Zhijun Ma

Zhijun Ma
Fudan University · School of Life Sciences

PhD

About

124
Publications
60,609
Reads
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4,810
Citations
Citations since 2017
44 Research Items
3057 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500600
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500600
Introduction
Bird ecology, foucing on migration ecology, habitat ecology and conservation biology
Additional affiliations
July 2000 - present
Fudan University
Position
  • Professor (Full)

Publications

Publications (124)
Article
To reduce the harm to wildlife caused by habitat loss and degradation, significant resources have been invested in habitat restoration worldwide. However, whether restored habitats can support wildlife communities similar to those natural ones remains unclear. Providing habitat for waterbirds, which are dependent on wetland for their survival, is a...
Article
Article Impact Statement: Protecting natural areas and improving the quality of anthropogenic landscapes as habitat are both needed to achieve effective conservation. Abstract: Anthropogenic impacts have reduced natural areas but increased the area of anthropogenic landscapes. There is debate about whether anthropogenic landscapes (e.g., farmland...
Article
Supplemental feeding to mitigate the effects of food shortages may in some cases provide critical help to species conservation. However, supplemental feeding may have both positive and negative effects on wildlife and the environment. A scientifically designed feeding project helps to achieve conservation targets and reduces adverse effects. Here,...
Article
Migratory birds generally use one or more stopover sites for rest and/or refuelling during long-distance migration where a large abundance of diverse species can concentrate into temporary assemblages. Habitat loss at stopover sites has resulted in population declines for many species, in particular shorebirds along the East Asian-Australasian Flyw...
Article
The global aquaculture industry has expanded rapidly and is increasingly important for maintaining food security while also providing alternative artificial habitats for many waterbirds. Clarifying how waterbirds use aquafarms and how aquafarm use affects waterbird population maintenance can be useful for improving management of the artificial land...
Article
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Many studies have documented the average body size of animals declining over time. Compared to mean body size, less is known about long-term changes in intraspecific trait variation (ITV), which is also important to understanding species’ ability to cope with environmental challenges. On the basis of 393,499 specimen records from 380 species collec...
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Along with ongoing loss of natural habitats, expanding artificial (human-made or human-managed) habitats provide alternative habitats for many wildlife species. Many studies have investigated wildlife diversity in artificial habitats, but whether the use of artificial habitats has fitness consequences remains unclear. We compiled global data on bir...
Article
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Each year, billions of birds migrate across the globe, and interpretation of weather radar signals is increasingly being used to document the spatial and temporal migration patterns in Europe and America. Such approaches are yet to be applied in the East Asian-Australasian Flyway (EAAF), one of the most species-rich and threatened flyways in the wo...
Article
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Determining the migration routes and connections of migratory birds at the population level helps clarify intraspecific differences in migration. Five subspecies have been recognized in the Whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus) in Eurasia. ssp. rogachevae is the most recently described subspecies. It breeds in Central Siberia, while its non-breeding region...
Article
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Migratory connectivity describes the extent to which migratory species' populations are connected throughout the annual cycle. While recognized as critical for understanding the population dynamics of migratory species and conserving them, empirical evidence of links between migratory connectivity and population dynamics are uncommon. We analyzed a...
Article
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Aim Molluscs are important grazers, filter and deposit feeders, scavengers and predators, which in turn are food for shorebirds, fish and people. Some species, targeted as human food, have been cultured along the Chinese coast for hundreds of years. To examine whether aquacultural practices have meanwhile affected biodiversity gradients, we measure...
Article
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Background In-flight conditions are hypothesized to influence the timing and success of long-distance migration. Wind assistance and thermal uplift are thought to reduce the energetic costs of flight, humidity, air pressure and temperature may affect the migrants’ water balance, and clouds may impede navigation. Recent advances in animal-borne long...
Article
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Reed marshes are vital habitats for many species of birds, some of which are wholly or largely dependent on this habitat. Reed harvesting in winter is a common practice for increasing economic benefits, but it also promotes reed growth and maintains reed marsh landscapes by removing dry reed stalks. Different reed cutting intervals create different...
Article
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Many birds wintering in the Indian subcontinent fly across the Himalayas during migration, including Bar-headed Geese (Anser indicus), Demoiselle Cranes (Anthropoides virgo) and Ruddy Shelducks (Tadorna ferruginea). However, little is known about whether shorebirds migrate across the Himalayas from wintering grounds beyond the Indian subcontinent....
