Project

Applied Positive Psychology

Goal: Studying the science of well-being

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Project log

Frawn Morgan
added a research item
As part of the MAPP Applied Positive Interventions course at the University of Pennsylvania, student teams are paired with a service organization to identify needs and opportunities for positive change and provide recommendations informed by positive psychology research. Our team collaborated with the Sister Cities Girlchoir (“SCG”), a non-profit organization empowering girls to transform the world through choir music and performances and sisterhood. Following a situation analysis and literature review, our team generated an application plan intended to enhance one aspect of the weekly sessions with the girls. As part of its weekly 2-hour choir practice, SCG conducts Sister Circle Time, a brief time of roughly 25 minutes with the girls aimed at building supportive and positive relationships. A review of literature focused on resilience, character and leadership development, achievement and mastery, and connection led the team to propose 12 activities to the service partner. Three of these activities were further developed into a curriculum using an outline provided by SCG. Each of the recommended activities is designed to foster character development, gratitude, and belonging, while building positive relationships and connections between the girls.
Frawn Morgan
added a research item
This paper examines the difference between empathy and compassion, explaining the usefulness of each for different social and interpersonal situations.
Frawn Morgan
added a research item
Research has identified that levels of both adolescent and maternal depression have been increasing over the last several generations, as have levels of maternal employment, and that children of depressed mothers are at heightened risk for depression There is speculation by researchers that due to their employment status, working mothers are not only increasing their risk of depression but are also increasing the risk of depression for their children (Goodman & Crouter, 2009; Holmes, Erickson, & Hill, 2012; Liss, Shriffrin, & Rizzo, 2012). However, other research suggests there are also benefits for mothers working outside the home, indicating their well-being may be enhanced by working, potentially providing emotional effects protective against depression (Barnett & Baruch, 1985; Luecken et al., 1997; Sweeting, West, Young, & Der, 2010). These conflicts present a quandary for psychologists attempting to study these phenomena. The nature of the mother-child relationship is a critical factor in depression risk for both mothers and their children, regardless of employment status (Barnett, 2004; Pound, Puckering, Cox, & Mills, 1988; Thapar, Collishaw, Pine & Thapar, 2012; Wills & Brauer, 2012). The field of positive psychology includes concepts and tools that provide opportunities to improve the quality of the mother-child relationship and to enhance the well-being of both mothers and children. Enhanced well-being has been found to be protective against depression (Reivich & Shatté, 2002). Specific relevant concepts and tools are discussed and presented. Having it all-Career, Motherhood, and Emotionally Healthy Children Helping Working Mothers Protect their Children from the Risk of Depression | Request PDF. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/322924137_Having_it_all-Career_Motherhood_and_Emotionally_Healthy_Children_Helping_Working_Mothers_Protect_their_Children_from_the_Risk_of_Depression [accessed Oct 21 2018].
Frawn Morgan
added a research item
Research has identified that levels of both adolescent and maternal depression have been increasing over the last several generations, as have levels of maternal employment, and that children of depressed mothers are at heightened risk for depression There is speculation by researchers that due to their employment status, working mothers are not only increasing their risk of depression but are also increasing the risk of depression for their children. However, other research suggests there are also benefits for mothers working outside the home, indicating their well-being may be enhanced by working, potentially providing emotional effects protective against depression. These conflicts present a quandary for psychologists attempting to study these phenomena. The nature of the mother-child relationship is a critical factor in depression risk for both mothers and their children, regardless of employment status. The field of positive psychology includes concepts and tools that provide opportunities to improve the quality of the mother-child relationship and to enhance the well-being of both mothers and children. Enhanced well-being has been found to be protective against depression. Specific relevant concepts and tools are discussed and presented.
Frawn Morgan
added a project goal
Studying the science of well-being