Zegni Triki

Zegni Triki
Stockholm University | SU · Department of Zoology

Phd
PostDoc

About

83
Publications
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326
Citations

Publications

Publications (83)
Article
Full-text available
The 'social brain hypothesis' proposes a causal link between social complexity and either brain size or the size of key brain parts known to be involved in cognitive processing and decision-making. While previous work has focused on comparisons between species, how social complexity affects plasticity in brain morphology at the intraspecific level...
Article
Full-text available
It is generally agreed that variation in social and/or environmental complexity yields variation in selective pressures on brain anatomy, where more complex brains should yield increased intelligence. While these insights are based on many evolutionary studies, it remains unclear how ecology impacts brain plasticity and subsequently cognitive perfo...
Article
Full-text available
Scientists have long struggled to establish how larger brains translate into higher cognitive performance across species. While absolute brain size often yields high predictive power of performance, its positive correlation with body size warrants some level of correction. It is expected that larger brains are needed to control larger bodies withou...
Article
Full-text available
Mosaic brain evolution, the change in the size of separate brain regions in response to selection on cognitive performance, is an important idea in the field of cognitive evolution. However, till now, most of the data on how separate brain regions respond to selection and their cognitive consequences stem from comparative studies. To experimentally...
Article
Full-text available
Determining how variation in brain morphology affects cognitive abilities is important to understand inter-individual variation in cognition and, ultimately , cognitive evolution. Yet, despite many decades of research in this area, there is surprisingly little experimental data available from assays that quantify cognitive abilities and brain morph...
Article
Full-text available
Over the last decades, we witnessed a growing interest in animal cognition, in general, and in fish cognition, in particular. Here, we provide various study examples that employ an ecological approach to study cognition through field observations, field manipulations and laboratory tests on wild teleost fishes. In this review, we focus on cases wit...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, we witnessed an increasing number of funding agencies, scientific journals and scientists agreeing that society and science benefit from open access to research data. Benefits derive mainly from increased access to knowledge for all and improved transparency and credibility in academia. However, despite the advances in open science...
Preprint
Despite the remarkable diversity of life forms on earth, evolutionary biologists have discovered numerous instances where even distantly related species share astonishing similarities in how they behave, look, and function. Given the importance of happenstance in evolution (e.g., random mutations, genetic drift, environmental stochasticity), it is...
Preprint
Full-text available
Determining how variation in brain morphology affects cognitive abilities is important to understand inter-individual variation in cognition and, ultimately, cognitive evolution. Yet, despite many decades of research in this area, there is surprisingly little experimental data available from assays that quantify cognitive abilities and brain morpho...
Article
Full-text available
Across vertebrate species, intergroup conflict confronts individuals with a tension between group interests best served by participation in conflict and personal interest best served by not participating. Here, we identify the neurohormone oxytocin as pivotal to the neurobiological regulation of this tension in distinctly different group-living ver...
Article
Full-text available
Although uniquely destructive and wasteful, intergroup conflict and warfare are not confined to humans. They are seen across a range of group-living species, from social insects, fishes and birds to mammals, including nonhuman primates. With its unique collection of theory, research and review contributions from biology, anthropology and economics,...
Preprint
Full-text available
While it is generally straightforward to quantify individual performance in cognitive experiments, identifying the underlying cognitive processes remains a major challenge. Often, different mechanistic underpinnings yield similar performances, and Lloyd Morgan’s cannon warrants acceptance of the simpler explanation. Alternatively, when the differen...
Preprint
Full-text available
In recent years, we witnessed an increasing number of funding agencies, scientific journals and scientists agreeing that society and science benefit from open access to research data. Benefits derive mainly from increased access to knowledge for all and improved transparency in academia. However, despite the advances in open science and open data,...
Article
Full-text available
Supply and demand affect the values of goods exchanged in cooperative trades. Studies on humans and other species typically describe the standard scenario that an increase in demand leads to a higher price. Here, we challenge the generality of that logic with empirical data and a theoretical model. In our study system, “client” fishes visit cleaner...
Preprint
Full-text available
Across vertebrate species, intergroup conflict confronts individuals with a tension between group interests best served by participation in conflict and personal interest best served by not participating. Here, we identify the neurohormone oxytocin as pivotal to the neurobiological regulation of this tension in distinctly different group-living ver...
Article
Reputation is a fundamental feature of human sociality as it sustains cooperative relationships among unrelated individuals. Research from various disciplines provides insights on how individuals form impressions of others, condition their behaviours based on the reputation of their interacting partners and spread or learn such reputations. However...
Article
Full-text available
Males and females of the same species are known to differ at least in some cognitive domains, but such differences are not systematic across species. As a consequence, it remains unclear whether reported differences generally reflect adaptive adjustments to diverging selective pressures, or whether differences are mere side products of physiologica...
Preprint
Full-text available
