Project

BUILD CARE (Building Support for Children and Families Affected by Stroke)

Goal: Childhood stroke alters the life of children and their families as care continues for many years after stroke onset. We aim to, for the first time, investigate the role of the built environment in the everyday life of children and families affected by this rare disease. We will examine both the informal (i.e. home, neighbourhood, school) and formal (i.e. hospital, rehabilitation clinic, outpatient clinic) care environments. Children and their families, healthcare professionals, and design practitioners will be involved in the project through ethnographic and participatory research methods.

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Project log

Anna-Theresa Renner
added an update
If you are an economist and interested in health economic evaluation, please, check out this PhD position in the BUILD CARE project!
 
Maja Kevdzija
added an update
Another PhD position at the Institute of Architecture and Design at TU Wien is available for anyone interested in joining the BUILD CARE team in Vienna. The PhD researcher will investigate how formal healthcare facilities are designed and adapted in use to care for those affected by childhood stroke. Prof. Christian Kühn and I will supervise the research. If you are interested, please check the detailed description of the position at the link below.
 
Ann Heylighen
added an update
Interested in joining the BUILD CARE project team? At KU Leuven, the Research[x]Design group is hiring a PhD researcher to investigate how informal and formal care environments support or hinder everyday life with childhood stroke. The research will be supervised by myself and Andrea Jelic and conducted in close collaboration with Pleuntje Jellema.
 
Maja Kevdzija
added a project goal
Childhood stroke alters the life of children and their families as care continues for many years after stroke onset. We aim to, for the first time, investigate the role of the built environment in the everyday life of children and families affected by this rare disease. We will examine both the informal (i.e. home, neighbourhood, school) and formal (i.e. hospital, rehabilitation clinic, outpatient clinic) care environments. Children and their families, healthcare professionals, and design practitioners will be involved in the project through ethnographic and participatory research methods.