Project

Abnormal Psychology: Contrasting Perspectives on Mental Distress (2nd ed.)

Goal: The goal of this textbook is to present abnormal psychology as a discipline in which there are many competing perspectives. My objective is to present these different perspectives fairly and thoroughly. Students should come away with a clear sense of these perspectives, as well as their theoretical presumptions, research evidence, and treatment strategies.

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Project log

Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
I just submitted Batch 2 (Chapters 5-8) to my development editor. Finished polishing Batch 1 yesterday. Turning to Batch 3's Chapter 9 next.
Progress!
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
I am celebrating receipt of Batch 1 reviews of the second edition from my development editor Emily. The feedback was overwhelmingly positive, and the constructive feedback was useful. It will help me make edits to improve the first four chapters.
Hope you’re enjoying the Memorial Day weekend. I’m taking the weekend off, then it’s back to Batch 2!
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
I have just signed a contract with Bloomsbury (which purchased Red Globe) to do a second edition of “Abnormal Psychology: Contrasting Perspectives.”
Revisions are already underway, with the first batch of updated chapters already submitted to my development editor.
Follow the project on Research Gate, Facebook, and Twitter:
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
My textbook, Abnormal Psychology: Contrasting Perspectives, has been published by Red Globe Press/Macmillan International Higher Education. Because the book is now completed, I won't be posting any additional updates here for the time being. Instead, attention shifts to spreading word about the book and sharing it with students.
For those who wish to keep up with the book's journey, information about it (including how to adopt it for your classes) is available on the publisher's website:
There is also an Abnormal Psychology: Contrasting Perspectives Facebook page, which includes book updates and regular posts about current issues related to abnormal psychology:
I invite you to like and follow the page!
Thank you for all your support while I was completing this project. I hope you enjoy the end result.
Jon
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
Check out the preface to Abnormal Psychology: Contrasting Perspectives. It offers a nice overview of how the book is structured and the resources provided to faculty and students.
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
If you are teaching abnormal psychology or a related class at the undergraduate or graduate level and are interested in receiving an examination copy of Abnormal Psychology: Contrasting Perspectives, you can do so by requesting one on the publisher's website:
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
Abnormal Psychology: Contrasting Perspectives is now IN PRESS. The final proofs were sent to the printer yesterday.
The book will officially release in the UK in the first week of October, with publication in the US by the end of October. The book should be available in the rest of the world in late October, as well.
If you are teaching a class for which you might adopt the book but haven't yet requested a review copy, you can do so on the publisher's website by clicking the "Request a sample" button: https://www.macmillanihe.com/page/detail/abnormal-psychology-jonathan-raskin/?sf1=barcode&st1=9781137547170.
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
Author Jonathan Raskin explains three things instructors will like about his textbook, "Abnormal Psychology: Contrasting Perspectives." https://youtu.be/i7N4ASF-j60
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
4th and final proof has arrived. Check out this excerpt on “The New View” approach to sexual complaints.
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
The table of contents conveys the broad array of diverse perspectives that the book covers. 
Book due due out in October!
Please feel free to share, especially with colleagues who teach undergrad or grad abnormal or psychopathology classes and might be interested in adopting the book. Anyone interested is welcome to get in touch with me.
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
Third set of page proofs arrived today. Off to the printer in early September.
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
Here's a photo of me presenting on ICD-11, RDoC, HiTOP, and the PTM Framework at the August 2018 American Psychological Convention in San Francisco.
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
Another video, this time on the way diagnostic perspective, such as DSM, ICD, RDoC, HiTOP, and PTM are incorporated into “Abnormal Psychology: Contrasting Perspectives.” https://youtu.be/v_VCI8snjqs
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
Check out the attached promotional flyer for Abnormal Psychology: Contrasting Perspectives. Please feel free to download it, post it, and disseminate it.
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
Check out this new video outlining what a perspectives approach is and how it is central to "Abnormal Psychology: Contrasting Perspectives."
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
In keeping with the focus on consumer and service-user perspectives that runs throughout the text, check out the attached proofs of the "Lived Experience" feature from Chapter 2 entitled "What Will Happen in My First Therapy Session?"
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added a research item
