Zsolt Palatinus

Zsolt Palatinus
University of Szeged · Department of Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience

PhD

About

16
Publications
5,967
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185
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2017 - present
University of Szeged
Position
  • Professor
August 2015 - June 2016
University of the Pacific
Position
  • Research Assistant
August 2014 - May 2015
University of Southern Mississippi
Position
  • Professor

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
Full-text available
The goal of the present study is to examine the cognitive/affective physiological correlates of passenger travel experience in autonomously driven transportation systems. We investigated the social acceptance and cognitive aspects of self-driving technology by measuring physiological responses in real-world experimental settings using eye-tracking...
Article
There is a broad international research interest in the study of consumer acceptance of self-driving technology. Most researchers use questionnaires based on different versions of TAM and UTAUT models to investigate this topic. However, the vast majority of respondents fill out the questionnaires, without any first-hand experience of self-driving t...
Article
Development of autonomous vehicles (AVs) is growing in a rapid rate, however, the most dominant barriers in their adoption seem to be rather psychological than technical. The present online survey study aimed to investigate which demographical and personality dimensions predict attitudes towards AVs on a Hungarian sample (N = 328). We demonstrated...
Preprint
Full-text available
The goal of the present study is to examine the cognitive/physiological correlates of passenger travel experience in autonomously driven transportation systems. We investigated the social acceptance and cognitive aspects of self-driving technology by measuring physiological responses in real-world experimental settings using eye-tracking and EEG me...
Article
Reductionist viewpoints have been increasingly replaced by complex systems viewpoints in biological theory and methodology since the turn of the millennium. This tendency has also been reflected in thinking about evolution. Just as the defining evolutionary synthesis of the 20th century - the Modern Synthesis - was born out of the integration of th...
Article
Full-text available
In this theoretical review article, our primary goal is to contribute to the post-cognitivist understanding of learning to perceive and perceiving as learning, by discussing a framework for perception and perceptual learning initiated by James J Gibson, and extended by Eleanor J Gibson and others. This Ecological Psychology has a coherent set of as...
Poster
Full-text available
The environment is perceived in terms of potential actions called affordances (Gibson, 1979). Perception of affordances is determined by (1) sensory information and (2) behavioral capability. Surface patterns and body posture can reveal whether a person could stand on a sloped ramp or not. Bodily movements are naturally variable. It is hard to see...
Poster
Full-text available
Recent research (Hajnal, Wagman, Bunch, & Doyon, 2014) suggested that geographic slants feel steeper than they look. Visual perception of the stand-on-able-ness of an inclined surface is generally accurate and corresponds to an action boundary of approximately 30 degrees. Haptic perception underestimates the action boundary in laboratory settings....
Article
Full-text available
Research on dynamic touching of a rod attached at its center point to the shoulders (1st vertebra) has shown that with voluntary wielding—by means of axial rotations, flexions-extensions, and lateral bending of the trunk—participants can selectively perceive the whole rod length and a partial rod length (e.g., leftward segment) with comparable prec...
Chapter
Full-text available
The ecological approach to perception and action evolved in the 1950s and 1960s, and major principles had been outlined by the time of the publication of J. J. Gibson’s The Senses Considered as Perceptual Systems in 1966: ecological optics, invariants, exploration, direct perception, affordances, the education of attention, and the intimacies of pe...
Article
Full-text available
This dissertation investigates the potential contribution of fractal fluctuations of head sway in the time evolution of visual recognition in biological motion perception. The first experiment found no difference in recognition times when point light display (PLD) activities are shown either from a fixed or a moving point of observation. The second...
Article
Full-text available
Movement science has traditionally understood high-dimensional fluctuations as either antithetical or irrelevant to low-dimensional control. However, fluctuations incident to changeful, sometimes unpredictable stimulation must somehow reshape low-dimensional aspects of control through perception. The movement system's fluctuations may reflect casca...
Article
Full-text available
Most efforts for understanding biological movement perception seem to agree in assuming a key role of some version of 2D projective geometry being the basis of either computation or invariant detection somewhere between the stimulus and perception. Recent studies invite considering alternatives. Beintemma and Lappe (2002 PNAS 99 5661–5663) construc...
Article
Full-text available
The haptic subsystem of dynamic touch expresses a novel form of part-whole selective perception. When wielding a nonvisible rod grasped at some intermediate point along its length, an individual can attend to and report the length of a part of the rod (e.g., the segment forward of the hand) or the length of the whole rod. Both perceptions relate to...
Article
we propose a way to achieve across-population sharing within the authors' model in a way that is plausibly in accordance with human evolution, and also a simple way to capture ecological structure. finally, we briefly reflect on the model's scope and limits in modeling linguistic communication.

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