Zsolt Ronai

Zsolt Ronai
Semmelweis University | SOTE · Department of Medical Chemistry, Molecular Biology and Pathobiochemistry

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109
Publications
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Publications

Publications (109)
Article
Full-text available
Glucocorticoids play a central role in the inflammatory response and alleviate the symptoms in critically ill patients. The glucocorticoid action relies on the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) which translocates into the nucleus upon ligand-binding and regulates transcription of a battery of genes. Although the GR is encoded by a single gene, dozens of...
Article
Schizotypy refers to a set of heritable, continuously distributed personality traits that resemble signs and symptoms of schizophrenia in the general population. It has been argued that studying the genetic background of schizotypy may yield valuable information about the etiology of schizophrenia. This study examined the association between select...
Article
Full-text available
Several lines of epidemiological and biochemical evidence support the association of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and colorectal cancer (CRC). T2DM has been shown to impinge on the transcriptome of colon tumor cells, promoting their proliferation and invasion. In order to gain insight into diabetes-specific modulation of colon cancer signaling,...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Although the molecular function of wolframin remains unclear, the lack of this protein is known to cause stress in the endoplasmic reticulum. Some variants in the Wolfram Syndrome 1 gene (WFS1) were associated with various neuropsychiatric disorders in humans, such as aggressiveness, impulsivity and anxiety. Results: Here we present...
Article
Background Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and colorectal cancer (CRC) are both known to modulate gene expression patterns in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs). Objective As T2DM has been shown to increase the incidence of CRC, we were prompted to check whether diabetes affects mRNA signatures in PBLs isolated from CRC patients. Methods 22 patients were...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Although the molecular function of wolframin remains unclear, the lack of this protein is known to cause stress in the endoplasmic reticulum. Some variants in the Wolfram Syndrome 1 gene (WFS1) were associated with various neuropsychiatric disorders in humans, such as aggressiveness, impulsivity and anxiety. Results Here we present an i...
Article
Full-text available
Background Galanin, an inhibitory neuropeptide and cotransmitter has long been known to co-localize with noradrenaline and serotonin in the central nervous system. Several human studies demonstrated altered galanin expression levels in major depressive disorder and anxiety. Pharmacological modulation of galanin signaling and transgenic strategies p...
Article
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Background A number of human inflammatory diseases and tumors have been shown to cause alterations in the glycosylation pattern of plasma proteins in a specific manner. This highly variable and versatile post-translational modifications fine-tunes protein functions by influencing sorting, folding, enzyme activity and subcellular localization. Howev...
Article
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Introduction and aim: Earlier results in the literature suggest that overweight subjects show weaker performance in executive function tasks as compared to normal weight people. Dopaminergic system is strongly linked to executive functions, body mass regulation and ingestion. The aim of the present study was to examine the possible relationship bet...
Article
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Although the Human Genome Project discovered the sequence of the human genetic information 15 years ago, genetic background of the diseases - primarily that of complex disorders - is still not known. The sum of the not yet discovered inherited risk factors is termed the missing heritability; the identification of these genetic components is, howeve...
Article
Full-text available
Variations in human infants' attachment behavior are associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene, suggesting a genetic component to infant-mother attachment. However, due to the genetic relatedness of infants and their mothers, it is difficult to separate the genetic effects of infants' OXTR genotype...
Article
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Recent studies suggest that the relationship between endogenous oxytocin and social affiliative behavior can be critically moderated by contextual and individual factors in humans. While oxytocin has been shown to influence human-directed affiliative behaviors in dogs, no study investigated yet how such factors moderate these effects. Our study aim...
Article
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Meeting humans is an everyday experience for most companion dogs, and their behavior in these situations and its genetic background is of major interest. Previous research in our laboratory reported that in German shepherd dogs the lack of G allele, and in Border collies the lack of A allele, of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) 19208A/G single nuc...
Article
Full-text available
Oxytocin is a key modulator of emotional processing and social cognitive function. In line with this, polymorphisms of genes involved in oxytocin signaling, like the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene, are known to influence social behavior in various species. However, to date, no study has investigated environmental factors possibly influencing the epi...
