Zoltán Tóth

Zoltán Tóth
Department of Zoology, Plant Protection Institute, Centre for Agricultural Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences

PhD

About

46
Publications
13,541
Reads
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605
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2018 - present
Department of Zoology, Plant Protection Institute, Centre for Agricultural Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences
Position
  • Senior Researcher
January 2015 - August 2018
Lendület Evolutionary Ecology Research Group, Plant Protection Institute, Centre for Agricultural Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences
Position
  • Senior Researcher
September 2012 - December 2014
Lendület Evolutionary Ecology Research Group, Plant Protection Institute, Centre for Agricultural Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences
Position
  • Fellow
Education
September 2005 - August 2008
University of Pannonia, Veszprém
Field of study
  • Behavioural ecology
September 1999 - August 2004
University of Pécs
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (46)
Article
Full-text available
Due to recent changes in regulation, acetamiprid has become the only neonicotinoid that can be applied without restrictions and in open field cultivations in the EU from 2021. We provide an overview of the current knowledge on the effects of this insecticide on bumblebees and assessed whether available empirical evidence supports the claim that ace...
Article
Full-text available
The utilization of social cues is usually considered an important adaptation to living in social groups, but recent evidence suggests that social information use may be more prevalent in the animal kingdom than previously thought. However, it is debated whether such information can efficiently diffuse in temporary aggregations of non-grouping indiv...
Article
Understanding the distribution of genetic variation is central for both population biology and conservation genetics. Genetic population structure can be primarily affected by the species’ dispersal ability, which is assumed to be limited in many amphibians. In this study, we estimated allelic differentiation metrics and FST indices to investigate...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding biotic interactions and abiotic forces that govern population regulation is crucial for predicting stability from both theoretical and applied perspectives. In recent years, social information has been proposed to profoundly affect the dynamics of populations and facilitate the coexistence of interacting species. However, we have limi...
Article
Full-text available
Recent findings indicate that the utilization of social information, produced inadvertently by other individuals through their spatial location and/or interaction with the environment, may be ubiquitous in the animal kingdom. If so, social information-mediated effects on population growth and interspecies interactions may be more prevalent than pre...
Article
1.Inducible defences are ubiquitous in the animal kingdom, but little is known about facultative changes in chemical defences in response to predators, especially so in vertebrates. 2.We tested for predator‐induced changes in toxin production of larval common toads (Bufo bufo), which are known to synthesize bufadienolide compounds. 3.The experiment...
Article
Full-text available
Possessing toxins can contribute to an efficient defence against various threats in nature. However, we generally know little about the energy- and time-demands of developing toxicity in animals, which determines the efficiency of chemical defence and its trade-off with other risk-induced phenotypic responses. In this study we examined how immersio...
Article
In recent years, relatives (bastrovirus, hepelivirus) of hepeviruses (family Hepeviridae) have been reported in a variety of vertebrate hosts. Preliminary studies indicated that inter-viral family recombination events at the junction of the genomes that encodes non-structural (ORF1) and structural protein (ORF2) were implicated in the genesis of he...
Article
Full-text available
Predators influence the behaviour of prey and by doing so they potentially reduce pathogen transmission by a vector. Arthropod predators have been shown to reduce the consumption of plant biomass by pest herbivores, but their cascading non-consumptive effect on vector insects’ feeding behaviour and subsequent pathogen transmission has not been inve...
Article
Full-text available
Inducible behavioral defenses against predators, and how environmental factors mediate such responses, have been the focus of behavioral ecological research for decades. However, results often remained contradictory, perhaps because the ontogenetic context was ignored. Here, we investigated how antipredator behavioral responses of common toad (Bufo...
Article
Predator-induced plasticity has been in the focus of evolutionary ecological research in the last decades, but the consequences of temporal variation in the presence of cues predicting offspring environment have remained controversial. This is partly due to the fact that the role of early environmental effects has scarcely been scrutinized in this...
Article
Full-text available
