Project

Active Learning in Political Science Teaching

Goal: SoTL-inspired research on active learning methods in political science teaching in higher education. Topics include the inverted or flipped classroom, competence-oriented testing and the use of simulations.

Methods: Survey Data, Regression

Updates
0 new
2
Recommendations
0 new
0
Followers
0 new
17
Reads
0 new
188

Project log

Daniel Lambach
added an update
Two years after being accepted, our paper "Inverting the Classroom in Large-Enrollment Classes: A Beginner’s Guide" has finally been published in the most recent issue of the Journal of Political Science Education. Let me know if you'd like a copy!
 
Daniel Lambach
added a research item
The inverted classroom model (ICM) has started to attract attention as a pedagogical approach in political science teaching. While there are many publications describing the application of the model in single courses and analyzing students’ performance in inverted classes, the existing literature provides little guidance for first-time users of the model. In this Political Science Instruction article, we offer a beginner’s guide for preparing and applying the ICM to assist other instructors who wish to invert their classes based on our repeated experiences with the ICM in an introductory International Relations course. Employing a constructive alignment approach, we show how a course can be broken into learning units, each with an online preparatory phase geared toward knowledge acquisition and attendance and follow-up phases focused on application and the development of higher-order cognitive learning objectives. To deal with frequent challenges and pitfalls, we recommend trying a partial inversion first, inverting a familiar course, being prepared for initial resistance from students, sticking with the concept, rethinking theinstructor’s role in the classroom, and combining tight planning but flexible execution of the attendance phase.
Daniel Lambach
added a research item
The Inverted Classroom Model (ICM) has started to attract attention as a pedagogical approach in political science teaching. While there are many publications describing the application of the model in single courses and analyzing students' performance in inverted classes, the existing literature provides little guidance for first-time users of the model. In this Political Science Instruction article, we offer a beginner's guide for preparing and applying the ICM to assist other instructors who wish to invert their classes based on our repeated experiences with the ICM in an introductory International Relations course. Employing a constructive alignment approach, we show how a course can be broken into learning units, each with an online preparatory phase geared towards knowledge acquisition and attendance and follow-up phases focused on application and the development of higher-order cognitive learning objectives. To deal with frequent challenges and pitfalls we recommend trying a partial inversion first, inverting a familiar course, being prepared for initial resistance from students, sticking with the concept, rethinking the instructor's role in the classroom, and combining tight planning but flexible execution of the attendance phase.
Daniel Lambach
added an update
I've added a new preprint! It's from a study of alumni from different MA programs in peace and conflict studies in Germany and Austria. Patricia Schneider and I have looked at where they work, under which conditions they work and what this implies for our teaching.
Forthcoming in the Zeitschrift für Friedens- und Konfliktforschung. It's in German only but if you have question I'd be happy to answer them.
 
