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Adlerian therapy: A Positive Counseling Approach

Goal: Book chapter for "Positive Counseling" (Garrett McAuliffe, Editor). The chapter overviews Adlerian therapy and discussing how it is a positive psychology and positive approach to counseling and psychotherapy; arguably, the first positive psychology and counseling approach.

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Richard E. Watts
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This chapter overviews Adlerian therapy and discusses how it is the original positive psychology and positive approach to counseling and psychotherapy.
Richard E. Watts
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The chapter I wrote in Garrett McAuliffe's (Ed.) edited text "Positive Counseling: A Guide to Assessing and Enhancing Client Strength and Growth" is now in print. It is published by Cognella. The citation for the chapter:
Watts, R. E. (2019). Adlerian therapy: A positive counseling approach. In G. J. McAuliffe (Ed.), Positive counseling: A guide to assessing and enhancing client strength and growth (pp. 209-231). San Diego, CA: Cognella.
 
Richard E. Watts
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Awaiting page proofs. Should be published in early 2018.
 
Richard E. Watts
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Adlerian therapy is an integrative, encouragement-focused counseling approach that stresses prevention and education rather than simply remediation, mental health and wellness rather than mental illness, and clients’ strengths assets, and abilities rather than their weaknesses and liabilities. Alfred Adler (1870-1937), the developer of Adlerian therapy, was a colleague of Sigmund Freud from 1902-1911 but, due to significant theory and practice disagreements, Adler left the Viennese Psychoanalytic Society in 1911. Most scholars appear to be unaware of the evolution of Adler's theory/therapy development. During his time with Freud and prior to World War I (1914-1918), Adler focused more on abnormal human behavior and was rather psychoanalytic in his practice. He served as a field physician in WWI, and his experience of the war profoundly affected him. After the war, he was more interested in normal human behavior, and his counseling approach became encouragement-focused, with an emphasis on clients’ strengths and abilities. During this later positive period, Adler functioned less like a psychiatrist and more like a community psychologist, social activist, educator, and counselor. - Excerpt from Adlerian Therapy: A Positive Counseling Approach, a chapter I wrote for the forthcoming book POSITIVE COUNSELING (Garrett Mcauliffe, Editor).
 
Richard E. Watts
added a project goal
Book chapter for "Positive Counseling" (Garrett McAuliffe, Editor). The chapter overviews Adlerian therapy and discussing how it is a positive psychology and positive approach to counseling and psychotherapy; arguably, the first positive psychology and counseling approach.