This groundbreaking core textbook offers a comprehensive overview of different perspectives on abnormal psychology. The book retains important diagnostic perspectives, including the DSM-5, ICD-10, ICD-11 and PDM, but also widens the scope of coverage beyond mainstream psychiatric models to include psychological, biological, historical, sociocultural and therapeutic approaches. Contemporary and well-balanced, this book provides an even-handed and holistic foundation, allowing students to develop a strong critical mindset while retaining a robust research-driven orientation. Read more online at http://www.macmillanihe.com/t/9781137547170/ Ebook 9781137547170 $59.99 Paperback 9781137547163 $67.99
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
Check out (and like) the new “Abnormal Psychology: Contrasting Perspectives“ Facebook page:
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
I received the first round of page proofs this week. Will read through them and get them back to the publisher with corrections by mid-June.
Have also been been working on supplementary materials. Dr. Caroline Stanley, a psychology professor at Bridgewater State University who teaches abnormal psychology at the undergraduate and graduate levels, is working with me to develop a test bank and online self-tests for each chapter. Lecture notes and PowerPoint slides for insteuctors are also being generated, while an online portal with separate sections for students and instructors is also in the works. The student section will include not only include self-tests, but also will contain study guides, online flash cards, and an chapter glossaries.
Getting close to the the finish line!
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
The book is now at the copyediting stage. Who knew how much attention to detail goes into making sure all the references, definitions, and formatting are correct? After copyediting, it's page proofs and then publication in October.
If you're interested in adopting the book for Spring 2019 or Fall 2019, please contact me to let me know.
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
It's official! Macmillan International Higher Education has moved Abnormal Psychology: Contrasting Perspectives from development to production. Estimated publication date: October or November 2018. If you are teaching abnormal psychology or a related course at the undergraduate or graduate level and want to know more, feel free to contact me.
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
Who'd have thought writing photo captions was so challenging? Here's one photo for the chapter on "Diagnosis, Formulation, and Assessment" that I need to write a caption for.
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
Now that the final draft of the full manuscript has been sent to Palgrave, next begins the process of selecting photos to use in the book, along with securing necessary permissions for images, tables, excerpts, and other materials used.
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
I sent my final draft of "Abnormal Psychology: Contrasting Perspectives" to the publisher today! Below is the abridged table of contents. Looking forward to the book going into production.
ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY: CONTRASTING PERSPECTIVES
Jonathan D. Raskin
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Preface
1. Conceptual, Historical, and Research Perspectives
2. Theoretical Perspectives
3. Diagnosis, Formulation, and Assessment
4. Psychosis
5. Mood Problems
6. Anxiety, Obsessions, and Compulsions
7. Trauma, Stress, and Loss
8. Dissociation and Somatic Complaints
9. Feeding and Eating Problems
10. Sexual Problems and Gender Issues
11. Substance Use and Addiction
12. Personality Issues
13. Developmental Issues Involving Disruptive Behavior and Attachment
14. Other Presenting Problems
15. Suicide, Ethics, and Law
Glossary
References
Name Index
Subject Index
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
I've revised Chapters 1-11 and am now starting work on revising Chapter 12. One of the book's features provides in depth glimpses of important issues covered in most abnormal psych classes. Here's a first peek at the "in depth" feature from Chapter 10, which examines the long tortured history of homosexuality in the DSM.
IN DEPTH: VOTING HOMOSEXUALITY OUT OF THE DSM
Homosexuality was listed as a mental disorder in DSM-I (1952) and DSM-II (1968). During this time, it was common for clinicians to engage in conversion therapy (also known as reparative therapy), which involved trying to turn homosexuals into heterosexuals (Socarides, 1978/1989). However, as social attitudes about homosexuality became more tolerant during the 1960s and 70s, many people began questioning whether homosexuality should be considered a disorder. During the revision process for DSM-III in the early 1970s, those who wanted homosexuality declassified as a mental disorder began protesting at American Psychiatric Association (APA) conventions (Drescher, 2015a; Kirk & Kutchins, 1992). This produced one of the most controversial events in DSM history: the supposed “voting out” of homosexuality from the DSM.
What exactly happened? Many members of the DSM-III revision task force—including its leader, psychiatrist Robert Spitzer, concluded that if homosexuality didn’t cause a person subjective distress, it made no sense to consider it a mental disorder. Various APA committees concurred with Spitzer’s determination and in December 1973 the APA’s Board of Trustees voted to remove homosexuality from the DSM (Drescher, 2015a; Kirk & Kutchins, 1992). Psychiatrists opposing this decision petitioned to have the entire membership of the APA vote on whether or not they agreed with the Board of Trustees. Half of the APA’s 20,000 members voted, with 58% of them supporting the Board (Drescher, 2015a). Thus, homosexuality was officially removed from the DSM.
