Zoe Jewell

Zoe Jewell
SAS Institute and Duke University · Nicholas School of the Environment

26.45
 · 
M.A. M.Sc., Vet. M.B. (Cantab.)

About

48
Publications
13,732
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374
Citations
Introduction
I co-founded WildTrack (wildtrack.org) with Sky Alibhai, to develop and implement more effective, community-friendly and ethical methods of monitoring, amongst which is our footprint identification technique (FIT). We are Principal Research Associates at SAS, Adjunct Associate Professors at the Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University and Adjunct Professors at the Dept of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at North Carolina State University.
Research Experience
September 2012 - present
Duke University
Position
  • Visiting Research Scientist

Publications

Publications (48)
Preprint
Full-text available
This 'preprint' is an outreach to all those involved in managing, monitoring, and studying black rhino to better understand the disassociation of black rhino mothers and their small calves. It is a request for information from anyone who has observed/recorded such behaviour and an invitation to collaborate on studies that will hopefully elucidate t...
Presentation
Full-text available
WildTrack has developed a conservation monitoring tool, Footprint Identification Technique (FIT) that is accurate, non-invasive and cost-effective. Relying on the natural variation occurring in the footpad morphology of a species, FIT uses morphometrics from digital footprint images to enable identification by species, individual, sex and age-class...
Patent
Full-text available
The footprint identification technique
Article
Full-text available
Background As a landscape architect and a major seed disperser, the lowland tapir ( Tapirus terrestris ) is an important indicator of the ecological health of certain habitats. Therefore, reliable data regarding tapir populations are fundamental in understanding ecosystem dynamics, including those associated with the Atlantic Forest in Brazil. Curr...
Data
Dendrogram predicting the number of lowland tapirs (Tapirus terrestris) for the sites C and D in the Private Natural Heritage Reserve Recanto das Antas and surroundings, in Espírito Santo, Brazil. Each letter represents a location; a number represents a trail; a number and letter, a sub-trail, and the colors represent one individual.
Data
Dendrogram predicting the number of lowland tapirs (Tapirus terrestris) for the site B in the Private Natural Heritage Reserve Recanto das Antas and surroundings, in Espírito Santo, Brazil. Each letter represents a location; a number represents a trail; a number and letter, a sub-trail, and the colors represent one individual.
Data
Dendrogram predicting the number of lowland tapirs (Tapirus terrestris) for the site A in the Private Natural Heritage Reserve Recanto das Antas and surroundings, in Espírito Santo, Brazil. Each letter represents a location; a number represents a trail; a number and letter, a sub-trail; and the colors represent one individual.
Data
Dendrogram predicting the number of lowland tapirs (Tapirus terrestris) for the site E in the Private Natural Heritage Reserve Recanto das Antas and surroundings, in Espírito Santo, Brazil. Each letter represents a location; a number represents a trail; a number and letter, a sub-trail, and the colors represent one individual.
Data
Dendrogram predicting the number of lowland tapirs (Tapirus terrestris) for the site F in the Private Natural Heritage Reserve Recanto das Antas and surroundings, in Espírito Santo, Brazil. Each letter represents a location; a number represents a trail; a number and letter, a sub-trail, and the colors represent one individual.
Data
Feature extraction script for the Lowland tapir in JMP software. Through this script, developed by WildTrack, the landmark points are selected on the basis of foot anatomy to include points which are clearly definable and repeatable across many footprints. After placing the landmark points, a set of derived points, geometrically constructed from th...
Data
Pairwise robust cross-validated discriminant analysis. Pairwise analysis script, developed by WildTrack using a customized model, which generates the algorithm, the cluster dendrogram and the predicted number of individuals. For a detailed description of the development and validation of an optimal algorithm see Li et al. 2017.
Data
Raw data. Lowland tapir footprints information collected in one or more sites in the Private Natural Heritage Reserve Recanto das Antas and surroundings, Espírito Santo, Brazil. Columns X1 to X22, Y1 to Y22, V1 to V91, and area1 to area6 are measurements calculated by the FIT algorithm. Latitude and longitude are in decimal degrees. Trail is an unb...
Data
Lowland tapir footprints training-set database (reference library of footprints) from known captive animals, collected by Medici (2010) and extracted by WildTrack. Each column is a metric derived from the footprints, including lengths, angles, and areas, using the FIT Feature Extraction script (Document S1): V1 to V90 are derived values; columns su...
Article
Full-text available
Data on numbers and distribution of free-ranging giant panda are essential to the formulation of effective conservation strategies. There is still no ideal method to identify individuals and sex this species. The traditional bite-size method using bamboo fragments in their feces lacks accuracy. The modern DNA-based estimation is expensive and deman...
Article
Full-text available
Acquiring reliable data on large felid populations is crucial for effective conservation and management. However, large felids, typically solitary, elusive and nocturnal, are difficult to survey. Tagging and following individuals with VHF or GPS technology is the standard approach, but costs are high and these methodologies can compromise animal we...
Data
WildTrack mountain lion footprint dataset (electronic file). The full set of measurements taken from each footprint of each individual. (XLSX)
Article
Full-text available
