Project

A clinical trial of theta burst stimulation (TBS) to enhance social relating in autism spectrum disorder

Goal: This clinical trial investigates whether a form of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), theta burst stimulation (TBS), can produce clinical improvements in 14-30 year-olds with autism spectrum disorder. We will compare stimulation at two candidate sites: right temporoparietal junction (rTPJ) and bilateral dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. This work is funded through a NARSAD Independent Investigator Award from the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation.

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Project log

Peter Enticott
added an update
The trial is currently active and we have enrolled our first participants. Theta burst stimulation (TMS) treatments are being conducted at the Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre (MAPrc; St Kilda Rd, Melbourne, Australia). Two participants have completed a full treatment cycle (4 weeks), with a third currently underway. To date the TMS treatments have been well tolerated.
If you would like further information about the study, please contact either PI Dr. Peter Enticott (peter.enticott@deakin.edu.au) or Study Coordinator Dr. Peter Donaldson (peter.donaldson@deakin.edu.au).
Further trial information can be found here: https://goo.gl/o26AVW
 
Peter Enticott
added an update
This study is now recruiting participants. Enquiries to peter.donaldson@deakin.edu.au .
 
Peter Enticott
added an update
This study is due to begin recruitment in March, 2017. It is registered on the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR): https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=372005&isReview=true
 
Peter Enticott
added a project goal
This clinical trial investigates whether a form of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), theta burst stimulation (TBS), can produce clinical improvements in 14-30 year-olds with autism spectrum disorder. We will compare stimulation at two candidate sites: right temporoparietal junction (rTPJ) and bilateral dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. This work is funded through a NARSAD Independent Investigator Award from the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation.