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21

Project log

David Sheffield
added a research item
The study examined whether cardiovascular responses to psychological stress tests predict future anxiety and depression scores 40-months later. Hemodynamic measures were obtained from 102 healthy adults before, during and after mental arithmetic, a speech task, and a cold pressor task. The 14-item Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was administered at initial testing and at 40-months follow-up. At initial testing analyses revealed that high anxiety symptoms were characterized by blunted cardiovascular reactions to acute mental stress, particularly mental arithmetic. Furthermore, after adjustment for baseline blood pressure (BP), baseline anxiety levels and traditional risk factors, attenuated systolic BP responses to mental arithmetic were associated with future anxiety levels (ΔR² = .055). These findings suggest that blunted cardiovascular reactions to stress may be an independent risk factor for future anxiety levels.
David Sheffield
added 3 research items
This study tested the hypothesis that coronary artery disease (CAD) patients with high depressed mood scores differ in sympatho-vagal balance during mental stress compared to patients with low depressed mood scores. Using electrocardiographic monitoring, heart variability data from spectral analysis and hemodynamic parameters were obtained prior to and during mental stress from 34 men and 7 women. A public speaking task was used as the mental stressor. Patients were grouped by a median split of their Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Depression score. During mental stress, patients with higher depression scores had greater changes in peak heart rate (p < .05) and low frequency to high frequency power ratio (p < 0.05) than patients with lower scores suggesting a shift toward more sympathetic activity during mental stress. These findings may be related to the reported relation between depression and survival risk in patients with CAD.
David Sheffield
added a research item
Objective:: Anxiety and depression have been linked to blunted blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) reactions to mental stress tests; however, most studies have not included indices of underlying hemodynamics nor multiple stress tasks. This study sought to examine the relationships of anxiety and depression with hemodynamic responses to acute active and passive coping tasks. Methods:: A total of 104 participants completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales and mental arithmetic, speech, and cold pressor tasks while BP, HR, total peripheral resistance, and cardiac output (CO) were assessed. Results:: After adjustment for traditional risk factors and baseline cardiovascular activity, depression scores were negatively associated with systolic BP, HR, and CO responses to the mental arithmetic task, while anxiety scores were inversely related to the systolic BP response to mental arithmetic. Conclusion:: High anxiety or depression scores appear to be associated with blunted cardiac reactions to mental arithmetic (an active coping task), but not to the cold pressor test or speech tasks. Future research should further examine potential mechanisms and longitudinal pathways relating depression and anxiety to cardiovascular reactivity. Clinical trial registration number:: TCTR20160208004.