(Elizabeth) Qing Zhang

(Elizabeth) Qing Zhang
Nicolaus Copernicus University | umk · centre for language evolution studies

Doctor of Philosophy

About

8
Publications
499
Reads
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17
Citations
Citations since 2016
7 Research Items
17 Citations
201620172018201920202021202202468
201620172018201920202021202202468
201620172018201920202021202202468
201620172018201920202021202202468
Introduction
My current research focuses on how domain-general cognitive abilities contribute to the development and evolution of human language. What interests me the most is the role vocal learning ability plays in multimodal language development and evolution. I am also interested in the relationship between music and language in terms of evolution. I have mainly been doing theoretical research on the biological perspective of language evolution and development.
Additional affiliations
September 2018 - August 2021
Sun Yat-Sen University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
February 2014 - September 2017
University of Barcelona
Field of study
  • cognitive science and language

Publications

Publications (8)
Article
By focusing on the contributions of subcortical structures, our commentary suggests that the functions of the hippocampus underlying “displacement,” a feature enabling humans to communicate things and situations that are remote in space and time, make language more effective at social bonding. Based on the functions of the basal ganglia and hippoca...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
By re-evaluating Crow (2000)'s claim that "Schizophrenia [is] the price that Homo sapiens pays for language", we suggest that displacement, the ability to refer to things and situations outside from here and now, partly realized through syntactic operation, could be related to the symptoms of schizophrenia. Mainly supported by episodic memory, disp...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper reviews the existing literature on categorical perception of sounds and colors in different animals including humans. We highlight that categorical perception is a combination of nature and nurture; to be specific, categorical perception is innate with a phylogenetic root, but it can also be modified by postnatal experience. We also sugg...
Article
Introduction Classical attempts to capture the nature of aphasia have been “corticocentric” in identifying language processes. Recent conceptual and technical advances force us to reconsider the neural bases of language. In this work we aim to review several studies of damaged subcortical structures (thalamus and basal ganglia) that show large effe...

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