Critics often point to this vote as evidence that deciding what is a mental disorder is based on politics, not science (Kirk & Kutchins, 1992). After all, would we ever consider voting illnesses like diabetes or cancer out of existence? If a disorder is real, these critics claim, then voting cannot change that fact. However, others counter that this is an unfair assessment (Drescher, 2015a; Zachar & Kendler, 2012). They note that in all scientific endeavors, human decisions about how to define and classify certain things must be made. For instance, as astronomers’ definition of what constitutes a planet changed, they ultimately resorted to voting on Pluto’s status as a planet (and, to some people’s dismay, decided it isn’t one) (Zachar & Kendler, 2012). Defenders of the DSM say the vote on homosexuality was no different from the vote on Pluto; science often involves social consensus—and the evolving consensus among mental health professions was that homosexuals not distressed about their sexuality shouldn’t be deemed ill.
But the issue didn’t end there. The DSM-III (1980) removed homosexuality, but included a new diagnosis called ego-dystonic homosexuality for people who were gay and psychologically upset about it (Drescher, 2015a). Critics saw this as backsliding and a way to pacify those who wished to continue diagnosing and treating homosexuality. Why, argued these critics, was there an ego-dystonic homosexuality category but not an ego-dystonic heterosexuality diagnosis? Couldn’t one be straight and conflicted about it, too? Based on these criticisms, ego-dystonic homosexuality wasn’t included in DSM-III-R (1987), DSM-IV (1994), or DSM-IV-TR (2000). However, these manuals did note that distress over sexual orientation could continue to be diagnosed using the sexual disorder not otherwise specified (SDNOS) category (Drescher, 2015a). Critics continued to object. They argued that persistent distress about being gay or lesbian is better attributed to social disapproval than mental disorder. At last, with the publication of DSM-5 in 2013, homosexuality was—for the first time—wholly removed from the manual (Drescher, 2015a).
Most of the controversy about homosexuality as a mental disorder has focused on the DSM. Yet it’s worth noting that the ICD has generally followed in the DSM’s footsteps. Homosexuality was listed as a mental disorder from ICD-6 (1948) through ICD-9 (1975) (Drescher, 2015a). ICD-10 echoed the DSM-III’s ego-dystonic homosexuality by including a category called ego-dystonic sexual orientation, but the new ICD-11—like the DSM-5—excludes homosexuality entirely (Drescher, 2015a). Reflecting the DSM and ICD shifts away from classifying homosexuality as a disorder, professional organizations in many countries today consider conversion therapy ineffective and unethical (American Psychiatric Association, 2000; Anton, 2010; British Psychological Society, 2014, 2017; Canadian Psychological Association, n.d.; "Memorandum of understanding on conversion therapy in the UK," 2015; Veltman & Chaimowitz, 2014). Some countries—notably Malta and Taiwan—have even moved to ban it entirely (Lambert, 2017; Stack, 2016). However, the repudiation of homosexuality as mental disorder is not universal. In 2016, the Indonesian Psychiatrists Association (PDSKJI), despite objections from other professional organizations inside and outside of Indonesia (Lamb, 2017; S. Levin, 2016), identified homosexuality as a mental disorder and indicated that it can be cured with proper treatment (Yosephine, 2016). Thus, in certain parts of the world homosexuality remains pathologized.
Critical Thinking Questions
1. What do you think of the argument that removing homosexuality from the DSM was influenced more by politics than science? Explain your answer.
2. When it comes to deciding whether something is a disorder, what is the exact relationship between science and politics? Can political considerations ever be taken out of the equation?
3. Most mental health professional organizations prohibit the use of conversion therapy. What would you, as a psychotherapist, say to a client who came to see you seeking conversion therapy?
4. What do you make of the fact that while many countries have been moving away from seeing homosexuality as a disorder and conversion therapy as an ethical treatment, Indonesia recently declared homosexuality a treatable mental disorder?
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
Revisions complete on Chapters 1-6. Aiming to get all revised chapters to the publisher by September.
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
All 15 chapters drafted. Now working to revise them and get them into final form. The book is scheduled to appear in 2018.
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
Finishing draft of the 15th and final chapter. Then it's time to do some revisions on all chapters and get the full manuscript to the publisher!
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
Check out this except from Chapter 1.
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added an update
Draft of cover design in attached file!
 
Jonathan D. Raskin
added a project goal
The goal of this textbook is to present abnormal psychology as a discipline in which there are many competing perspectives. My objective is to present these different perspectives fairly and thoroughly. Students should come away with a clear sense of these perspectives, as well as their theoretical presumptions, research evidence, and treatment strategies.