Article
Full-text available
Oxytocin receptor (OXTR) acts as a key behavioral modulator of the central nervous system, affecting social behavior, stress, affiliation and cognitive functions. Variants of the Oxtr gene are known to influence behavior both in animals and humans, however, canine Oxtr polymorphisms are less characterized in terms of possible relevance to function,...
Article
Full-text available
Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes development and differentiation of dopaminergic neurons, thus it has an important role in dopamine-related neuropsychiatric disorders. Since the role of dopamine system in smoking is well established, we hypothesized that GDNF gene variants may affect smoking behaviour. Self-reported data...
Article
The WFS1 gene is one of the thoroughly investigated targets in diabetes research, variants of the gene were suggested to be the genetic components of the common forms (type 1 and type 2) of diabetes. Our project focused on the analysis of polymorphisms (rs4689388, rs148797429, rs4273545) localized in the WFS1 promoter region. Although submarine gel...
Article
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The absolute or relative lack of insulin is the key factor in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. Although the connection between loss of function mutations of the WFS1 gene and DIDMOAD-syndrome including diabetes mellitus underpins the significance of wolframin in the pathogenesis, exact role of WFS1 polymorphic variants in the development of t...
Poster
Background Possible role of DNA methylation of genes concerned with neurobiological processes have long been implicated in behavioral variance, however, investigation of the role of epigenetic regulation in cognitive and temperamental characteristics is exceptionally challenging due to several factors such as (1) contribution of multiple genes with...
Poster
Oxytocin receptor (OXTR) is a key modulator of social behavior, affiliation and cognitive functions, as highlighted by animal studies. Polymorphisms of the OXTR gene are known to be related to behavioral traits both in humans and other mammals, however, little is known about the effect of epigenetic variations. In the present study, we use the dome...
Article
Full-text available
Cardiac death remains one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. Recent research has shed light on pathophysiological mechanisms underlying cardiac death, and several genetic variants in novel candidate genes have been identified as risk factors. However, the vast majority of studies performed so far investigated genetic associations with sp...
Poster
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Introduction: Diabetes mellitus has become one of the most significant health problems worldwide. It is known that the disease is a complex phenotype, being determined by both environmental and genetic factors as well as by their interactions. The purpose of this research project was to investigate, if certain genetic factors can be considered as r...
Poster
Full-text available
Oxytocin receptor (OXTR) is a key modulator of social behavior, affiliation and cognitive functions, as highlighted by animal studies. Polymorphisms of the OXTR gene are known to be related to behavioral traits both in humans and other mammals, however, little is known about the effect of epigenetic variations. In the present study, we use the dome...
Article
Full-text available
Aggressive manifestations and their consequences are a major issue of mankind, highlighting the need for understanding the contributory factors. Still, aggression-related genetic analyses have so far mainly been conducted on small population subsets such as individuals suffering from a certain psychiatric disorder or a narrow-range age cohort, but...
Article
Despite of the fact that the Human Genome Project was completed more than a decade ago, identification of the genetic background of polygenic diseases is still challenging. Several somewhat different approaches are available to investigate inheritable factors of complex phenotypes, all require, however efficient, high-throughput techniques for SNP...
Poster
Oxytocin receptor (OXTR) plays a key role in social behavior, bonding and memory, as highlighted by animal studies. OXTR gene variations influence emotional reactions, such as anger and aggression, both in human and other mammals. Dogs show prominent similarities with young children in sensitivity to social stimuli and processing of emotions is als...
Poster
Full-text available
Introduction: The oxytocin system has a crucial role in human sociality; several results prove that polymorphisms of the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene are related to complex social behaviors in humans. Dogs’ parallel evolution with humans and their adaptation to the human environment has made them a useful species to model human social interactions...
Conference Paper
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Effects of ownership styles on epigenetic modifications of OXTR gene in dogs (Canis familiaris) Cimarelli, Giulia1; Turcsán, Borbála2; Range, Friederike1; Bánlaki, Zsófia3; Rónai, Zsolt3; Virányi, Zsófia1 1Messerli Research Institute & Wolf Science Center, Vienna, AUT; 2Clever Dog Lab, Messerli Research Institute, Vienna, AUT; 3Department of Medica...
