Project

Agricultural Intensification and Dynamics of Soil Carbon Sequestration in Tropical and Temperate Farming systems (DSCATT)

Goal: Identify efficient strategies that foster long term soil carbon sequestration in agricultural systems
- Quantify and model soil carbon sequestration dynamics and its determinants in different agricultural systems at crop-soil, farm and landscape scales
- Deliberate amongst stakeholders about soil carbon sequestration pathways
- Share knowledge, tools and experience on soil management options

Questioned on the 4/1000 initiative on soil carbon (C) sequestration to face climate change (CC), several Labex Agro units and their partners propose to pull together their research capacities in order to provide new insights in soil C sequestration, the DSCATT project proposes to explore the potential for sequestering C in cultivated soils, taking into account the sustainability of agricultural practices in the context of global changes.
DSCATT operates at 4 sites (in Senegal, Zimbabwe, Kenya, and France). The project addresses 3 interrelated scales of fields, farms or territories.
At field level, research focuses on how biomass production and soil C sequestration relate, in different soil and climate conditions. Two approaches complement each other. One studies at the soil-plant interface the processes regulating the forms and residence time of C in soils. It includes the analysis of interactions between nutrients and C storage, the role of deep roots and in soils with contrasting storage potentials. The other approach determines the C balances under different practices. Farms will be characterized in order to propose practices likely to improve complementarities amongst the activities of rural households. At this scale, DSCATT research will focus on farmers' practices (for crops, livestock, forestry…) and assess the impacts of farmers' practices on their objectives (income, food security…), taking into account their main constraints (cash, labour…). The project will assess the social and economic determinants of farmers’ decisions and of trade-offs between farm activities.
At the territory (or farmers' network) level, the different compartments of agroecosystems and the organic matter flows will be studied. The project will analyze the role of the socio-economic and biophysical contexts and will test several possible changes and their impacts on soil C sequestration dynamics, economic performance of farms and food security. This scientific knowledge and the viewpoints of the farmers involved will be shared and used for a transdisciplinary assessment of several C sequestration strategies in agricultural soils. Considering changes and uncertainties, a multi-criteria and prospective evaluation approach is proposed. It will allow iterations between evaluation and redefinition of strategies to cope with global changes in agriculture. The sharing and dissemination of the knowledge enriched by the project will target several audiences (farmers, students and teachers, policy makers) through a variety of communication media and assessment tools.
DSCATT will link the knowledge on processes governing the preservation of C sequestration and farmers' multiple objectives and constraints.

Project cofunded by Agropolis Fondation and Total Fondation (1.6 M€) (2019-2023)

Project Leader: Dr Dominique Masse (IRD)

https://dscatt.net/
@DSCATT_project #DSCATT

Date: 1 April 2019 - 1 March 2023

Updates
0 new
6
Recommendations
0 new
1
Followers
0 new
73
Reads
0 new
701

Project log

Rémi Cardinael
added an update
Estimates of carbon stocks in sandy soils cultivated under local management practices in Senegal’s groundnut basin
 
Rémi Cardinael
added an update
SoilTemp: A global database of near‐surface temperature
 
Rémi Cardinael
added an update
The Rock-Eval ® signature of soil organic carbon in arenosols of the Senegalese groundnut basin. How do agricultural practices matter?
 
Hugo Valls Fox
added an update
Nous cherchons une candidate ou un candidat motivé pour débuter une thèse de 3 ans financée sur l'Évaluation territoriale du rôle de l’intégration agriculture-élevage dans la séquestration du carbone par les sols cultivés en Afrique de l’Ouest, pour plus d'information consultez l'offre est en pièce jointe ou écrivez à hugo.valls-fox@cirad.fr, la date butoir pour les candidatures est le 10 mai 2020. Merci de diffuser largement dans vos réseaux. 
ENGLISH version below / see attachement.
We are seeking a motivated candidate to join us for a fully funded 3 year PhD position on Territorial evaluation of the role of crop-livestock integration in carbon sequestration by cultivated soils in West Africa. For more information see attachement or write to hugo.valls-fox@cirad.fr, please note the application deadline is may 10th 2020. Thank you for transfering the advertisment to relevant networks.
 
Rémi Cardinael
added an update
How far does the tree affect the crop in agroforestry? New spatial analysis methods in a Faidherbia parkland
 
Rémi Cardinael
added an update
The project now has an official website:
and a Twitter account:
@DSCATT_project
#DSCATT
Please follow us and share to get fresh news from the project!
 