Acquiring reliable data on large felid populations is crucial for effective conservation and management. However, large felids, typically solitary, elusive and nocturnal, are difficult to survey. Tagging and following individuals with VHF or GPS technology is the standard approach, but costs are high and these methodologies can compromise animal we...
Article
Full-text available
The cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) is Africa's most endangered large felid and listed as Vulnerable with a declining population trend by the IUCN¹. It ranges widely over sub-Saharan Africa and in parts of the Middle East. Cheetah conservationists face two major challenges, conflict with landowners over the killing of domestic livestock, and concern ove...
Article
Full-text available
Technologies to identify individual animals, follow their movements, identify and locate animal and plant species, and assess the status of their habitats remotely have become better, faster, and cheaper as threats to the survival of species are increasing. New technologies alone do not save species, and new data create new problems. For example, i...
Research
Full-text available
A pilot study undertaken at the invitation of the Ministry of Environment and Tourism (MET) of Namibia in 1997. At this time identification was done primarily by whole-body images taken at waterholes during full moon periods. Footprint identification showed advantages in cost-efficiency and was not limited to full-moon periods.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recognition of animals via images of their footprints is a non-invasive technique recently adopted by researchers interested in monitoring endangered species. One of the challenges that they face is the extraction of features from these images, which are required for this approach. These features are points along the boundary curve of the footprint...
Article
Full-text available
The Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) population in China, once widespread, is now reduced to an estimated 20 individuals widely dispersed over a large area. The Chinese government is making concerted efforts to restore this population from the contiguous Russian population. However, they face a challenge in finding an effective monitoring techn...
Article
Full-text available
A report submitted to the Department of National Parks and Wild Life Management, Zimbabwe
Data
Full-text available
Identifying individual tigers from their paw prints has been controversial. Exciting new methods combine field work and cutting edge statistics from the software giant JMP to show how it can be done. The majestic and enigmatic tiger -arguably our planetʼs most iconic animal and the favourite subject of our childhood books and dreams. There are only...
Article
Full-text available
Monitoring free-ranging animals in their natural habitat is a keystone of ecosystem conservation and increasingly important in the context of current rates of loss of biological diversity. Data collected from individuals of endangered species inform conservation policies. Conservation professionals assume that these data are reliable-that the anima...
Article
For those vertebrate species that create sufficiently complex footprints, identifying individuals from their footprints promises to be a noninvasive technique of great potential for wildlife studies and conservation, but with statistical challenges. Various approaches to employing footprints for identification appear in the literature, but doubt of...
Article
Full-text available
A technique that analyzes images of animal footprints provides reliable data on endangered wildlife populations and individuals. To protect endangered species and understand extinction threats, we need effective monitoring techniques. Biologists have documented around one million species, which represent only 1–10% of all those on earth. Less quant...
Article
Full-text available
Article
Full-text available
http://wildtrack.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Youlatos_2008_IBN.pdf
Article
Full-text available
Radio-collaring is widely used as a monitoring tool in the conservation of the black rhinoceros Diceros bicornis. We examined rates and causes of radio-transmitter collar failure on black rhino in the Sinamatella Intensive Protection Zone (IPZ), Zimbabwe, between September 1993 and February 2000. Two collar designs, hose and strap, were fitted on i...
Article
Full-text available
A non-invasive and cost-effective footprint identification technique (FIT) is presented, which can aid the identification of individual white rhino Ceratotherium simum and the differentiation of this species from black rhino Diceros bicornis. FIT is an adaptation of a traditional tracking identifi- cation technique and is a useful censusing and mon...
Article
Full-text available
The Journal of Zoology's first editorial in response to communications following the publication of our controversial earlier paper. How can we weigh the costs and benefits of immobilization of black rhino.
Article
Full-text available
Forum ± Reply to Raoul du Toit In 1996 we estimated the cost of ®tting one rhino with a radio-collar at Sinamatella to be US1500 (Alibhai et al., 1996). The salary of one game-scout (and thus the support of his family) was then less than half of this ®gure. Nevertheless du Toit (this issue) states that radio-collaring is generally undertaken where...
Article
An objective, non-invasive technique was developed for identifying individual black rhino from their footprints (spoor). Digital images were taken of left hind spoor from tracks (spoor pathways) of 15 known black rhino in Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe. Thirteen landmark points were manually placed on the spoor image and from them, using customized...
Article
Full-text available
Forty-six female black rhino were immobilized 113 times in the Sinamatella Intensive Protection Zone, Zimbabwe, from August 1992 to October 1997. The effects of immobilization on inter-calving interval (ICI), calving rate (calves/female/year), conception and calves born/year were assessed. The mean ICI (n= 17) was 40.24 ± 4.96 months. There was a s...

