Archived project

Abstracting Domain-Specific Information Retrieval and Evaluation (ADmIRE)

Goal: Information Retrieval on the World Wide Web functions very effectively and efficiently. These search tools are specifically designed as multi-purpose tools, applicable in as wide an array of situations as possible. Nevertheless, all information is not equal. There are areas for which these tools are conceived too broadly to be useful: health or biomedical information, intellectual property information, social science publications, blogs, press photographs, etc. A search in one of these domains is called a domain-specific search. Such a search is specific in terms of the collection of documents indexed, search refinements arising from the domain characteristics, domain coverage specificity, types of multimodal data (e.g. images, chemical formulae) present in the documents, and the end users and their tasks.

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Aldo Lipani
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The empirical nature of Information Retrieval (IR) mandates strong experimental practices. The Cranfield/TREC evaluation paradigm represents a keystone of such experimental practices. Within this paradigm, the generation of relevance judgments has been the subject of intense scientific investigation. This is because, on one hand, consistent, precise and numerous judgements are key to reduce evaluation uncertainty and test collection bias; on the other hand, however , relevance judgements are costly to collect. The selection of which documents to judge for relevance (known as pooling) has therefore great impact in IR evaluation. In this paper, we contribute a set of 8 novel pooling strategies based on retrieval fusion methods. We show that the choice of the pooling strategy has significant effects on the cost needed to obtain an unbiased test collection; we also identify the best performing pooling strategy according to three evaluation measure.
Aldo Lipani
added a project goal
Information Retrieval on the World Wide Web functions very effectively and efficiently. These search tools are specifically designed as multi-purpose tools, applicable in as wide an array of situations as possible. Nevertheless, all information is not equal. There are areas for which these tools are conceived too broadly to be useful: health or biomedical information, intellectual property information, social science publications, blogs, press photographs, etc. A search in one of these domains is called a domain-specific search. Such a search is specific in terms of the collection of documents indexed, search refinements arising from the domain characteristics, domain coverage specificity, types of multimodal data (e.g. images, chemical formulae) present in the documents, and the end users and their tasks.