Archived project

Barriers to Access

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Project log

Sharon Koehn
added an update
Koehn, S. (2005) Barriers to Access to Care for Ethnic Minority Seniors: Recommendations for provincial and/or federal policy-makers. Briefing paper submitted to the Premier’s Council on Aging and Senior’s Issues, Government of British Columbia, 22nd October 2005.
Koehn, S. (2006). “Continuing Care Access for Ethnic Minority Seniors: Implications for the Future.” Presentation to the Premier’s Council on Aging and Senior’s Issues, Government of British Columbia. Vancouver, B.C. 18th May 2006.
Multiple presentations to community immigrant and seniors’ organizations
 
Sharon Koehn
added a research item
The ‘Barriers to Access to Care for Ethnic Minority Seniors’ (BACEMS) study in Vancouver, British Columbia, found that immigrant families torn between changing values and the economic realities that accompany immigration cannot always provide optimal care for their elders. Ethnic minority seniors further identified language barriers, immigration status, and limited awareness of the roles of the health authority and of specific service providers as barriers to health care. The configuration and delivery of health services, and health-care providers' limited knowledge of the seniors' needs and confounded these problems. To explore the barriers to access, the BACEMS study relied primarily on focus group data collected from ethnic minority seniors and their families and from health and multicultural service providers. The applicability of the recently developed model of ‘candidacy’, which emphasises the dynamic, multi-dimensional and contingent character of health-care access to ethnic minority seniors, was assessed. The candidacy framework increased sensitivity to ethnic minority seniors' issues and enabled organisation of the data into manageable conceptual units, which facilitated translation into recommendations for action, and revealed gaps that pose questions for future research. It has the potential to make Canadian research on the topic more co-ordinated. Also available at http://pubmedcentralcanada.ca/articlerender.cgi?accid=PMC3693980 (open access)