Specialist and generalist predator mites have been recommended against the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranycus urticae) as biological control agents, but their effectiveness in population regulation has been rarely examined under circumstances when prey had the opportunity to express antipredatory responses. We tested the efficiency and preference...
Article
Full-text available
Predators can limit prey abundance and/or levels of activity. The magnitudes of these effects are contingent on predator and prey traits that may change with environmental conditions. Aberrant thermal regimes could disrupt pest suppression through asymmetric effects, e.g. heat-sensitive predator vs. heat-tolerant prey. To explore potential effects...
Article
Applying predatory mites as biological control agents is a well established method against spider mites which are major pests worldwide. Although antipredator responses can influence the outcome of predator-prey interactions, we have limited information about what cues spider mites use to adjust their behavioural antipredator responses. We experime...
Article
Full-text available
Insects find their oviposition sites using visual, contact and olfactory cues. Volatile stimuli emitted by an intact or herbivore-occupied host plant, non-host plants or the herbivore itself can all influence the final decision of females concerning where to lay eggs. Volatile substances surrounding larval excreted pellets, i.e., frass of the invas...
Article
Full-text available
Social foraging is thought to provide the possibility of information transmission between individuals, but this advantage has been proved only in a handful of species and contexts. We investigated how social connections in captive flocks of house sparrows (Passer domesticus) affected the discovery of (i.e. feeding for the first time from) two hidde...
Article
Full-text available
In this study, a novel picornavirus was identified in faecal samples from smooth newts (Lissotriton vulgaris). The complete genome of picornavirus strain newt/II-5-Pilis/2014/HUN (KX463670) is 7755 nt long with type-IV IRES and has 39.6% aa sequence identity in the protein P1 to the corresponding protein of bat picornavirus (KJ641686, unassigned) a...
Article
Full-text available
Antipredator responses often involve changes in several phenotypic traits and these changes interactively influence fitness. However, gaining insight into how the overall fitness effect of the overall response comes about is notoriously difficult. One promising avenue is to manipulate a single defensive trait and observe how that modifies fitness a...
Article
Full-text available
Defensive toxins are widespread in nature, yet we know little about how various environmental factors shape the evolution of chemical defense, especially in vertebrates. In this study we investigated the natural variation in the amount and composition of bufadienolide toxins, and the relative importance of ecological factors in predicting that vari...
Article
Full-text available
The European corn borer (ECB) is an important pest of maize in the northern hemisphere, but no reliable techniques exist for monitoring females during their reproductive period. In this study, we aimed to identify host-plant volatiles used by gravid Z-strain females in search for oviposition sites. Headspace of maize plants, to which gravid females...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research on predator-induced phenotypic plasticity mostly focused on responses in morphology, developmental time and/or behaviour during early life stages, but the potential significance of anticipatory parental responses has been investigated less often. In this study I examined behavioural and maternal responses of gravid female smooth n...
Technical Report
Full-text available
There is an error in Fig 3: The regression line in the published Fig 3 indicates a linear relationship between egg size and hatching success; however, a generalized linear mixed-effect model was used to analyze the relationship of these variables, which is not a linear one. Please see the correct Fig 3 here. Fig 3 Relationship between hatching su...
Article
Full-text available
Non-consumptive effects (NCEs) of predators are part of the complex interactions among insect natural enemies and prey. NCEs have been shown to significantly affect prey foraging and feeding. Leafhopper's (Auchenorrhyncha) lengthy phloem feeding bouts may play a role in pathogen transmission in vector species and also exposes them to predation risk...
Article
Full-text available
Chemical cues that evoke anti-predator developmental changes have received considerable attention, but it is not known to what extent prey use information from the smell of predators and from cues released through digestion. We conducted an experiment to determine the importance of various types of cues for the adjustment of anti-predator defences....
Article
Full-text available
Genetically highly divergent picornavirus (Newt/2013/HUN, KP770140) was detected using viral metagenomics in faecal samples of free-living smooth newts (Lissotriton vulgaris). Newt picornavirus was identified by RT-PCR in 6 (25%) of the 24 samples originating from individuals caught in two out of the six investigated natural ponds in Hungary. The f...
Article
Full-text available