Article
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Background: Conserving migratory birds is challenging due to their reliance on multiple distant sites at different stages of their annual life cycle. The concept of “flyway”, which refers to all areas covered by the breeding, nonbreeding, and migrating of birds, provides a framework for international cooperation for conservation. In the same flyway...
Preprint
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic has greatly restricted human activities, and wild species are seemingly thriving in human-dominated areas. However, we have little understanding of the consequences for biodiversity from governmental policies and socioeconomic changes in response to COVID-19, and their conservation significance. Understanding these impacts is...
Conference Paper
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We used resightings of banded adults and hatch year birds, molecular markers and stable isotopes to document the migratory connectivity of five subspecies of Dunlin (Calidris alpina) that breed in Beringia and migrate either along the East Asian-Australasian Flyway or the Pacific Flyway of North America. Of more than 4000 Dunlin banded in the past...
Article
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The extent of intertidal flats in the Yellow Sea region has declined significantly in the past few decades, resulting in severe population declines in several waterbird species. The Yellow Sea region holds the primary stopover sites for many shorebirds during their migration to and from northern breeding grounds. However, the functional roles of th...
Article
Wind farms are a cleaner alternative to fossil fuels and may mitigate the effects of climate change. However, they have complex ecological consequences, especially their negative effects on birds. The East China coast is a key part of the East Asian-Australasian flyway (EAAF) for migratory waterbirds, and numerous wind farms have been or will be bu...
Article
Especially in birds, it is widely found that the size of individual prey items follows the size of the instruments of prey capture, handling and processing, i.e. bill size. In fact, this is the natural history basis of major discoveries on adaptative evolution in the face of changing food resources. In some birds, e.g. the molluscivore shorebirds i...
Article
Loss of natural tidal marshes has caused rapid population declines for many bird species, raising the question about whether managed marshes can be used for bird conservation. Although many studies have indicated that managed marshes can provide a complementary habitat for birds, it is unclear how the breeding habitats provided by managed marshes c...
Article
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An increasing number of studies showed that coverage of existing protected areas is not enough to protect biodiversity. However, to what extent and how human population density influence the geographical pattern of protected areas are not clear. Based on 2644 terrestrial nature reserves (NRs) in mainland China in 2015, correlation analysis showed t...
Article
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1.Satellite‐based technologies that track individual animal movements enable the mapping of their spatial and temporal patterns of occurrence. This is particularly useful in poorly studied or remote regions where there is a need for the rapid gathering of relevant ecological knowledge to inform management actions. One such region is East Asia, wher...
Article
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Stopover sites are critical for refueling and resting by migrating birds. Clarifying the habitat requirements of migratory birds during stopover is important for understanding migration ecology and for conservation management. Habitat use by migratory birds at stopover sites, however, has been inadequately studied, and individual variation in habit...
Article
Coastal wetlands are rapidly disappearing worldwide, which is posing a substantial threat to the integrity of coastal ecosystems. In addition to the direct area reduction caused by reclamation, coastal wetlands experience natural changes due to sediment transport in coastal regions. Arguably, the reclamation rates must be less than the net accretio...
Article
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Organisms cope with environmental stressors by behavioral, morphological, and physiological adjustments. Documentation of such adjustments in the wild provides information on the response space in nature and the extent to which behavioral and bodily adjustments lead to appropriate performance effects. Here we studied the morphological and digestive...
Article
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Many species depend on multiple habitats at different points in space and time. Their effective conservation requires an understanding of how and when each habitat is used, coupled with adequate protection. Migratory shorebirds use intertidal and supratidal wetlands, both of which are affected by coastal landscape change. Yet the extent to which sh...
Article
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Nature reserves (NR) are the cornerstone of biodiversity conservation. Over the past 60 years, the rapid expansion of NRs in China, one of the world's megadiverse countries, has played a critical role in slowing biodiversity loss. Yet we show that despite the continuing increase in the number of NRs, the total area of China's NR declined by 3% from...
Article
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Background: China is one of the countries with abundant waterbird diversity. Over the past decades, China's waterbirds have suffered increasing threats from direct and indirect human activities. It is important to clarify the population trends of and threats to waterbirds as well as to put forward conservation recommendations. Methods: We collected...
Article
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Background: Departure decisions and behaviors of migratory birds at stopover sites are expected to maximize fitness by trade-offs among avoiding predators, optimizing refueling (energy) capacity, and matching other life-history events. We predict that species with different body sizes and migratory destinations will exhibit different behaviors when...