Eric Justes
added 2 research items
Cover crops provide ecosystem services such as storing atmospheric carbon in soils after incorporation of their residues. Cover crops also influence soil water balance, which can be an issue in temperate climates with dry summers as for example in southern France and Europe. As a consequence, it is necessary to understand cover crops’ long-term influence on greenhouse gases (GHG) and water balances to assess their potential to mitigate climate change in arable cropping systems. We used the previously calibrated and validated soil-crop model STICS to simulate scenarios of cover crop introduction to assess their influence on rainfed and irrigated cropping systems and crop rotations distributed among five contrasted sites in southern France from 2007-2052. Our results showed that cover crops can improve mean direct GHG balance by 315 kg CO2e ha⁻¹ yr⁻¹ in the long term compared to that of bare soil. This was due mainly to an increase in carbon storage in the soil despite a slight increase in N2O emissions which can be compensate by adapting fertilization. Cover crops also influence the water balance by reducing mean annual drainage by 20 mm yr⁻¹ but increasing mean annual evapotranspiration by 20 mm yr⁻¹ compared to those of bare soil. Using cover crops to improve the GHG balance may help to mitigate climate change by decreasing CO2e emitted in cropping systems which can represent a decrease from 4.5 to 9% of annual GHG emissions of the French agriculture and forestry sector. However, if not well managed, they also could create water management issues in watersheds with shallow groundwater. Relationships between cover crop biomass and its influence on several variables such as drainage, carbon sequestration and GHG emissions could be used to extend our results to other conditions to assess the cover crops influence in a wider range of areas.
Agriculture contributes to a significant proportion of global emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) but can also participate in climate change mitigation. The introduction of legumes in crop rotations reduces the dependence on N fertilizers and may mitigate the carbon (C) footprint of cropping systems. The aim of this study was to quantify the C footprint of six low-input arable cropping systems resulting from the combination of three levels of grain legumes introduction in a 3-yr rotation (GL0: no grain legumes, GL1: 1 grain legume, GL2: 2 grain legumes) and the use of cover crops (CC) or bare fallow (BF) between cash crops, covering two rotation cycles (6 years). The approach considered external emissions, on-site emissions and soil organic carbon (SOC) stock changes, and rioritized (i) field observations and (ii) simulation of non-measured variables with the STICS model, rather than default emission factors. As expected, fertilizers accounted for 80–90% of external emissions, being reduced by 50% and 102% with grain legumes introduction in GL1-BF and GL2-BF, compared to the cereal-based rotation (GL0-BF). Cover crops management increased machinery emissions by 24–35% compared to BF. Soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions were low, ranging between 205 and 333 kg CO2 eq. ha−1 yr−1 in GL1-BF and GL0-BF, respectively. Nitrate leaching represented the indirect emission of 11.6 to 27.2 kg CO2 eq. ha−1 yr−1 in the BF treatments and 8.2 to 10.7 kg CO2 eq. ha−1 yr−1 in the CC treatments. Indirect emissions due to ammonia volatilization ranged between 8.4 and 41.8 kg CO2 eq. ha−1 yr−1. The introduction of grain legumes strongly influenced SOC changes and, consequently, the C footprint. In the BF systems, grain legumes introduction in the rotations led to a significant increase in the C footprint, because of higher SOC losses. Contrarily, the use of cover crops mitigated SOC losses, and lowered the C footprint. These results indicated the need of CC when increasing the number of grain legumes in cereal-based rotations. Despite the multiple known benefits of introducing grain legumes in cropping systems our research highlights the need to consider soil organic carbon changes in environmental assessments.
Rémi Cardinael
added a project goal
Identify efficient strategies that foster long term soil carbon sequestration in agricultural systems
- Quantify and model soil carbon sequestration dynamics and its determinants in different agricultural systems at crop-soil, farm and landscape scales
- Deliberate amongst stakeholders about soil carbon sequestration pathways
- Share knowledge, tools and experience on soil management options
Questioned on the 4/1000 initiative on soil carbon (C) sequestration to face climate change (CC), several Labex Agro units and their partners propose to pull together their research capacities in order to provide new insights in soil C sequestration, the DSCATT project proposes to explore the potential for sequestering C in cultivated soils, taking into account the sustainability of agricultural practices in the context of global changes.
DSCATT operates at 4 sites (in Senegal, Zimbabwe, Kenya, and France). The project addresses 3 interrelated scales of fields, farms or territories.
At field level, research focuses on how biomass production and soil C sequestration relate, in different soil and climate conditions. Two approaches complement each other. One studies at the soil-plant interface the processes regulating the forms and residence time of C in soils. It includes the analysis of interactions between nutrients and C storage, the role of deep roots and in soils with contrasting storage potentials. The other approach determines the C balances under different practices. Farms will be characterized in order to propose practices likely to improve complementarities amongst the activities of rural households. At this scale, DSCATT research will focus on farmers' practices (for crops, livestock, forestry…) and assess the impacts of farmers' practices on their objectives (income, food security…), taking into account their main constraints (cash, labour…). The project will assess the social and economic determinants of farmers’ decisions and of trade-offs between farm activities.
At the territory (or farmers' network) level, the different compartments of agroecosystems and the organic matter flows will be studied. The project will analyze the role of the socio-economic and biophysical contexts and will test several possible changes and their impacts on soil C sequestration dynamics, economic performance of farms and food security. This scientific knowledge and the viewpoints of the farmers involved will be shared and used for a transdisciplinary assessment of several C sequestration strategies in agricultural soils. Considering changes and uncertainties, a multi-criteria and prospective evaluation approach is proposed. It will allow iterations between evaluation and redefinition of strategies to cope with global changes in agriculture. The sharing and dissemination of the knowledge enriched by the project will target several audiences (farmers, students and teachers, policy makers) through a variety of communication media and assessment tools.
DSCATT will link the knowledge on processes governing the preservation of C sequestration and farmers' multiple objectives and constraints.
Project cofunded by Agropolis Fondation and Total Fondation (1.6 M€) (2019-2023)
Project Leader: Dr Dominique Masse (IRD)
@DSCATT_project #DSCATT