Several studies have investigated how individuals’ social status or behavioural and physiological traits affect social organisation in group-living species, but the potential role of ornamental traits has been rarely studied. Here, we analysed initiator-follower interactions in relation to experimentally manipulated sexually selected ornaments in c...
Article
Full-text available
Phenotypic plasticity is extremely widespread in the behaviour, morphology and life-history of animals. However, inducible changes in the production of defensive chemicals are described mostly in plants and surprisingly little is known about similar plasticity in chemical defences of animals. Inducible chemical defences may be common in animals bec...
Article
Full-text available
Forming foraging groups may help to improve protection from predators, foraging efficiency and exchange of information, but to benefit from these advantages, animals need to maintain group cohesion. Several studies have investigated how social status or behavioural and physiological traits promote leadership and followership in various species, but...
Article
Full-text available
Urbanization creates novel environments for wild animals where selection pressures may differ drastically from those in natural habitats. Adaptation to urban life involves changes in various traits, including behavior. Behavioral traits often vary consistently among individuals, and these so-called personality traits can be correlated with each oth...
Article
Full-text available
Social network theory provides a perfect tool to better understand the population-level consequences of how individuals interact and make their decisions; however, this approach is generally overlooked among evolutionary biologists interested in social relationships. Here, we used social network analysis to examine the patterns of leader-follower i...
Article
Full-text available
In many species of the Salamandridae family, females provide parental care by carefully wrapping plant material around their eggs. As this behaviour has been shown to have a large effect on offspring survival, variation in this trait is expected to be low. Detailed investigations are, however, lacking. In the present study, we analyzed the consiste...
Article
Full-text available
Kin discrimination has often been investigated in the context of cannibalism, where differential treatment of kin may entail inclusive fitness benefits if closely related conspecifics are spared during foraging. Competition between related individuals can greatly modify the fitness benefits of such behaviour, but its effect has rarely been tested....
Article
Full-text available
Social behaviour of group-living animals is often influenced by the relatedness of individuals, thus understanding the genetic structure of groups is important for the interpretation of costs and benefits of social interactions. In this study, we investigated genetic relatedness in feeding aggregations of free-living house sparrows (Passer domestic...
Article
Full-text available
Non-aggressive social interactions between group-mates, e.g. maintenance of spatial proximity or activity synchrony are basic elements of a species' social structure, and were found to be associated with important fitness consequences in group-living animals. In the establishment of such affiliative relationships, kinship has often been identified...
Article
Full-text available
Kin-selection theory predicts that relatedness may reduce the level of aggression among competing group members, leading to indirect fitness benefits for kin-favoring individuals. To test this hypothesis, we investigated whether relatedness affects aggressive behavior during social activities in captive house sparrow (Passer domesticus) flocks. We...
Data
Number of alleles, allele sizes, and their estimated frequencies in the seven highly polymorphic microsatellite loci for 61 house sparrows in our study
Article
Full-text available
Kin selection is often important in the evolution of reproductive behaviour, but we know much less about its significance for nonreproductive social groups. We investigated whether relatedness affects social-foraging behaviour in captive house sparrow, Passer domesticus, flocks, where birds may either search for food or exploit flockmates' food fin...
Article
The mortality of barn owls breeding in nest boxes between 1995 and 2001 in Baranya county, southern Hungary was investigated using modified key factor analysis. Total mortality and the mortality rates of different stages of the breeding cycle were determined. The mortality rate between the autumn and breeding spring population size was applied as k...

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Recent findings (both theoretical and experimental) imply that the use of inadvertent social information (i.e. produced by conspecifics through their location, routine behaviour or interaction with the environment) may be taxonomically widespread, advantageous in various ecological settings, and, similarly to the utilization of other biotic or abiotic cues in the environment, not strongly associated with sociality or permanent group-living. I use several model systems to test relevant predictions in the context of foraging and predator avoidance, and estimate the effects of social diffusion in experimentally manipulated groups and temporary collectives.