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Biodiversity of Carpathian Basin

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Otto Merkl
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The last checklist of the superfamily Curculionoidea of Hungary was published in 1996. Between 1996 and 2019, 68 species were added to the Hungarian fauna. This paper lists 1224 species belonging to 329 genera of 5 families from present-day Hungary. Taxonomical changes and erroneous country records in the literature are corrected. With 9 figures.
Otto Merkl
added 2 research items
A szerző a Duna-Tisza közén, Pest megyében fekvő Ócsai Gyakorlótéren (É 47,323°, K 19,318°) 2004 óta gyűjtött bogarakat. Az ottani nyílt és zárt homoki gyepek egy része kevéssé bolygatott, így bogárfaunájuk bővelkedik ritka és jellegzetesen homoki (pszammofil) fajokban. A területen gyűj-tött anyagból 287 fajt sikerült azonosítani. Egy fokozottan védett (Carabus hungaricus), 13 védett és 2 közösségi jelentőségű faj (Carabus hungaricus, Cucujus cinnaberinus) került elő. A Colon calcaratum Erichson, 1837 (Leiodidae) magyarországi előfordulását eddig csak az Ócsai Gyakor-lótéren fogott példányok bizonyítják; a fajt a magyar faunára újként a jelen írás közli. Beetles have been collected in the Ócsa military training area in the Danube–Tisza Interfluve, Pest County (É 47.323°, K 19.318°) since 2004. A part of the local open and closed grasslands is relatively undisturbed and thus the area is exceptionally rich in psammophilous species. A total of 287 beetle species was identified of which 1 is strictly protected (Carabus hungaricus), 13 are protected and 2 are species of community interest (Carabus hungaricus, Cucujus cinnaberinus). The occurrence of Colon calcaratum Erichson, 1837 (Leiodidae) has only been documented from the Ócsa military training area in Hungary and it is presented here as new for the Hungarian fauna.
A Duna-Tisza közén, Pest megyében fekvő Turjánvidék Natura 2000 terület déli részén, vagyis a Táborfalvai Lő-és Gyakorlótéren és a Dabasi Turjános Természetvédelmi Területen az 1990-es évek eleje óta gyűjtött bogáranyagból 1085 fajt határoztunk meg. A bogárfauna természetvédelmi és faunisztikai szempontból legértékesebb tagjai a nyílt és zárt homoki gyepek lakói. A területről 41 védett és 1 fokozottan védett faj került elő, köztük 4 Natura 2000 jelölőfaj, a magyar futrinka (Carabus hungaricus), a szarvas álganéjtúró (Bolbelasmus unicornis), a skarlátbogár (Cucujus cinnaberinus) és a nagy hőscincér (Cerambyx cerdo). Országos viszonylatban is kiemelkedően népes állománya él itt a következő védett fajoknak: Carabus hungaricus (Carabidae), Glaresis rufa (Glaresidae), Herpes porcellus (Curculionidae), Macrosiagon bimaculata (Ripiphoridae), Scarabaeus typhon (Scarabaeidae), Stenoria apicalis (Meloidae). A területről előkerült egy su-tabogárpéldány (Histeridae), mely a Magyarországon eddig ismeretlen Microsaprinus genuszba tartozik, de mivel nőstény, faji szinten egyelőre nem lehet azonosítani. A total of 1085 beetle species was identified from the material collected in the southern part of the Turjánvidék Natura 2000 site in Pest County, in the Danube–Tisza Interfluve, more precisely within the Táborfalva military training area and the Dabas Turjános Nature Conservation Area. The most valuable species both in terms of nature conservation and faunistics are inhabitants of open and closed sandy grassland habitats. The material yielded 41 protected and 1 strictly protected beetle species of which four are species of community interest, namely Carabus hungaricus, Bolbelasmus unicornis, Cucujus cinnaberinus and Cerambyx cerdo. The following protected species have populations significant at the national level: Carabus hungaricus (Carabidae), Glaresis rufa (Glaresidae), Herpes porcellus (Curculionidae), Macrosiagon bimaculata (Ripiphoridae), Scarabaeus typhon (Scarabaeidae), Stenoria apicalis (Meloidae). Furthermore, a specimen belonging to the genus Microsaprinus (Histeridae) has also been identified. This genus was previously unknown from Hungary, but the specimen is a female, therefore identification at the species level is impossible.
Otto Merkl
added a research item
Fourteen species of Coleoptera belonging to seven families are recorded from Hungary for the first time. With 9 figures.
