Zhijie Wang

Zhijie Wang
Colorado State University | CSU · Mechanical Engineering

PhD

About

53
Publications
17,243
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1,556
Citations
Introduction
Zhijie Wang currently works at the Mechanical Engineering, Colorado State University. Zhijie does research in Mechanical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering.
Additional affiliations
October 2016 - present
Colorado State University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
March 2013 - September 2016
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Position
  • Researcher
March 2008 - March 2013
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Position
  • Research Associate

Publications

Publications (53)
Article
Ventricle dysfunction is the most common cause of heart failure, which leads to high mortality and morbidity. The mechanical behavior of the ventricle is critical to its physiological function. It is known that the ventricle is anisotropic and viscoelastic. However, the understanding of ventricular viscoelasticity is much less than that of its elas...
Article
Full-text available
Cardiac biomechanics play a significant role in the progression of structural heart diseases (SHDs). SHDs alter baseline myocardial biomechanics leading to single or bi-ventricular dysfunction. But therapies for left ventricle (LV) failure patients do not always work well for right ventricle (RV) failure patients. This is partly because the basic k...
Article
Full-text available
Capillary rarefaction is a hallmark of right ventricle (RV) failure. Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC)-based therapy offers a potential treatment due to its pro-angiogenic function. However, the impact of RV tissue mechanics on MSC behavior is unclear, especially when referring to RV end-diastolic stiffness and mechanical anisotropy. In this study, we...
Article
Introduction: Right ventricle failure (RVF) secondary to pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a key risk factor for PH patients. The RV mechanical behavior is an important determinant of its function. However, compared to the nonlinear anisotropic elasticity, it remains unclear how RV biaxial viscoelasticity alters with PH. Our goal is to characterize t...
Article
Introduction: Myocardium stiffening is well known in heart failure (HF) development, and it contributes to cardiac dysfunction. Myocardium is viscoelastic, which means that both elastic and viscous resistance exist under dynamic loading. There are limited studies of myocardium viscoelasticity, particularly for the right ventricle (RV). Because vis...
Article
Background: The myocardium is viscoelastic, which means there exists elastic and viscous resistant forces during cardiac motion. It has been shown that cardiomyocyte (CM) or muscle fiber has significant viscoelasticity, and microtubule depolymerization via colchicine treatment reduces the CM's viscoelasticity. However, most prior study is focused...
Article
Background: Myocardial tissues are known to exhibit viscoelastic behavior, i.e., the myocardial wall stress is gradually decaying when stretched at a constant level, referred to as stress relaxation behavior. The study of this behavior becomes important in structural heart diseases, where both passive and active relaxation behaviors of the myocard...
Article
Full-text available
The interventricular septum contributes to the pumping function of both ventricles. However, unlike the ventricular wall, its mechanical behavior remains largely unknown. To fill the knowledge gap, this study aims to characterize the biaxial and transmural variation of the mechanical properties of the septum and compare it to the free walls of the...
Article
Full-text available
Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been studied for nearly two decades as a therapy for myocardial restoration. An emerging direction to repair myocardium is through their paracrine function, which includes the utilization of MSC-derived conditioned medium or extracellular vesicles. In this review, we go over the unique characteristics of MSCs t...
Chapter
Full-text available
The extracellular matrix (ECM) forms a mesh surrounding tissue, made up of fibrous and non-fibrous proteins that contribute to the cellular function, mechanical properties of the tissue and physiological function of the organ. The cardiac ECM remodels in response to mechanical alterations (e.g., pressure overload, volume overload) or injuries (e.g....
Article
Full-text available
Biomaterials to facilitate the restoration of cardiac tissue is of emerging importance. While there are many aspects to consider in the design of biomaterials, mechanical properties can be of particular importance in this dynamically remodeling tissue. This review focuses on one specific processing method, electrospinning, that is employed to gener...
Article
Full-text available
Background Right ventricle failure (RVF) is associated with serious cardiac and pulmonary diseases that contribute significantly to the morbidity and mortality of patients. Currently, the mechanisms of RVF are not fully understood and it is partly due to the lack of large animal models in adult RVF. In this study, we aim to establish a model of RVF...
Article
Full-text available
Heart failure is the leading cause of death worldwide, and the most common cause of heart failure is ventricular dysfunction. It is well known that the ventricles are anisotropic and viscoelastic tissues and their mechanical properties change in diseased states. The tissue mechanical behavior is an important determinant of the function of ventricle...
Article
Right ventricular failure (RVF) is a common cause of death in patients suffering from pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The current treatment for PAH only moderately improves symptoms, and RVF ultimately occurs. Therefore, it is necessary to develop new treatment strategies to protect against right ventricle (RV) maladaptation despite PAH prog...
