Project

Aesthetic Interferences Book

Goal: The publishing the rewrited and updated text of my dissertation Master's degree (2011), IN English.
"This book shows an analytic look at the Animation, especially, at the Stop motion. There are many things that technological development and the paradigm shift from material to virtual work can make us fail to see and record, and thus, be completely lost. This book is not intended to discuss historical or technical issues, but to analyze some animations, from their identity as creative and non-digital works. As expressions of artwork, these shorts stand out for the beauty, for the technical quality and for their messages that are so necessary nowadays.
To achieve this goal, it is observed five short films of animation: Neighbours (McLaren, 1952), De Janela Pro Cinema [From Window to Cinema] (Rodrigues, 1999), The Old Man and the Sea (Petrov, 2000), Adagio (Bardin, 2000) and Aria (Sapegin, 2001).
The analyzes were based on the concepts of the semiotics, the simulacrum, the cinema, the theater, the narrative and the communication theory. So, it is possible to verify how the aesthetic variety, definitely, interferes in the final result of the work, often visually contributing to “tell the story.” "

However, to print this book, there is a crowdfunding campaign. If someone can become a backer, and/or share and help with this idea, here ar the links:
https://igg.me/at/SMBook
Books preview - https://issuu.com/a.interferences/docs/book-2
Fanpage - https://www.facebook.com/aestheticinterferences
(with many informations about animation and the campaign)

Thanks for the interest! :)