Otto Merkl
added 2 research items
Native in southern and eastern Asia and the South Pacific, but introduced into other parts of the world, Cybocephalus nipponicus Endrődy-Younga, 1971 (Coleoptera: Cybocephalidae) is reported from Hungary based on specimens collected in Budapest, Hungary, representing a new country record for the species. This is likely a recent introduction, the level of establishment is unknown. With 3 figures.
Nine species of Coleoptera belonging to five families (Ciidae, Melandryidae, Nitidulidae, Ptinidae, Staphylinidae) are recorded from Hungary for the first time. Occurrences of Dacne pontica (Bedel, 1868) (Erotylidae) and Mycterus curculioides (Fabricius, 1781) (Mycteridae) in Hungary are confirmed. With 16 figures.
Otto Merkl
added 2 research items
This short contribution is devoted to protest against an ethically objectionable report. Carterus angustipennis lutshniki Zamotajlov, 1988 (Coleoptera: Carabidae) is new to Hungary. It was collected by O. Merkl in Szarvas (county Békés) but the finding was published by L. Ádám without knowledge and approval of the collector and J. Rudner, the junior author.
In 1797, ROBERT TOWNSON (1762-1827) published a book entitled „Travels in Hungary with a short account of Vienna in the year 1793” with an Appendix „Entomologia”, in which he listed a number of beetles (Coleoptera). The list comprises 353 numbered taxa (i. e. species and varieties) although the numbering ends with 396 and the sequence of the serial numbers is inconsistent. For instance, 400, 401, 403 and 405 preceedes 369, 370 etc. on page 476. Some serial numbers occur twice, while others are missing, for unknown reasons. Unfortunately, he simply listed the species captured or observed by himself during his trip and gave no precise locality data. There is indirect evidence that some species were taken in the Carpathians. For example, Pachyta quadrimaculata (Leptura 4-maculata by Townson) is extremely rare in the present-day Hungary, but is not uncommon in the conifer belt of the Carpathians. It is clear from Chapter XV that he observed this species in the High Tatra Mts which is now outside of the territory of Hungary. Townson gave descriptions of 14 new species and some of them, along with a few other species, are depicted in natural size on copper engravings. Binominal nomenclature was used in naming 10 species while in the case of the remaining four the species name was substituted with „Nov. Spec.”. Five of TOWNSON's names are found in the Junk & Schenkling Catalogue (the only complete catalogue of beetles) and these are all junior synonyms of formerly described species. However, nine names are missing in this catalogue. It is believed that some contributors of the Junk & Schenkling Catalogue were unaware of TOWNSON's book or unable to ascertain the validity of TOWNSON's names simply because his descriptions are epigrammatic (as it was usual in early entomological literature), and the drawings are very small. Investigation of the voucher specimens would help to classify the new species but, alas, the whereabouts of his collection is unknown. As for the early coleopterology in Hungary, TOWNSON's contemporaries include J. CONRAD (1782) who listed 30 beetle species (mainly scarabs) from the region of Sopron. PILLER & MITTERPACHER (1783) published a number of species but this was a result of their two-month trip to Slavonia (now part of Croatia). An unknown naturalist (Anonymus 1792) reported 74 species from county Bars (now part of Slovakia). The books of SCOPOLI (1772), OLIVIER (1789) and CREUTZER (1799) were focused on descriptions of new species from various countries and included 18, 3 and 2 species from Hungary, respectively, without closer localities. Therefore, the „Entomologia” Appendix of TOWNSON is an important piece of early entomological literature of Hungary, and along with CONRAD's (1782) paper it can be considered the first faunistic list of beetles from present-day Hungary.
Otto Merkl
added 2 research items
Seven species of Helodidae, 1 species of Eucinetidae and 3 species of Clambidae are reported from the Kiskunság National Garden (Great Hungarian Plain).
Locality data of 12 species of Scydmaenidae, 6 species of Corylophidae, 1 species of Sphaeriidae, 17 species of Ptiliidae, 4 species of Scaphidiidae, 32 species of Pselaphidae and 54 species of Histeridae are reported from the Kiskunság National Park (Great Hungarian Plain). The ptiliid Ptiliolum schwarzi (Flach, 1887), Microptilium palustre Kuntzen, 1914, Ptinella britannica Matthews, 1872 and the pselaphid Pseudoplectus perplexus (Jacquelin du Val, 1854) and Bibloplectus obtusus Guillebeau, 1888 are new to the fauna of Hungary.