Chapter
The heart is comprised of cardiac cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) which function together to pump blood throughout the body, provide organs with nutrients and oxygen, and remove metabolic wastes. Cardiac ECM provides a scaffold to cardiac cells and contributes to the mechanical properties and function of the cardiac tissue. Recently, more evid...
Article
Full-text available
Right ventricular (RV) failure, which occurs in the setting of pressure overload, is characterized by abnormalities in mechanical and energetic function. The effects of these cell- and tissue-level changes on organ-level RV function are unknown. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effects of myofiber mechanics and mitochondrial ene...
Article
Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rapidly fatal disease in which mortality is due to right ventricular (RV) failure. It is unclear whether RV dysfunction initiates at the organ level or the subcellular level or both. We hypothesized that chronic pressure overload-induced RV dysfunction begins at the organ level with preserved Frank-Starlin...
Chapter
Biomechanics and mechanobiology are critical to understanding pulmonary disease processes, since altered biological structural mechanics with disease are not only metrics of altered function but also directly affect biological processes, such as signaling and remodeling of the structures themselves. This chapter reviews the current investigations o...
Article
New & noteworthy: The present study found an important role for collagen content, but not collagen cross-linking, in the pulsatile right ventricular (RV) afterload, which is correlated with RV hypertrophy. These results uncover a new collagen-mediated mechanical mechanism of RV dysfunction in early pulmonary hypertension progression. Furthermore,...
Chapter
Full-text available
The aims of this chapter are to review the current state of knowledge regarding the viscoelastic behavior of cardiovascular tissues. We begin with a brief, general discussion of measurement and modeling of cardiovascular tissue viscoelasticity. We then review known viscoelastic behavior of arteries, veins, capillaries, blood components, the heart,...
Article
Full-text available
Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a severe form of pulmonary hypertension in which right ventricular (RV) afterload is increased and death typically occurs due to decompensated RV hypertrophy and failure. Collagen accumulation has been implicated in pulmonary artery remodeling, but how it affects RV performance remains unclear. Here, we soug...
Article
Statement of significance: The literature has proposed several constitutive models to describe the mechanical effects of arterial collagen but none separates collagen content from crosslinking. Given that both are critical to arterial mechanics, the novel model described here does so. Furthermore, our novel model is well tested by experimental dat...
Article
Aging is associated with conduit artery stiffening that is a risk factor for and can precede hypertension and ventricular dysfunction. Increases in mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) frequency have been correlated with aging. Mice with a mutation in the encoding domain (D257A) of a proof-reading deficient version of mtDNA polymerase-γ (POLG) have musculoskel...
Article
Full-text available
Compliance (C) and resistance (R) maintain a unique, inverse relationship in the pulmonary circulation, resulting in a constant characteristic time that has been observed in healthy subjects as well as patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, little is known about the dependence of right ventricular (RV) function on the coupled...
Article
Full-text available
Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) results in right ventricular (RV) dysfunction and failure. Paradoxically, women are more frequently diagnosed with PAH but have better RV systolic function and survival rates than men. The mechanisms by which sex differences alter PAH outcomes remain unknown. Here, we sought to study the role of estrogen in RV...
Article
Full-text available
A computer model was used to analyze data on cardiac and vascular mechanics from C57BL6/J mice exposed to 0 (n = 4), 14 (n = 6), 21 (n = 8) and 28 (n = 7) days of chronic hypoxia and treatment with the VEGF receptor inhibitor SUGEN (HySu) to induce pulmonary hypertension. Data on right ventricular pressure and volume, and systemic arterial pressure...
Article
Full-text available
Right ventricle (RV) dysfunction occurs with progression of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) due to persistently elevated ventricular afterload. A critical knowledge gap is the molecular mechanisms that govern the transition from RV adaptation to RV maladaptation, which leads to failure. Here, we hypothesize that the recently established mouse...
Article
Full-text available
Conduit pulmonary artery (PA) stiffening is characteristic of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and is an excellent predictor of mortality due to right ventricular (RV) overload. To better understand the impact of conduit PA stiffening on RV afterload, it is critical to examine the arterial viscoelastic properties, which require measurements of...
Conference Paper
Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is the most severe form of pulmonary hypertension due to its rapid progression to right ventricular (RV) failure. Until the recent combination of chronic hypoxia with VEGF receptor blockage by SU5416 [1], there was no mouse model for severe PAH. This new model (HySu) recapitulates hallmarks of human PAH, especi...
Article
Full-text available
The recombinant congenic mouse strains HcB-8 and HcB-23 differ in femoral shape, size, and strength, with HcB-8 femora being more gracile, more cylindrical, weaker, and having higher Young's modulus. In previous work, we mapped a robust, pleiotropic quantitative trait locus for these bone traits. Ece1, encoding endothelin converting enzyme 1, is a...
