Project

Augmented Reality Interactive Educational System (ARETE)

Goal: Augmented reality (AR) refers to computer-mediated reality that changes a person’s perception by adding data to the real environment. It’s considered to be a very effective tool for education. The EU-funded ARETE project aims to build a Europe-wide competitive ecosystem that supports fast dissemination of augmented learning content. ARETE will focus on three pilot studies in STEM, English literacy skills and positive behaviour intervention. The human-centred attitude of the project will boost innovation and creativity, making Europe a world leader of AR and virtual reality in education. The ARETE ecosystem concept will sustain innovation and improve the performance of existing products or services.

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Project log

Fridolin Wild
added 3 research items
Humanoid intelligent agents, or 'Holographic AIs', as we prefer, are trending, promising improved delivery of personalized services on smart glasses and in Augmented Reality. Lacking clarity of the concept and missing recommendations for their features, however, pose a challenge to developers of these novel, embodied agents. In this paper, we therefore conduct a comparative analysis of nine intelligent agents who can interact with both physical and virtual surroundings. We identify, select, and investigate four distinct types of non-player game characters, chatbot agents, simulation agents, and intelligent tutors in order to, subsequently, develop a framework of features and affordances for holographic AIs along the axes of appearance, behavior, intelligence, and responsiveness. Through our analysis, we derive preliminary recommendations for developers of Holographic AIs: the use case determines appearance; dialogue management is key; awareness and adaptation are equally important for successful personalization; and environmental responsiveness to events both in the virtual and digital ream is needed for a seamless experience.
Fridolin Wild
added 2 project references
Fridolin Wild
added 8 research items
This standard defines two description languages for expressing augmented reality (AR) learning experiences. This document shows how to represent activities conducive to developing or upgrading knowledge, skills, abilities, and other characteristics in a standardized interchange format. The interchange format links the representation of learning activities with their environment and context in the actual (or simulated) workplace, classroom, or other environment in which an AR-enhanced training system may execute them. The specification aims to lower entry barriers for authoring of learning experiences that involve interaction with the real world, sensors, computer vision, and web applications.
Immersive technologies are rapidly transforming the field of education. Amongst them, Augmented Reality (AR) has shown promise as a resource, particularly for education in Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics (STEAM). There are, however, few teachers deploying this new medium in the classroom directly, and, consequently, only a few, elect students benefit from the AR-enriched offers. Curricula are already overloaded, and schools generally lack developmental resources, thus leaving no room for experimentation. This situation is further aggravated by the too few educational applications available with sufficient learning content. In this article, we investigate the method of Active Learning for the teaching of STEAM subjects, using a format where students are tasked with building an AR application as part of their learning. We evaluate the applicability of the Active Learning for STEAM subjects with a qualitative, case study approach, applying the workshop format as an extracurricular activity in our work with students from a range of secondary schools in Oxford. We discuss how the format works, so it can be embedded into regular curricula, not just as an extracurricular activity, also providing an overview on the involved teaching units and rationale. All teams in our preview audience of the case study succeeded in building working applications, several of impressive complexity. Students found that the lessons were enjoyable and AR technology can enhance their learning experience. The Active Learning method served as a catalyst for students’ skills development, with the case study providing evidence of learning to code, working with a physics simulation engine, ray-tracing, and geometry, learning how to manage teams and interact with other students/instructors, and engineering a working prototype of a game. We consequentially argue that combining the STEM subjects and the arts, using the proposed Active Learning format, is able to provide a more holistic and engaging education.
This paper presents a novel reference software architecture and supporting pattern language for an augmented reality authoring and training system. Industry-based augmented reality training is considered an essential element of the next techno-industrial revolution. These next generation learning environments allow a trainee to offload complexity and giving them live (or on-demand) feedback on their progress and performance through workplace augmentation is already being taken up by industry forerunners. This reference architecture-for wearable experience for knowledge intensive training-incorporates head-mounted augmented vision, an array of wearable sensors that monitor movement and physiological signals, a data-layer managing sensor data and a cloud-based repository for storing information about the activity and workplace. Moreover, this architecture has been tested in a range of knowledge intensive workplaces, in the aeronautic, medical and space industries. Two iterations of the architecture were developed and validated, together with over 500 participants, producing datasets on activity performance, physiological state and assessment of the platform. The components and links of the architecture are presented here as generalizable design patterns to support wider development. We then propose a pattern language for augmented reality training applications.
Fridolin Wild
added a project goal
Augmented reality (AR) refers to computer-mediated reality that changes a person’s perception by adding data to the real environment. It’s considered to be a very effective tool for education. The EU-funded ARETE project aims to build a Europe-wide competitive ecosystem that supports fast dissemination of augmented learning content. ARETE will focus on three pilot studies in STEM, English literacy skills and positive behaviour intervention. The human-centred attitude of the project will boost innovation and creativity, making Europe a world leader of AR and virtual reality in education. The ARETE ecosystem concept will sustain innovation and improve the performance of existing products or services.