Project

Better Living | BeLiv - Research initiative for a better coexistence

Goal: Better Living (BeLiv) is a research initiative to foster social equality, mutual habitation, and promote wellbeing. Our goal is to further our understanding of changing world demographics and actions that facilitate better life experiences. We propose a fresh approach to exploring social infrastructures and interactions as mechanisms for health and wellbeing through credible research.

Date: 1 January 2021

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Project log

Adekunle Adedeji
added a research item
Despite the increasing interest in exploring microaggression in the humanitarian context, there remains uncertainty on its mechanism for affecting life outcomes. There is a lack of studies on ethnic and racial minorities in non-western countries. The current research explores dimensions and manifestations of microaggression and how they affect wellbeing in a multicultural setting. The study uses a qualitative approach with 15 focus group discussions (FGDs) and 66 participants conducted in 4 provinces of South Africa: Gauteng (k = 6), NorthWest (k = 3), KwaZulu-Natal (k = 3), and Western Cape (k = 3). The recorded FGDs were transcribed using the intelligent verbatim technique. The transcripts were then analysed using a phenomenological approach. Data analysis was done stepwise using the deductive coding technique. Results show that par-ticipants' perception of the dimensions of microaggression varies depending on the manifestation as verbal, behavioural, or systemic. Furthermore, variations in patterns and reactions to dimensions of microaggression were linked with participants' racial identity. It further confirms that experiencing discrimination is associated with poorer wellbeing. Connectedness to the ingroup provides stability and certainty in multi-group societies due to the group rivalry that pervades such societies.
Johanna Buchcik
added 2 research items
Research in social and humanitarian science has identified socioeconomic status (SES) as one of the essential determinants of quality of life (QoL). Similarly, racial identity is assumed to predict SES outcomes in multiracial settings. Therefore, understanding how racial identity moderates the association between SES and QoL may provide essential insights into the mechanisms generating socioeconomic inequalities and their implication on life outcomes. The current study employs a cross-sectional study designed to investigate the moderating effect of racial identity on the association between SES and QoL in a sample of 1,049 South Africans. A correlation matrix was computed to explore the bivariate associations between QoL, socioeconomic, and sociodemographic features. ANOVA was used to evaluate racial differences in QoL and SES. A moderator analysis was adopted to determine a possible moderating effect of racial identity on the connection between SES and QoL. Findings show a significant difference in QoL and SES based on race. While racial identity was a significant moderator of the association between QoL and SES for Black Africans, no significant moderating effect was reported for other racial groups. These results highlight the importance of racial identity for life outcomes and emphasis the unique experience associated with Black racial identity and its implications for SES, QoL, and their association in South Africa. This study explains the necessity to improve the QoL of minority groups, such as Black South Africans, and offers detailed explanations of their perceived disadvantage.
Adekunle Adedeji
added a research item
The current study examined differences in race relations as a predictor of life satisfaction among South African adults. We analysed data from the South African Social Attitudes Survey 2017 (n = 3 135; female = 61%; black = 61% , coloured/mixed-race = 16%, Indian South Africans = 11%, and white South Africans = 11%; mean age = 43 years, SD = 17.22 years). Linear regression models indicated that positive racial interaction predicted life satisfaction for black Africans, coloured/mixed-race, and the total sample in general. For the black Africans, education, household income, and living standard predicted life satisfaction, while age and household income predicted life satisfaction for the coloured/mixed-race group. Living standard predicted life satisfaction for South African Indians, and age and education predicted life satisfaction for white South Africans. These results support the importance of positive relations and diversity as salient sources of life satisfaction in a society transforming from a history of racial segregation
Adekunle Adedeji
added an update
As part of an ongoing research project to develop a cross-cultural measure of microaggression, we are conducting 17 Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) among four racial groups in 7 cities and 4 South African provinces.
The purpose of these FGDs is to identify established social norms and patterns in social interactions and how they affect health and well-being. At the end of the discussion, we will have semi-structured information on the patterns in cross-cultural/racial interactions and the implications of “implicit bias” on health, well-being.
 
Johanna Buchcik
added a project goal
Better Living (BeLiv) is a research initiative to foster social equality, mutual habitation, and promote wellbeing. Our goal is to further our understanding of changing world demographics and actions that facilitate better life experiences. We propose a fresh approach to exploring social infrastructures and interactions as mechanisms for health and wellbeing through credible research.