Project

Analysis of the Ice Nucleating Abilities of Marine Aerosol Particles in the Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico

Goal: The main goals are i) to calculate the concentration of ice nucleating particles (INPs), ii) to identify the main source of INPs in the remote coastal region of Sisal, iii) to estimate the importance of the long range transport of aerosol particles into the Gulf of Mexico

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Project log

Luis A. Ladino
added a research item
Ice nucleating particles (INPs) in the atmosphere are necessary to generate ice crystals in mixed-phase clouds, a crucial component for precipitation development. The sources and composition of INPs are varied: from mineral dust derived from continental erosion to bioaerosols resulting from bubble bursting at the ocean surface. The performance of a home-built droplet freezing assay (DFA) device for quantifying the ice nucleating abilities of water samples via immersion freezing has been validated against both published results and analyses of samples from sea surface microlayer (SML) and bulk surface water (BSW) from the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) and Saanich Inlet, off Vancouver Island (VI), Canada. Even in the absence of phytoplankton blooms, all the samples contained INPs at moderate concentrations, ranging from 6.0x10^1 to 1.1x10^5 L-1 water. The freezing temperatures (i.e., T50, the temperature at which 50% of the droplets freeze) of the samples decreased in order of VI SML > GoM BSW > GoM SML, indicating that the higher latitude coastal waters have a greater potential to initiate cloud formation and precipitation.
Luis A. Ladino
added a research item
Most precipitation from deep clouds over the continents and in the intertropical convergence zone is strongly influenced by the presence of ice crystals, whose formation requires the presence of ice nucleating particles (INP). Although there are a large number of INP sources, the ice nucleating abilities of aerosol particles emitted from oceans, deserts, and wildfires are poorly described at tropical latitudes. To fill this gap in knowledge, the UNAM-MicroOrifice Uniform Deposit Impactor-Droplet Freezing Technique (UNAM-MOUDI-DFT) was built. Aerosol samples were collected in Sisal and Merida, Yucatan (Mexico) under the influence of cold fronts, biomass burning (BB), and African dust (AD), during five short-term field campaigns between January 2017 and July 2018. The three different aerosol types were distinguished by characterizing their physicochemical properties. Marine aerosol (MA), BB, and AD air masses were found to contain INP; the highest concentrations were found for AD (from 0.071 L−1 to 36.07 L−1), followed by MA (from 0.068 L−1 to 18.90 L−1), and BB (from 0.063 L−1 to 10.21 L−1). However, MA had the highest surface active site density (ns) between −15 °C and −30 °C. Additionally, supermicron particles contributed more than 72 % of the total INP concentration independent of aerosol type; MA had the largest contribution from supermicron particles.
Luis A. Ladino
added a research item
Atmospheric aerosol particles that can nucleate ice are referred to as ice-nucleating particles (INPs). Recent studies have confirmed that aerosol particles emitted by the oceans can act as INPs. This very relevant information can be included in climate and weather models to predict the formation of ice in clouds, given that most of them do not consider oceans as a source of INPs. Very few studies that sample INPs have been carried out in tropical latitudes, and there is a need to evaluate their availability to understand the potential role that marine aerosol may play in the hydrological cycle of tropical regions. This study presents results from the first measurements obtained during a field campaign conducted in the tropical village of Sisal, located on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico of the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico in January–February 2017, and one of the few data sets currently available at such latitudes (i.e., 21∘ N). Aerosol particles sampled in Sisal are shown to be very efficient INPs in the immersion freezing mode, with onset freezing temperatures in some cases as high as −3 ∘C, similarly to the onset temperature from Pseudomonas syringae. The results show that the INP concentration in Sisal was higher than at other locations sampled with the same type of INP counter. Air masses arriving in Sisal after the passage of cold fronts have surprisingly higher INP concentrations than the campaign average, despite their lower total aerosol concentration. The high concentrations of INPs at warmer ice nucleation temperatures (T>−15 ∘C) and the supermicron size of the INPs suggest that biological particles may have been a significant contributor to the INP population in Sisal during this study. However, our observations also suggest that at temperatures ranging between −20 and −30 ∘C mineral dust particles are the likely source of the measured INPs.
Luis A. Ladino
added an update
Attached are some preliminary results about the ice nucleating abilities of the marine aerosol particles from the field campaign in Sisal (Yucatan) in January 2017.
 
Luis A. Ladino
added a project goal
The main goals are i) to calculate the concentration of ice nucleating particles (INPs), ii) to identify the main source of INPs in the remote coastal region of Sisal, iii) to estimate the importance of the long range transport of aerosol particles into the Gulf of Mexico