Poster
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Zsofia Banlaki1, Giulia Cimarelli2,3, Zsofia Viranyi2,3, Jozsef Topal 5, Dora Koller1,4, Maria Sasvari-Szekely1, Zsolt Ronai1 1Semmelweis University, Department of Medical Chemistry, Molecular Biology and Pathobiochemistry; Budapest, Hungary 2Wolf Science Center; Ernstbrunn, Austria 3Messerli Research Institute, University of Veterinary Medicine Vi...
Article
The glycogen synthase kinase 3B (GSK3B) is an important target protein of several antidepressants, such as lithium, a mood stabilizer. Recent studies associated structural variations of the GSK3B gene to bipolar disorder (BP), although replications were not conclusive. Here we present data on copy number variations (CNVs) of the GSK3B gene probing...
Article
The 25 kDa Synaptosomal-associated protein (SNAP-25) is a crucial component of the Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor Attachment Protein Receptor (SNARE) complex and plays an important role in neurotransmission in the central nervous system. SNAP-25 has two different splice variants, SNAP-25a and SNAP-25b, differing in 9 amino acids that res...
Article
Full-text available
The oxytocin system has a crucial role in human sociality; several results prove that polymorphisms of the oxytocin receptor gene are related to complex social behaviors in humans. Dogs' parallel evolution with humans and their adaptation to the human environment has made them a useful species to model human social interactions. Previous research i...
Article
Full-text available
Impulsivity is a personality trait of high impact and is connected with several types of maladaptive behavior and psychiatric diseases, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, alcohol and drug abuse, as well as pathological gambling and mood disorders. Polymorphic variants of the SNAP-25 gene emerged as putative genetic components of impu...
Article
Full-text available
Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a neurotrophic factor for dopaminergic neurons with promising therapeutic potential in Parkinson's disease. A few association analyses between GDNF gene polymorphisms and psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and drug abuse have also been published...
Article
Full-text available
Rare mutations in the WFS1 gene lead to Wolfram syndrome, a severe multisystem disorder with progressive neurodegeneration and diabetes mellitus causing life-threatening complications and premature death. Only a few association studies using small clinical samples tested the possible effects of common WFS1 gene variants on mood disorders and suicid...
Article
Both dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) exon 3 and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) intron 4 repeat polymorphisms have been linked to activity and impulsivity in German Shepherd dogs (GSDs). However, the results in GSDs may not be generalisable to other breeds, as allelic frequencies vary markedly among breeds. We selected the Siberian Husky for further study, b...
Data
Disorganized attachment is an early predictor of the development of psychopathology in childhood and adolescence. Lyons-Ruth et al. (1999) developed the AMBIANCE coding scheme to assess disrupted communication between mother and infant, and reported the link between maternal behavior and disorganized attachment. The Hungarian group found an associa...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated the association between repeat polymorphism in intron 4 of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene and two personality traits, activity-impulsivity and inattention, in German Shepherd Dogs. The behaviour of 104 dogs was characterized by two instruments: (1) the previously validated Dog-Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Rating Scal...
Article
Full-text available
There is an ongoing extensive study on the polymorphisms of the oxytocine receptor (OXTR) gene and their relation to certain psychological traits and psychiatric disorders, however the results are contradictory. One of the sources of inconsistency could originate from the fact that the OXTR gene contains more than 270 SNPs (single nucleotide polymo...
Article
Full-text available
Synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25) plays a crucial role in exocitosis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs3746544 and rs1051312) in the 3' un-translated region of the SNAP-25 gene have been described to be in association with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. As the disease affects millions of children world-wide, understanding th...
Article
Full-text available
Previous studies implicate involvement of dopaminergic systems in hypnotizability and report association with the COMT Val(158)Met single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, rs4680) demonstrating the Val/Met heterozygotes as the most hypnotizable group using the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale. This study replicates that association using an indep...
Article
Full-text available
Human trypsinogens are post-translationally sulfated on Tyr154 by the Golgi resident enzyme tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase-2 (TPST2). Tyrosine sulfation stimulates the autoactivation of human cationic trypsinogen. Because increased trypsinogen autoactivation has been implicated as a pathogenic mechanism in chronic pancreatitis, we hypothesized tha...