Daniel Lambach
added a research item
Seit 2002 sind in Deutschland und Österreich mehrere Studienangebote in der Friedens-und Konfliktforschung geschaffen worden. Diese vermitteln Studierenden analytische und praktische Kompetenzen, um sie für friedens-und konfliktrelevante Berufsfelder zu qualifizieren. Wie gut dies gelingt, ist jedoch bislang nicht jenseits standortbezogener Evaluationen erforscht worden. In diesem Artikel stellen wir die Ergebnisse einer im Herbst 2017 durchgeführten gemeinsamen Absolvent*innenstudie der Studiengänge aus dem Bereich Friedens-und Konfliktforschung an den Universitäten Duisburg-Essen, Frankfurt a. M./Darmstadt, Hamburg, Innsbruck, Konstanz, Magdeburg und Tübingen vor. Die Ergebnisse zeichnen ein insgesamt positives Bild-die Absolvent*innen arbeiten mehrheitlich in anspruchsvollen Berufsfeldern, auf die sie sich durch ihr Masterstudium angemessen vorbereitet fühlen; der Anteil arbeitsloser Absolvent*innen ist gering. Allerdings arbeitet unter den beschäftigten Befragten ein hoher Anteil in befristeten Arbeitsverhältnissen oder in anderen Formen unsicherer Beschäftigung. Der Beitrag diskutiert diese Ergebnisse in Hinblick auf die Weiterentwicklung des akademischen Lehrangebots in der Friedens-und Konfliktforschung. Schlüsselwörter: Studiengänge Friedens-und Konfliktforschung, Absolventen*innenbefragung, Berufsperspektiven, Kompetenzen, berufliche Relevanz * * Als die Studie durchgeführt wurde, war Daniel Lambach noch an der Universität Duisburg-Essen tätig. Wir danken Eckhard Schlopsna (Institut für Friedensforschung und Sicherheitspolitik an der Universität Hamburg-IFSH), Jonas Elis, Barbara Hillebrand und Daniel Gräfingholt (Universität Duisburg-Essen) sowie den Studiengangsverantwortlichen der beteiligten Studiengänge für ihre Unterstützung bei der Durchführung dieser Befragung sowie der Redaktion der Zeitschrift für Friedens-und Konfliktforschung für ihre hilfreichen Anregungen. Dieser Beitrag wurde von den Herausgeber*innen der Zeitschrift für Friedens-und Konfliktforschung einer single-blind Begutachtung unterzogen. Since 2002, several courses of study in peace and conflict research have been created in Germany and Austria. These provide students with analytical and practical skills to qualify them for peace and conflict relevant occupational fields. However, there has been no systematic analysis whether this goal is being attained. In this article, we present the results of a joint graduate study on peace and conflict studies at the Universities of Duisburg-Essen, Frankfurt a. M./Darmstadt, Hamburg, Innsbruck, Konstanz, Magdeburg and Tübingen. The results paint a generally positive picture-the majority of the graduates work in demanding occupational fields and feel adequately prepared through their M.A. studies. The proportion of unemployed graduates is low. However, among those employed, a high proportion work under fixed-term contracts or in other forms of unsafe employment. The paper discusses the findings with regard to the further development of academic teaching in peace and conflict research.
Daniel Lambach
added a research item
Die politikwissenschaftliche Hochschullehre spielt eine wichtige Rolle für die Demokratiefähigkeit von Studierenden. Zur Vermittlung von Demokratiekompetenz sind aber Lehrvorträge nicht gut geeignet, aktives Lernen dagegen sehr viel eher. Dieser Beitrag fasst die Forschung zur Wirkung aktiver Lehr-Lernformen zusammen und verbindet diese mit Mays Modell der Demokratiekompetenz. Er diskutiert Implikationen für politikwissenschaftliche Lehre sowie die Rolle der Lehrenden.
Daniel Lambach
added 4 research items
The inverted classroom model (ICM) has been successfully used in many disciplines. ICM is an active learning approach that reserves class meetings for hands-on exercises while shifting content learning to the preparatory stage. Multiple studies report better student learning, engagement and satisfaction in ICM classes. ICM is also alleged to better address the diversity of students with different learning styles and levels of preparedness. The technique has been used in IR but there have been few systematic evaluations of ICM's efficacy in large lecture classes in the discipline. Larger class size is a challenge for ICM but it allows the pursuit of higher-order learning objectives than the passive reception of content that characterizes traditional lectures. This paper reports results from an application of the inverted classroom to an introductory IR course during the winter semester 2014/15 at the University of Duisburg-Essen. It first reviews the literature on inverting large lecture classes and then presents our approach for this particular class. We then present preliminary results on ICM's effects on student learning, measured in terms of students' self-assessment, and on student attitudes about the ICM as a teaching method compared to a traditional lecture format.. This project has been funded by the Stifterverband für die deutsche Wissenschaft. We are grateful to Anna Ebert, Achim Görres, Florian Rabuza, Tobias Rammel and Sylvia Ruschin for their assistance. 2
