Project

ARCH: Advancing Resilience of Historic Areas Against Climate-related and Other Hazards

Goal: ARCH is a European-funded research project that aims to better preserve areas of cultural heritage from hazards and risks. The ARCH team with the cities of Bratislava, Camerino, Hamburg and Valencia will co-create tools that will help cities save cultural heritage from the effects of climate change.

The impacts of climate change are global in scope and unprecedented in scale. Cities will face frequent extreme events in future and the risk to cultural heritage and historic urban centres from climate change will also increase.

ARCH will develop a disaster risk management framework for assessing and improving the resilience of historic areas to climate change and natural hazards. Tools and methodologies will be designed for local authorities and practitioners, the urban population, and national and international expert communities. The project will present various models, methods, tools and datasets to support decision-making.ARCH‘s expert interdisciplinary team includes four European municipalities; Bratislava, Camerino, Hamburg, and Valencia; research scientists, city network ICLEI and standardisation organisation DIN.

This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement N°820999.

More information: https://www.savingculturalheritage.eu/

Methods: Remote Sensing, Climate Change Adaptation, Disaster Risk Reduction, Multispectral Imaging, Co-creation, Hydraulic Modelling, Stakeholder Engagement, Probabilistic Risk Analysis, SAR Interferometry, Community Resilience, Urban Resilience, 3D Visualization, Decision Support Systems, UAV, Building Information Modelling, BIM, Laser Scanning, Lidar Remote Sensing, Geographical Information System, Simulation Modeling

Date: 1 June 2019 - 31 May 2022

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Project log

Daniel Lückerath
added a research item
The EU-H2020 project ARCH aims to develop and adapt tools and methods for assessing and improving the resilience of historic areas to climate-related and other natural hazards [1]. One of these tools is CIPCast, a scenario simulation and decision support system for the analysis and forecast of risks and vulnerabilities of critical infrastructure components and their interdependencies. In this paper, we describe the basic functionalities of CIPCast, as far as the application to seismic risk assessment is concerned and we provide an overview of the models behind it. Furthermore, a brief discussion on how we plan to extend CIPCast to model and simulate potential risks and impacts induced by climate change to historic areas, and how this is intended to support resilience assessment strategies, is provided in the conclusions .
Daniel Lückerath
added a research item
Consequences of climate change, like more frequent extreme weather events, are major challenges for urban areas. With diverse approaches for adaptation strategy development available to cities, comparability with respect to risks, vulnerabilities, and adaptation options is limited. The lack of standardized methods and approaches to prioritize and select appropriate adaptation options restricts the exchange of best practices between cities.
Oliver Ullrich
added a project goal
ARCH is a European-funded research project that aims to better preserve areas of cultural heritage from hazards and risks. The ARCH team with the cities of Bratislava, Camerino, Hamburg and Valencia will co-create tools that will help cities save cultural heritage from the effects of climate change.
The impacts of climate change are global in scope and unprecedented in scale. Cities will face frequent extreme events in future and the risk to cultural heritage and historic urban centres from climate change will also increase.
ARCH will develop a disaster risk management framework for assessing and improving the resilience of historic areas to climate change and natural hazards. Tools and methodologies will be designed for local authorities and practitioners, the urban population, and national and international expert communities. The project will present various models, methods, tools and datasets to support decision-making.ARCH‘s expert interdisciplinary team includes four European municipalities; Bratislava, Camerino, Hamburg, and Valencia; research scientists, city network ICLEI and standardisation organisation DIN.
This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement N°820999.