Reputation is a fundamental feature of human sociality as it sustains cooperative relations among unrelated individuals. Research from various disciplines provides insights on how individuals form impressions of others, condition their behaviors based on the reputation of their interacting partners, and spread or learn such reputations. However, pa...
Article
Full-text available
Both absolute and relative brain sizes vary greatly among and within the major vertebrate lineages. Scientists have long debated how larger brains in primates and hominins translate into greater cognitive performance, and in particular how to control for the relationship between the noncognitive functions of the brain and body size. One solution to...
Preprint
Full-text available
The telencephalon is a brain region believed to have played an essential role during cognitive evolution in vertebrates. However, till now, all the evidence on the evolutionary association between telencephalon size and cognition stem from comparative studies. To experimentally investigate the potential evolutionary association between cognitive ab...
Preprint
Full-text available
Both absolute and relative brain size vary greatly among and within the major vertebrate lineages. Scientists have long debated how larger brains in primates and hominins translate into greater cognitive performance, and in particular how to control for the relationship between the non-cognitive functions of the brain and body size. One solution to...
Preprint
Full-text available
There are two well-established facts about vertebrate brains: brains are physiologically costly organs, and both absolute and relative brain size varies greatly between and within the major vertebrate clades. While the costs are relatively clear, scientists struggle to establish how larger brains translate into higher cognitive performance. Part of...
Article
Full-text available
In many mutualisms, benefits in the form of food are exchanged for services such as transport or protection. In the marine cleaning mutualism, a variety of “client” reef fishes offer “cleaner” fish Labroides dimidiatus access to food in the form of their ectoparasites, where parasite removal supposedly protects the clients. Yet, the health benefits...
Article
Full-text available
Many “client” coral reef fishes have their ectoparasites removed by the “cleaner” wrasse Labroides dimidiatus in mutualistic interactions. Clients regularly receiving cleaning services reportedly benefit from increased growth and cognitive performance, but the underlying physiological changes that covary with such benefits are unknown. Here, we tes...
Article
Full-text available
Memory is essential to enhance future survival and reproduction as it helps in storing and retrieving useful information to solve particular environmental problems. However, we lack quantitative evidence on how far animals in the wild can maintain given information for extended periods without reinforcement. Here, we document correlative evidence o...
Article
Full-text available
To develop an evolutionary theory of social decision making, we require an understanding of how in- dividuals utilize environmental cues to form decision rules. We exposed ‘cleaner’ fish (bluestreak cleaner wrasse, Labroides dimidiatus) to a biological market task, where giving priority to an ephemeral (i.e. ‘visitor’ client) food plate, over a per...
Article
Full-text available
Market-like situations emerge in nature when trading partners exchange goods and services. However, how partner choice option contributes to the expression of social strategic sophistication (i.e., the ability to adjust behavior flexibly given the specifics of a situation) is still poorly understood. A suitable study system to explore this question...
Article
Full-text available
Global warming is predicted to increase the frequency and or severity of many disturbances including cyclones, storms, and prolonged heatwaves. The coral reef at Lizard Island, part of the Great Barrier Reef, has been recently exposed to a sequence of severe tropical cyclones (i.e., Ita in 2014 and Nathan in 2015) and a coral bleaching in the year...
Thesis
Full-text available
There is substantial variation in either absolute or relative brain size between vertebrates. Comparing vertebrate species is the most commonly used method when exploring the link between brain size variation and ecological conditions. Nevertheless, there is an ongoing debate about whether the main selective factors on the evolution of brain comple...
Article
Full-text available
Humans cooperate with unrelated individuals to an extent that far outstrips any other species. We also display extreme variation in decisions about whether to cooperate or not, and the mechanisms driving this variation remain an open question across the behavioural sciences. One candidate mechanism underlying this variation in cooperation is the ev...
Article
Full-text available
Several species of primates, including humans, possess a spontaneous spatial mental arrangement (i.e. mental number line MNL) of increasing numbers or continuous quantities from left to right. This cognitive process has recently been documented in domestic chicken in a spatial–numerical task, opening the possibility that MNL is a cognitive capacity...
Article
Full-text available
Adjusting one’s behaviour in response to eavesdropping bystanders is considered a sophisticated social strategy, yet the underlying mechanisms are not well studied. Cleaner wrasse, Labroides dimidiatus, cooperate by eating ectoparasites off “client” fishes, or cheat (i.e. bite) and eat client mucus. Image scoring by bystander clients generally caus...
Article
Full-text available
Coral reef ecosystems are declining worldwide and under foreseeable threat due to climate change, resulting in significant changes in reef communities. It is unknown, however, how such community changes impact interspecific interactions. Recent extreme weather events affecting the Great Barrier Reef, that is, consecutive cyclones and the 2016 El Ni...
Article
Oxytocin (OT) mediates social habituation in rodent model systems, but its role in mediating this effect in other vertebrates is unknown. We used males of the African cichlid fish, Astatotilapia burtoni, to investigate two aspects of isotocin (IT; an OT homolog) signaling in social habituation. First, we examined the expression of IT receptor 2 (IT...
Article
Many species engage in mutualistic relationships with other species. The physiological mechanisms that affect the course of such social interactions are little understood. In the cleaning mutualism, cleaner fish Labroides dimidiatus do not always act cooperatively by eating ectoparasites, but sometimes cheat by taking bites of mucus from so-called...