio A. Silverio
added an update
Project goal
-To publish a quarterly edition of 'British Mensa's: Androgyny'.
-To collect a body of work from across many different disciplines on the topic of Androgyny.
-To have a range of article types to suit a range of audiences, including the British Mensa Androgyny Special Interest Group.
Background and motivation
In December 2016 I was appointed as Editor and Secretary of British Mensa's Androgyny Special Interest Group.
We have a really exciting opportunity to publish a collection of work 3 to 4 times a year on the topics of Androgyny, Gender, and Sexuality.
I envisage publishing and am currently calling for papers of the following formats:
(1) Letters and editorials;
(2) Recent and relevant news;
(3) Structured articles; theoretical debate, literature reviews & research;
(4) Book reviews and artistic & creative writing pieces (short stories, monographs, poetry etc.)
For anyone who is interested in contributing, please do not hesitate to get in touch.