Article
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Many shorebird populations are in decline along the East Asian-Australasian Flyway. The rapid loss of coastal wetlands in the Yellow Sea, which provide critical stop-over sites during migration, is believed to be the cause of the alarming trends. The Yalu Jiang coastal wetland, a protected area in the north Yellow Sea, supports the largest known mi...
Article
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Background The motivation of birds to proceed with migration is associated with both endogenous and exogenous factors. According to their migratory situation and to the characteristics of stopover sites, birds might exhibit migratory motivation differently among sites. Although migratory motivation of migrating birds has been well studied in many s...
Article
Prompted by the realization that parts of the coast of southern Jiangsu Province, China, are under threat of reclamation, we here summarize evidence that loss of intertidal habitats around the Yellow Sea and at other parts along the Chinese and Korean coasts has already led to severe population declines of migratory shorebirds, including multiple e...
Article
The Yellow Sea region is of high global importance for waterbird populations, but recent systematic bird count data enabling identification of the most important sites are relatively sparse for some areas. Surveys of waterbirds at three sites on the coast of southern Jiangsu Province, China, in 2014 and 2015 produced peak counts of international im...
Article
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Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) are highly toxic to humans and wildlife. In the present study, PCDD/Fs were analyzed in the eggs of whiskered terns (Chlidonias hybrida), and genetically identified eggs from black-crowned night herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) sampled from two lakes in the Yangtze Ri...
Article
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Competition intensity depends on the number of competitors and the amount of resources available. Coexistence of potential competitors can be enabled through niche differentiation or high resource availability. Using diet analysis, we investigated which of these 2 mechanisms was in play for coexisting shorebirds at a major staging site in the north...
Article
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During the high-tide period, shorebirds that forage on intertidal flats move to sites known as high-tide roosts, which play an important role in their survival. Understanding how shorebirds use high-tide roosts at stopover sites is crucial for their effective conservation and management. As there is a lack of natural roosting habitats along much of...
Article
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Following the closure of the Saemangeum seawall in South Korea in 2006 the Yalu jiang National Nature Reserve, Liaoning, China became the most important staging site in the EAAF for Great Knots Calidris tenuirostris on northward migration. Biomass of their main bivalve prey species Potomacorbula laevis at Yalu jiang NNR has decreased greatly in rec...
Article
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Wetlands along the Yellow Sea coast of China, which are a major staging area for shorebirds in the East Asian-Australasian Flyway, are in a state of crisis that threatens the future of this migration system. Populations of many shorebirds in the Flyway have declined in recent decades at a time when there has been widespread loss of habitat and degr...
Article
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To assess the overall threat status of wild vertebrates in China, the Ministry of Environmental Protection, allied with the Chinese Academy of Sciences, initiated a program compiling a China Biodiversity Red List —Vertebrates in 2013. Through this program, we compiled a Red List of China’s Vertebrates using three documents as reference: (1) IUCN Re...
Article
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1. There is increasing concern about the world’s animal migrations. With many land-use and climatological changes occurring simultaneously, pinning down the causes of large-scale conservation problems requires sophisticated and data-intensive approaches. 2. Declining shorebird numbers along the East Asian–Australasian Flyway, in combination with da...
Article
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Tidal flats play a critical role in supporting biodiversity and in providing ecosystem services but are rapidly disappearing because of human activities. The Yangtze Estuary is one of the world's largest alluvial estuaries and is adjacent to the most developed economic zone in China. Using the Yangtze Estuary as a study region, we developed an auto...
Article
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Selection of timing to match optimal environments is crucial for migrants that breed at high latitudes where there is a narrow time window suitable for breeding. However, birds generally depart from non-breeding grounds in a broad time window. How birds adjust their migration schedule to match optimal timing of arrival at breeding grounds is largel...
Article
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Tidal flats provide ecosystem services to billions of people worldwide, yet their changing status is largely unknown. In the Yellow Sea region of East Asia, tidal flats are the principal coastal ecosystem fringing more than 4000 km of the coastlines of China, North Korea and South Korea. However, widespread loss of areal extent, increasing frequenc...
Article
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X.-W. Huang et al. indicate that the seawalls constructed along the coast can help rocky shore organisms spread to and settle down in a region out of their original biogeographic range, leading to an increase in biodiversity of certain aquatic taxa in the regions where seawalls were built. However
Article
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The widespread decline of migratory shorebirds in the East Asian-Australasian Flyway (EAAF) is one of the greatest crises for migrating birds. Among the migratory species with known population trends, 88% (22 of 25 species) show population declines, and seven have been listed as threatened or Near Threatened in the IUCN Red List. The decline of mig...