Otto Merkl
added 81 research items
A list of species of 11 families (Byturidae, Peltidae, Cybocephalidae, Rhizophagidae, Monotomidae, Cucujidae, Silvanidae, Cryptophagidae, Phalacridae, Anommatidae and Cerylonidae) belonging to the superfamily Clavicornia is presented from the Kiskunság National Park and the surrounding area (Great Hungarian Plain). Stilbus pannonicus Franz, 1968 is new to the fauna of Hungary.
A list of 30 species of Bruchidae deposited in the Savaria Museum (Szombathely, W Hungary) complemented with label data is given. Eight species are deleted from the Hungarian faunal list. A checklist of the Bruchidae of Hungary (10 genera and 49 species) is presented.
First records of Corticaria dubia Dajoz, 1970, Corticaria inconspicua Wollaston, 1860, Corticarina fulvipes (Comolli, 1837), Enicmus atriceps Hansen, 1962, Latridius pseudominutus (A. Strand, 1958), Melanophthalma sericea (Mannerheim, 1844) and Migneauxia orientalis Reitter, 1877 for the fauna of Hungary are given. Occurrence of Corticarina lambiana (Sharp, 1910) and Stephostethus lardarius (De Geer, 1775) in Hungary is confirmed. A checklist of the Latridiidae of Hungary (67 species) is presented.
Otto Merkl
added 3 research items
During a faunistical exploration of Sǎlaj county carried out in 2014 and 2015, 840 beetle species were recorded, including two species of Community interest (Natura 2000 species): Cucujus cinnaberinus (Scopoli, 1763) and Lucanus cervus Linnaeus, 1758. Notes on the distribution of Augyles marmota (Kiesenwetter, 1850) (Heteroceridae), Trichodes punctatus Fischer von Waldheim, 1829 (Cleridae), Laena reitteri Weise, 1877 (Tenebrionidae), Brachysomus ornatus Stierlin, 1892, Lixus cylindrus (Fabricius, 1781) (Curculionidae), Mylacomorphus globus (Seidlitz, 1868) (Curculionidae) are given.
Deadwood is a major component of forest ecosystems, so it is important to maintain it in order to sustain the saproxylic fauna that depends on it. Beetles play a dominant role in the saproxylic communities, especially in the first, colonisation phase of wood decomposition. The present paper provides an insight into the beetle fauna of the various types of deadwood and suggests measures for supporting the saproxylic beetles.
A total of 266 beetle species are listed from the Maramureş region, northern Romania. The material was collected mainly on Pietroşul Rodnei (Munţii Rodnei), in Munţii Lăpuşului and in the valley of the Iza river.
Otto Merkl
added a research item
A total of 982 species has been identified from the beetle materials collected in the Sas Hill (N 47°28'53", E 19°01'00", Budapest, Hungary). Further 49 species are mentioned in literature sources, but the specimens supporting their validity are unavailable. The species most valuable from points of conservation and faunistics are found in the steppe slopes of the hilltop. Of them, Psilothrix femoralis (Dasytidae) is known only from the Sas Hill in Hungary. Three Natura 2000 species, Lucanus cervus, Morimus funereus and Probaticus subrugosus are also present among the 36 legally protected beetle species, although occurrences of the latter two are proved only by an old specimen and literature reference, respectively.
Otto Merkl
added 2 research items
Two rare species of Onthophagus Latreille, 1802 associated with subterranean rodents were found in a nature protection area where the Hungarian lesser blind mole-rat, Nannospalax hungaricus (Nehring, 1898) is also present. Onthophagus parmatus Reitter, 1892 is reported as new to the fauna of Hungary. Occurrence of Onthophagus kindermanni Harold, 1877 is confirmed in Hungary. With 2 figures and one table.
A faunistic study focused on ground-dwelling Coleoptera was carried out in 2013 in the south-eastern part of the Great Hungarian Plain. A total of 210 pitfall traps were placed in 18 study sites of loess steppe fragments. 234 species were collected, including 29 species legally protected in Hungary, and two species of community interest (Bolbelasmus unicornis and Probaticus subrugosus). Margarinotus distinctus (Erichson, 1834) (Histeridae) and Onthophagus parmatus Reitter, 1892 are new to the fauna of Hungary.
Otto Merkl
added 2 research items
New records of Pilemia tigrina (Mulsant, 1851) from Hungary and Romania are given. Th e records from the Republic of Moldova are summarised. With 4 fi gures.
Cholevinus pallidus rufus (Kraatz, 1870), found in a red fox den entrance is reported for the first time from Hungary. Choleva (Choleva) lederiana pilisensis Růžička et Vávra, 2003, an endemic subspecies from Hungary, is reported from additional localities in Pilis Mts and Buda Hills. With 5 figures.