Project

Applying luminescence dating techniques to cave deposits

Goal: Archaeological sequences require accurate and precise numerical chronologies. Simultaneously, these deposits are often stratigraphically complex and therefore challenging to date. I am currently working on several sites in Morocco and the Iberian Peninsula using different luminescence techniques for an internal crosscheck to achieve robust chronologies. These studies are part of the Collaborative Research Centre 806 (Our Way to Europe: Culture-Environment Interaction and Human Mobility in the Late Quaternary, funded by the German Science Foundation) and are conducted in collaboration with colleagues from CRC806 C1 and C2 projects.

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Manuel Alcaraz-Castaño
added a research item
Archaeological sequences require accurate and precise numerical chronologies. Mostly, these sediments are strati-graphically complex and challenging to date. Post-depositional mixing, contamination from a collapsing cave roof, microdosimetry or insufficient bleaching prior to burial may influence the luminescence dating results. Careful sample selection and a good stratigraphic knowledge is crucial for a successful investigation. Numerous studies concentrate on quartz luminescence dating, but recent investigations show the advantage of multi-method optically stimulated luminescence dating approaches to achieve more comprehensive chronologies. For a Moroccan cave site we have compared quartz and potassium feldspar single grain and multiple grain dating for an internal cross-check. Good accordance was observed between quartz and feldspar as well as radiocarbon ages for a sample that represents the stratigraphical unit of the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition. Saturation of the quartz lumines-cence signal was the main limitation when dating various sites in Spain and we have concentrated on potassium feldspar minerals instead. We have applied micromorphology to better understand site formation processes and we used radiocarbon dating, for a chronological crosscheck.
Nicole Klasen
added a project goal
Archaeological sequences require accurate and precise numerical chronologies. Simultaneously, these deposits are often stratigraphically complex and therefore challenging to date. I am currently working on several sites in Morocco and the Iberian Peninsula using different luminescence techniques for an internal crosscheck to achieve robust chronologies. These studies are part of the Collaborative Research Centre 806 (Our Way to Europe: Culture-Environment Interaction and Human Mobility in the Late Quaternary, funded by the German Science Foundation) and are conducted in collaboration with colleagues from CRC806 C1 and C2 projects.