Questions and Answers

Question & Answers (25)
Question
I'm trying to ascertain the actual rate of morbidity/mortality resulting directly or indirectly from the use of instrumentation on free-ranging animals.  Most 'negative' results are not published.  I'd like to assess the scale of this gap in our knowledge to improve procedures.  If anyone has anecdotal information or can suggest sources I'd be very grateful.  Thanks.
Question
I'm looking for a collaborator on a project to collect simple digital images of free-ranging Mountain lion footprints in natural substrate.  A small grant should be available, and the opportunity to co-author with WildTrack (wildtrack.org).
Image collection protocols are straightforward and training can be given.  We are aiming for 15-20 trails (unbroken series of footprints), each containing about 15-20 footprints.  Each trail would ideally be from a different individual.  Individual identities need not be known, but it would be helpful if some were known.
Question
Has anyone used stationary 3D cameras to reconstruct mesh images of moving objects, and derived morphometrics from them?

Network

Cited By
    • University of California, Berkeley
    • University of St Andrews
    • National University of Singapore
    • Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ / German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig / Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany
    • University of Technology Sydney
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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
To implement a non-invasive and cost-effective approach to monitoring endangered species wherever they leave footprints. Global biodiversity is declining at an unprecedented rate, with humans altering the balance of natural systems such that species are being lost at 100 to 1000 times the natural background rates. The major drivers of biodiversity loss are habitat fragmentation and loss, together with killing of individuals for wildlife products. Climate change is likely to hasten these impacts. The effects of human expansion are exemplified by the extent to which many endangered species, particularly apex predators, are now in conflict with humans. In these times of biodiversity crisis, there’s an urgent need for effective low-cost tools to monitor endangered species and address these conservation challenges. WildTrack has developed a conservation monitoring tool that has the potential to make a real difference. The accurate, non-invasive and cost-effective Footprint Identification Technique (FIT) uses morphometrics from digital images of footprints to identify individual animals of endangered species and thus provide maps of their numbers and distribution - the first essential pre-requisite for their protection and conservation. To date FIT, through baseline databases, has been developed for 15 species, ranging from the giant panda to Bengal tiger and cheetah, but the process has been slow due to few resources and a lack of infrastructure. However, the demand for FIT now greatly exceeds the rate at which it can be delivered. The ConservationFIT project offers a solution, in which a unique new coalition of conservation partners can work together to make FIT available as a new monitoring tool, beginning with three elusive carnivore species; the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), the snow leopard (Panthera uncia) and the jaguar (Panthera onca). More on how you can participate in this project to collect data can be found at www.ConservationFIT.org. It's conservation from the ground up!
Project
This is a long-term program of conservation of tapirs and of other ungulate species in the Atlantic Forest of the state of Espírito Santo, Brazil.