Archived project

Accounting for Values in Design

Goal: As computing technologies’ pervasiveness grows, so will the scale of their ethical implications. Rather than wait for such issues to reach their full scale, we aim to anticipate and address these issues during new pervasive computing technologies’ design. To meet this overall objective, we aim to provide techniques with which to analyze how existing Pervasive Computing technologies affect various types of values and with which to elicit the various types of values on which these analyses focus.

Date: 28 October 2016

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Koen V. Hindriks
added 4 research items
As software plays an increasingly important role in people's lives, the impact it has on their values frequently becomes apparent. Many software design methods address "soft issues", but very few address values explicitly. We present six principles that design methods should meet in order to properly deal with values. One area in which adherence to stakeholder values is important, is Agent-Oriented Software Engineering (AOSE). The Tropos AOSE method, with its concept of soft-goal, comes close to meeting our principles, but does not address values explicitly. Value-Sensitive Design is a methodology that does explicitly address value issues, but it offers little guidance in operationalizing them. We discuss a case study in which we attempt to capture values in Tropos' soft-goals after eliciting them using Value-Sensitive Design. Subsequently, we discuss to what extent Tropos adheres to our principles. Finally, we propose the introduction of values as a first-class entity in Tropos in order to meet our aims of dealing with values.
Pervasive computing technologies offer solutions to many of the problems people face in aging. In doing so, they have the potential to support certain values such as human welfare. However, these solutions also have the potential to diminish human values such as trust, privacy and autonomy. Many of such value issues are recurrent, general problems that play out in specific application contexts. By accounting for values during the design of technology, designers would be in a better position to create technology that supports rather than hinders the values of its stakeholders. Yet, there are few methodical approaches to dealing with values in design. Moreover, knowledge on how specific value problems can be tackled is not captured systematically in a reusable way. We propose using Value Sensitive Design to analyze recurrent problems and identify affected stakeholders and their values. We use these analyses as a starting point for generating design patterns, or reusable solutions to recurrent problems, that explicitly include value considerations. We provide an initial set of value-sensitive design patterns as a proof-of-concept.
Ambient Intelligence Systems are complex, knowledge providing systems. The group of intended users typically comprises both various kinds of professionals and of laymen. In this chapter we address responsibility issues associated with the use and design of AmISs. We explain the connection between knowledge and responsibility, and use that connection to show that the usage of Ambient Intelligence Systems leads to moral responsibilities for all types of users (professionals and otherwise). It follows from the same reasoning scheme applied to the role of the AmIS developer, that she is responsible to design the system for responsible use. We give some initial criteria for such design for responsibility of AmISs.
Koen V. Hindriks
added a project goal
As computing technologies’ pervasiveness grows, so will the scale of their ethical implications. Rather than wait for such issues to reach their full scale, we aim to anticipate and address these issues during new pervasive computing technologies’ design. To meet this overall objective, we aim to provide techniques with which to analyze how existing Pervasive Computing technologies affect various types of values and with which to elicit the various types of values on which these analyses focus.