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Eliane Gordeeff
added a research item
Aesthetic Interferences: The stop motion technique in the animation narrative has the objective of analysing how the materiality of this technique influences the visual information, complementing and assisting the animated narrative, how expressiveness can be manifested by the physical, representative and/or symbolic use of the material, and used in the elaboration of the image for an animated narrative. In this process, the aesthetics of the animation technique are analysed, considering the narrative, with a consequent methodology of evaluation of aesthetic forms and possibilities, this form of analysis perhaps being a means of deepening the representative aspect of an animated production, so that the (visual) form allied to the content (narrative) achieve their objective (audience empathy).
Eliane Gordeeff
added 3 research items
Just as colour determines a visual sensation, form and texture also frame it, materializing the artist’s intention and message. Much has been written about techniques, new technologies, new equipment, and animation software and effects. There are also many books on film language, the study of movement, light, techniques of animation, how to build a character, and other technicalities. However, there is still much to study about how the impact of the animated image is processed, in terms of the artistic/emotional empathy of the viewer (receiver), besides what are the influences of the material processes used in the creation of these images in the “storytelling”, and what they are like. The aesthetic language of Animation is directly connected to the technique used to cheer us up. Aesthetic Interferences: The Stop Motion Technique in the Animation Narrative has the objective of analysing how the materiality of the technique influences the visual information, complementing and assisting the animated narrative, how expressiveness can be manifested by the physical, representative and/or symbolic use of the material, and used in the elaboration of the image for an animated narrative. In this process the aesthetics of the animation technique is analysed, considering its narrative, with a consequent methodology of evaluation of aesthetic forms and possibilities, this form of analysis perhaps being a means of deepening the representative aspect of an animated production, so that the (visual) form allied to the content (narrative), achieve their objective (audience empathy). Consequently, only some productions that have certain characteristics serve as examples for this analysis, although it should be emphasized that no reflections about their authors were considered. What matters is the visual result of their works, and the way the animators / directors achieved it, not the work of the animators themselves as creators. Due to its unique characteristics, the set of techniques called stop motion stands out. This term is commonly known as being synonymous with the animation of puppets, but its original meaning is considered to be that of frame-by-frame animation with stop motion of the object to be animated, regardless of the nature of this object – be it puppet, paint, string or people. Another characteristic to be considered is the self-destructiveness of the technique: for each new frame, it is necessary to modify the previous one which gets lost in the process. Thus, when analysing how the expressiveness of the action and the emotion of the narrative can be represented by diverse materials, five short films that effectively translate this characteristic were chosen: • Neighbours - People and object animations; • De Janela Pro Cinema [Cinema From a Window] - Puppet animation; • Aria - Puppet animation; • The Old Man and the Sea - Painting on glass; • Adagio - Animation of objects (paper and puppets). These animations are part of the “class” of so-called animations with narrative style, but on the fringes of the commercial market, where individual technique, artistic challenge, and selfexpression are more present in the search for a new perspective in the exploration of the medium/technique. With this choice, the material is rich in pictorial expressiveness, propitious to the analysis, but with a fixed reference strategy – the narrative – that allows a better evaluation and elaboration of conjectures about the object of study (the aesthetic interference) as it presents a defined objective (the author’s intention is known), unlike the so-called abstract animations, where there is an absence of explicit narrative. This book is divided into four chapters. The first is intended to give a brief historical overview of the stop motion technique – to orientate the reader about its development over time, and inform how technological advances have interfered in this process. In the second chapter a summary of two aspects considered in the book is presented: the semiotics of animated aesthetics, and some questions on narrative. On the symbolic issues of animation, considerations are addressed on plastic, cinematographic, and virtual issues, based mainly on the studies of Roland Barthes (1915-1980), Jean Baudrillard (1929-2007), and Edmond Couchot. In relation to narrative, questions about verisimilitude, the impression of reality, and the suspension of disbelief are tackled in view of the universe of animation, and within which context the works of Jacques Aumont, Sergei Eisenstein (1898-1948), Tzvetan Todorov (1939-2017) and Christian Metz (1931-1993) are fundamental. The third chapter is devoted to the analysis of the films themselves, based on the subjects discussed in the previous chapter and with the help of other thinkers and scholars, along with information obtained through interviews with the authors of the animations and/or reports, as well as testimonials. Due to the visual and narrative variety of these animations, the analyses will be similar but will not follow the same formatting, with attention being given to and emphasising precisely to the diversity they present. In this chapter as well as the following, my own experience as an animator and lover of live-action movies was fundamental. Closing this book, we present the “Conclusion” about the set of ideas presented in this work. As a consequence of the passing years, this text was updated, rewritten and adapted in relation to the original, presented for the Master’s degree dissertation of the Graduate Program in Visual Arts of the School of Fine Arts of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, in 2011.
The stop motion technique in animation narrative Eliane Gordeeff he aesthetic language of Animation is directly connected to the technique used to cheer us up. Aesthetic Interferences: The stop motion technique in the animation narrative has the objective of analysing how the materiality of this technique influences the visual information, complementing and assisting the animated narrative, how expressiveness can be manifested by the physical, representative and/or symbolic use of the material, and used in the elaboration of the image for an animated narrative. In this process, the aesthetics of the animation technique are analysed, considering the narrative, with a consequent methodology of evaluation of aesthetic forms and possibilities, this form of analysis perhaps being a means of deepening the representative aspect of an animated production, so that the (visual) form allied to the content (narrative) achieve their objective (audience empathy).
Este artigo vem propor um olhar analítico sobre a arte animada, em especial sobre a técnica Stop motion, a partir de suas características e como estas são empregadas na construção de uma narrativa audiovisual. Através da análise de alguns curtas-metragens de cunho narrativo, realizadas em Stop motion, é analisado como a materialidade da técnica influi na informação visual complementando e auxiliando a contar suas histórias. São eles: Vizinhos (1952, de Norman McLaren), De Janela pro Cinema (1999, de Quiá Rodrigues), O Velho e o Mar (2000, de Alexander Petrov), Adágio (2000, de Garri Bardin) e Ária (2001, de Piotr Sapegin). Primeiramente são realizadas reflexões sobre a Animação, o Cinema e o Teatro, onde são consideradas às suas representatividades e narrativas, que servem de terreno para as análises em questão, tendo em vista principalmente os trabalhos de Jayne Pilling (1977), Marina Graça (2006), Paul Wells (1998); Christian Metz (1972, 1980), Jacques Aumont (2008), Andrei Tarkovski (2002), Aristóteles, Tzvetan Todorov (1970) e Janson Surrel (2009); Patrice Pavis (1996) e Darci Kusano (1993). A partir desse ponto, foram realizadas as análises de casos, considerando-se os conceitos da semiótica – desenvolvidos por Roland Barthes (2009) e Martine Joly (1996) – que unidos aos da teoria da comunicação – apresentados por Albert Kienstz (1973) – e do simulacro – avançados por Jean Baudrillard (1994) – criaram um conjunto de considerações e um ponto de vista diferenciado e relevante ao trabalho, sendo apresentado nas conclusões. Assim foi possível compreender como a expressividade pode ser apresentada através do uso físico, representativo e/ou simbólico do material (ou objeto) utilizado na elaboração da imagem, na produção de uma narrativa de animação. E como a variedade estética dessas formas de animar interfere definitivamente no resultado final do trabalho, muitas vezes contribuindo visualmente para “contar a história”. Por consequência, o texto amplia a compreensão sobre a riqueza estética da Animação – enquanto arte, técnica e meio de mensagem. Este texto é uma síntese e uma pequena atualização de um estudo maior, uma dissertação de mestrado em Artes Visuais, defendida em 2011, no Programa de Pós-graduação da Escola de Belas Artes da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, e que está em vias de tornar-se um livro ainda este ano.
Eliane Gordeeff
added a project goal
The publishing the rewrited and updated text of my dissertation Master's degree (2011), IN English.
"This book shows an analytic look at the Animation, especially, at the Stop motion. There are many things that technological development and the paradigm shift from material to virtual work can make us fail to see and record, and thus, be completely lost. This book is not intended to discuss historical or technical issues, but to analyze some animations, from their identity as creative and non-digital works. As expressions of artwork, these shorts stand out for the beauty, for the technical quality and for their messages that are so necessary nowadays.
To achieve this goal, it is observed five short films of animation: Neighbours (McLaren, 1952), De Janela Pro Cinema [From Window to Cinema] (Rodrigues, 1999), The Old Man and the Sea (Petrov, 2000), Adagio (Bardin, 2000) and Aria (Sapegin, 2001).
The analyzes were based on the concepts of the semiotics, the simulacrum, the cinema, the theater, the narrative and the communication theory. So, it is possible to verify how the aesthetic variety, definitely, interferes in the final result of the work, often visually contributing to “tell the story.” "
However, to print this book, there is a crowdfunding campaign. If someone can become a backer, and/or share and help with this idea, here ar the links:
(with many informations about animation and the campaign)
Thanks for the interest! :)