The lecture is an established form of teaching in political science. Unfortunately, the effectiveness of the format is limited, especially for developing higher-level cognitive competences. The Inverted Classroom Model (ICM) mitigates these weaknesses, offering a space for (inter)active learning. However, political science, as other social sciences, has been slow to adopt the ICM approach. This article discusses several possible explanations for this lack of teaching innovation in our field. It also presents an example of how to apply the ICM to an introductory large lecture course in international relations. We aim to contextualize our ICM application by comparing our approach to that used in other disciplines and discuss differences and challenges resulting from heterogeneous disciplinary cultures.
Daniel Lambach
added 2 research items
Auf welche Weise erzielen Studierende in politikwissenschaftlichen Großveranstaltungen den besten Lernerfolg? Anstatt die Studierenden in einer klassischen Vorlesung zu passiven Wissenskonsumenten zu machen, ist der „Flipped Classroom“ oder „Inverted Classroom“ eine vielversprechende Alternative, die auf die Aktivierung der Studierenden setzt. Dabei wird die Vorlesungszeit zur Großübung in kleinen Arbeitsgruppen, während strukturierte Übersichtsinformationen und Aufgaben zur Vermittlung und Erarbeitung von grundlegendem Wissen in Form von Lektüre und Videos aus der gemeinsamen Vorlesungszeit in die Vorbereitungszeit der Studierenden verlagert werden. Dieser Artikel stellt das innovative Format des Flipped Classroom (FC) vor und bewertet es vorläufig anhand von explorativer Evidenz einer Methodenvorlesung im ersten Fachsemester des BA Politikwissenschaft an der Universität Duisburg-Essen.
Daniel Lambach
added 2 research items
Studiengänge der Friedens- und Konfliktforschung sollen Studierenden neben einem umfassenden Wissensbestand auch praxis- und anwendungsbezogene Kompetenzen vermitteln. Dies verlangt Veranstaltungsformate, die Lernprozesse zur aktiven Aneignung dieser Kompetenzen ermöglichen. Das Inverted Classroom Model (ICM) stellt eine Möglichkeit dar, in Vorlesungen und Seminaren Freiräume für aktives Lernen zu schaffen, indem passive Lernaktivitäten in die Vorbereitungsphasen einer Veranstaltungssitzung verlagert werden und Präsenzphasen zur Einübung und Anwendung höherwertiger Kompetenzziele genutzt werden. Der vorliegende Beitrag soll eine Hilfestellung sein, Kurse im ICM-Format zu konzipieren und umzusetzen. Dazu werden zunächst das ICM und seine Wirksamkeit kurz vorgestellt. Darauf basierend diskutieren wir anhand eigener Erfahrungen Schritte zur Konzeption eines ICM-Kurses sowie der einzelnen Lerneinheiten. Abschließend resümieren wir verschiedene Herausforderungen der Umsetzung einer Lehrveranstaltung im ICM-Format und geben insbesondere für Kolleg_innen, die erstmals an einer Kursgestaltung im ICM-Format interessiert sind, Ratschläge zur Umsetzung.
Daniel Lambach
added a research item
The inverted classroom model (ICM) is an active learning approach that reserves class meetings for hands-on exercises while shifting content learning to the preparatory stage. The ICM offers possibilities for pursuing higher-order learning objectives even in large classes. However, there are contradicting reports about students’ reactions to this kind of teaching innovation. With the ICM making inroads in political science teaching, this paper discusses how students evaluate this method. We report results from an application of the ICM to an introductory international relations course. In our course, students’ reactions to the ICM varied greatly. Using a regression analysis of student evaluation scores, we find that students’ preference for collaborative learning best predicted their preference for the ICM over the traditional lecture format.
Daniel Lambach
added a research item
Die Themengruppe „Hochschullehre“ der Deutschen Vereinigung für Politische Wissenschaft (DVPW) hat sich am 25. September 2015 bei der DVPW-Tagung in Duisburg gegründet. An der Gründungsversammlung nahmen 25 PolitikwissenschaftlerInnen unterschiedlicher Teildisziplinen und Statusgruppen aus ganz Deutschland teil, weitere 35 hatten sich vorab auf einer eigens eingerichteten Mailingliste eingetragen, um über den Gründungsprozess informiert zu werden. Inzwischen ist die Gruppe auf über 100 Mitglieder angewachsen. Die AutorInnen dieses Artikels wurden auf dem Gründungstreffen als SprecherInnen der Themengruppe mit einer Amtszeit von drei Jahren gewählt. Eines unserer wichtigsten Anliegen ist, dass Fragen der Hochschullehre in der deutschen Politikwissenschaft sichtbarer werden. Die Themengruppe dient dabei als instituts- und universitätsübergreifendes Netzwerk, um Erfahrungen auszutauschen und voneinander zu lernen, aber auch um für die Belange der Lehre und der Lehrenden im Hochschulalltag einzutreten. In diesem Beitrag fassen wir die Entstehung der Gruppe zusammen, legen ihr Selbstverständnis dar und stellen die Ziele und Maßnahmen vor, die wir uns als SprecherInnen vorgenommen haben. Damit möchten wir für die Themengruppe werben und PolitikwissenschaftlerInnen in der DVPW zur Mitarbeit aufrufen.
Daniel Lambach
added a project goal
SoTL-inspired research on active learning methods in political science teaching in higher education. Topics include the inverted or flipped classroom, competence-oriented testing and the use of simulations.