Project

BARMER. Economic activity, social relations and armed conflitivity in the late Medieval Atlantic Town ports. (PID2020- 118105GBI00)

Goal: This transnational research project focuses on the analysis and comparative study of economic activities, port societies and armed
conflicts in Atlantic ports between 1200 and 1520, involving researchers from several countries of the Atlantic arc.
The fundamental hypothesis is that the medieval European Atlantic port network was a success because it was based on a series of
factors, such as geographical conditions, infrastructures, highly dynamic societies and a governance adaptive to its peripheral position,
issues analyzed in the previous research projects, but also that, in these Atlantic towns, economic activities related to the sea, both fishing
and shipbuilding, but especially the transport of goods and people (men and women) linked to trade, as well as the services linked to them, such as port activities, storage, land transport, finance, insurance, security and naval and coastal surveillance, privateering, piracy and war, among others, were the key factors of the development and economic recovery of late medieval Atlantic Europe .
The main goals of the project are:
1. Reflecting and debating about the theoretical and methodological issues of the economic activities of the Atlantic ports.
2. Studying, in a comparative and transnational way, the development and scope of economic activities and their relationship with
societies, from a perspective of gender history, of the town ports, located on the peripheries of the European Atlantic arc.
3. Researching where, how, when, why and thanks to whom in the town ports of Atlantic Europe were given an economic specialization
towards fishing activities (inshore, high altitude or mixed), transport (short and scopes), shipbuilding and repair, commercial exchange,
piracy or others.
4. Analyzing the interactions between the economic activities related to the sea (fishing, trade, navigation, freight transport, privateering
and piracy ...), the social groups that played a leading role and the institutions and forms of port government along the Atlantic coast of
Europe.
5. Analyzing the Atlantic port environments and their relationship with economic development, human, social and technological progress,
political relations and armed conflicts in the Europe of the 13th-15th centuries.
6. Analyze the role of merchants in the diplomatic relations of ports and states, as well as their ability to influence as lobbies in those
places where they settled, especially in the resolution of conflicts.
7. Studying the above goals from a gender perspective, analyzing the role played by women in port economies and societies, in which they
played a leading role.
8. Contributing positively and accurately to current debates about the role of Europe in the First Globalization
9. Producing contents and working instruments for the research of Atlantic port cities between 1200 and 1520 to be made available to the
scientific community and the general public, such as plans and iconographic material of the Atlantic ports.

This research project is funded by the Spanish Government, Ministery of Science and Innovation. Spanish Research Agency

Date: 1 September 2021 - 30 August 2025

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Project log

Inazio Conde
added a project reference
Jesús Angel Solórzano Telechea
added a project goal
This transnational research project focuses on the analysis and comparative study of economic activities, port societies and armed
conflicts in Atlantic ports between 1200 and 1520, involving researchers from several countries of the Atlantic arc.
The fundamental hypothesis is that the medieval European Atlantic port network was a success because it was based on a series of
factors, such as geographical conditions, infrastructures, highly dynamic societies and a governance adaptive to its peripheral position,
issues analyzed in the previous research projects, but also that, in these Atlantic towns, economic activities related to the sea, both fishing
and shipbuilding, but especially the transport of goods and people (men and women) linked to trade, as well as the services linked to them, such as port activities, storage, land transport, finance, insurance, security and naval and coastal surveillance, privateering, piracy and war, among others, were the key factors of the development and economic recovery of late medieval Atlantic Europe .
The main goals of the project are:
1. Reflecting and debating about the theoretical and methodological issues of the economic activities of the Atlantic ports.
2. Studying, in a comparative and transnational way, the development and scope of economic activities and their relationship with
societies, from a perspective of gender history, of the town ports, located on the peripheries of the European Atlantic arc.
3. Researching where, how, when, why and thanks to whom in the town ports of Atlantic Europe were given an economic specialization
towards fishing activities (inshore, high altitude or mixed), transport (short and scopes), shipbuilding and repair, commercial exchange,
piracy or others.
4. Analyzing the interactions between the economic activities related to the sea (fishing, trade, navigation, freight transport, privateering
and piracy ...), the social groups that played a leading role and the institutions and forms of port government along the Atlantic coast of
Europe.
5. Analyzing the Atlantic port environments and their relationship with economic development, human, social and technological progress,
political relations and armed conflicts in the Europe of the 13th-15th centuries.
6. Analyze the role of merchants in the diplomatic relations of ports and states, as well as their ability to influence as lobbies in those
places where they settled, especially in the resolution of conflicts.
7. Studying the above goals from a gender perspective, analyzing the role played by women in port economies and societies, in which they
played a leading role.
8. Contributing positively and accurately to current debates about the role of Europe in the First Globalization
9. Producing contents and working instruments for the research of Atlantic port cities between 1200 and 1520 to be made available to the
scientific community and the general public, such as plans and iconographic material of the Atlantic ports.
This research project is funded by the Spanish Government, Ministery of Science and Innovation. Spanish Research Agency