Article
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Migratory birds face serious time constraints in their life cycles. Species carry on their activities during optimal time windows to maximise their fitness. To understand the temporal patterns of migrating shorebirds, we analysed the pattern of turnover within shorebird communities during northward and southward migration at Chongming Dongtan, a st...
Article
China's position as the world's second largest economy is largely due to its rapid economic growth in the coastal region, which composes only 13% of China's total land area, yet contributes 60% of the gross domestic product (GDP). To create extra land for the rapidly growing economy, coastal wetlands have been enclosed by thousands of kilometers of...
Article
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Bar-tailed Godwits Limosa lapponica and Great Knots Calidris tenuirostris are long-distance migratory shorebirds with declining numbers in the East Asian-Australasian Flyway. One of the most important staging sites for these two species during northward migration is Yalu Jiang coastal wetland in the north Yellow Sea. Historical counts have been lim...
Article
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The tidal flats of the Yellow Sea support benthic communities that are vitally important to migratory birds, but baseline information on benthic community structure and variability is largely lacking. We investigated spatial and temporal patterns of macrobenthic invertebrates in areas used by large numbers of shorebirds and how these patterns relat...
Article
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Natural coastal wetlands are important habitats for shorebirds while flooded agricultural croplands, may also be useful habitats. Shorebirds in East Asia utilize an often highly developed coastal landscape, which may be dissected by seawalls with intertidal flats on the seaward side, and aquaculture ponds and agricultural croplands on the landward...
Article
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The threatened Marsh Grassbird (Locustella pryeri) first appeared in the salt marsh in east China after the salt marsh was invaded by cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora), a non-native invasive species. To understand the dependence of non-native Marsh Grassbird on the non-native cordgrass, we quantified habitat use, food source, and reproductive succe...
Article
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Winter buds of submerged macrophytes are main food for herbivorous waterfowl in winter. Poyang Lake is important wintering sites for waterbirds in the Yangtze basin. Understanding the spatial distribution of winter buds and their food contribution for herbivorous waterfowl can provide scientific basis for waterfowl conservation and lake management....
Article
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We carried out an observational and experimental study to decipher how resource characteristics, in interaction with the predator's phenotype, constrain a fitness-determining performance measure, i.e. refuelling in a migrant bird. Two subspecies of red knot (Calidris canutus rogersi and C. c. piersmai) use northern Bohai Bay, Yellow Sea, China, for...
Article
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Evidence-based protection of migratory birds at flyway levels requires a solid understanding of their use of ‘stopping sites’ during migration. To characterize the site use of northward-migration great knots Calidris tenuirostris in China, we compared length of stay and fuel deposition during northward migration at areas in the south and the north...
Article
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Birdwatching is a popular activity in western countries where it has helped to integrate research into birds, bird conservation, and socio-economic development. We analysed the development of birdwatching in mainland China and its roles in bird study and conservation using a standard questionnaire and interviews. Birdwatching in mainland China bega...
Article
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Refuelling by migratory birds before take-off on long flights is generally considered a two-phase process, with protein accumulation preceding rapid fat deposition. The first phase expresses the demands for a large digestive system for nutrient storage after shrinkage during previous flights, the second phase the demands for fat stores to fuel the...
Data
Values for variables (following Pennycuick and Battley 2003, Pennycuick 2008) used in the simulation for the flight of red knots. References:Pennycuick C J, Battley P (2003) Burning the engine: a time-marching computation of fat and protein consumption in a 5420-km non-stop flight by great knots, Calidris tenuirostris. Oikos 103∶323–332. Pennycuick...
Data
Regression analyses of the relationship between body components (Y) and body mass (X) of piersmai red knots.The regression models were selected according to AICc in Table S1. The piecewise regression equations and breakpoints for each equation were calculated through the Nonlinear Regression Analysis Program (Advanced GUI version). (DOC)
Data
Regression models for predicting fuel deposition of piersmai red knots at final staging sites in the north Yellow Sea during northward migration. Dependent variables were fat mass, total lean dry mass, lean dry mass of flight muscles, gizzard, leg muscles, standardized lean dry mass of other nutrient organs and fresh mass of flight muscles. Models...
Article
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To understand recent trends in the development of global ornithological research, compare these with related trends and patterns in China, and provide suggestions for future directions for Chinese ornithological research, we conducted a literature review of ornithology-related publications from 1991 to 2010 using reference database: Web of Science....