Article
Chronic hypoxia causes pulmonary vasoconstriction and vascular remodeling, which lead to hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH). HPH is associated with living at high altitudes and is a complication of many lung diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, and obstructive sleep apnea. Pulmonary vascular changes that occ...
Article
Large conduit arteries are not purely elastic, but viscoelastic, which affects not only the mechanical behavior but also the ventricular afterload. Different hysteresis loops such as pressure-diameter, pressure-luminal cross-sectional area (LCSA), and stress-strain have been used to estimate damping capacity, which is associated with the ratio of t...
Article
Proximal pulmonary artery (PA) stiffening is a strong predictor of mortality in pulmonary hypertension. Collagen accumulation is mainly responsible for PA stiffening in hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (HPH) in mouse models. We hypothesized that collagen cross-linking and the type I isoform are the main determinants of large PA mechanical cha...
Conference Paper
Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a complex disorder that manifests as abnormally high blood pressure in the vasculature of the lungs. The chronic structural and mechanical changes in the proximal pulmonary artery (PA) associated with PH include smooth muscle cell hypertrophy and proliferation, accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) protein and in...
Article
Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is caused by narrowing and stiffening of the pulmonary arteries that increase pulmonary vascular impedance (PVZ). In particular, small arteries narrow and large arteries stiffen. Large pulmonary artery (PA) stiffness is the best current predictor of mortality from PAH. We have previously shown that collagen acc...
Article
Full-text available
Chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) is associated with large pulmonary artery (PA) stiffening, which is correlated with collagen accumulation. However, the mechanisms by which collagen contributes to PA stiffening remain largely unexplored. Moreover, HPH may alter mechanical properties other than stiffness, such as pulse damping capacity,...
Article
Full-text available
Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with structural and mechanical changes in the pulmonary vascular bed that increase right ventricular (RV) afterload. These changes, characterized by narrowing and stiffening, occur in both proximal and distal pulmonary arteries (PAs). An important consequence of arterial narrowing is increased pulmonary vas...
Article
Full-text available
Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) causes extralobar pulmonary artery (PA) stiffening, which potentially impairs right ventricular systolic function. Changes in the extracellular matrix proteins collagen and elastin have been suggested to contribute to this arterial stiffening. We hypothesized that vascular collagen accumulation is a major cause...
Conference Paper
Chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) is associated with large, conduit pulmonary arterial (PA) remodeling, which is characterized by morphological changes such as accumulation of collagen and elastin and wall thickening1–4. It is estimated that large PA stiffening accounts for over a third of the right ventricular workload increase in pulmo...
Article
Although elevated hemodynamics has been speculated to play a key role in intracranial aneurysm (IA) initiation, little is known about the specific hemodynamic microenvironment that triggers aneurysmal vascular degradation. We previously demonstrated maladaptive remodeling characteristic of IA initiation occurring in hemodynamic regions of combined...
Article
Arterial bifurcation apices are common sites for cerebral aneurysms, raising the possibility that the unique hemodynamic conditions associated with flow dividers predispose the apical vessel wall to aneurysm formation. This study sought to identify the specific hemodynamic insults that lead to maladaptive vascular remodeling associated with aneurys...
Article
Cerebral aneurysms are preferentially located at arterial bifurcation apices with complex hemodynamics. To understand disease mechanisms associated with aneurysm initiation, we attempted to establish a causal relationship between local hemodynamics and vascular responses. Arterial bifurcations were surgically created from native common carotid arte...
Article
Full-text available
Our aim was to examine hemodynamic implications of intravascular stenting in the canine venous pouch (sidewall or straight-vessel) and rabbit elastase (curved-vessel) aneurysm models. Flow dynamics in stented (Wallstent) and nonstented versions were studied by using computational fluid dynamics simulations and in vitro flow visualization, with a fo...
Article
Full-text available
During angiography, blood flow is visualized with a radiopaque contrast agent, which is denser than blood. In complex vasculature, such as cerebral saccular aneurysms, the density difference may produce an appreciable gravity effect, where the contrast material separates from blood and settles along the gravity direction. Although contrast settling...
Conference Paper
Clinical angiographic diagnostics of the hemodynamics of arterial aneurysms are recorded with limited, if any, control over most of the significant physical parameters affecting the outcome of the recorded image sequence. For instance blood flow rate and pressure, aneurysm and arterial geometry and orientation, are all dictated. The contrast media...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
to explore the stem cell therapy for failing right heart
Project
to investigate the biomechanical mechanisms of ventricular-vascular interaction in pulmonary hypertension development