Zarah Pattison

Zarah Pattison
Newcastle University | NCL · School of Natural and Environmental Sciences

BSc (Hons), MRes, PhD

About

26
Publications
7,194
Reads
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562
Citations
Citations since 2016
23 Research Items
560 Citations
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Introduction
Broad research interests include responses of invasive alien plants to changes in climate and how this impacts native communities. Also interested in the competitive effects between dominant native and invasive alien plant species at varying spatial and temporal scales. Previous research addressed questions relating to connectivity and presence/abundance of pathogenic bacteria in freshwater systems. Current research is focused on predicting environmental drivers of aquatic invasive alien plant hotspots globally.
Additional affiliations
June 2019 - present
Newcastle University
Position
  • Lecturer
October 2018 - June 2019
Scottish Government
Position
  • Statistician
July 2018 - October 2018
University of Stirling
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
November 2012 - July 2016
University of Stirling
Field of study
  • Ecology
September 2011 - September 2012
Royal Holloway, University of London
Field of study
  • Ecological Research Masters
October 2008 - September 2011
Royal Holloway, University of London
Field of study
  • Ecology and the Environment

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
The abundance of invasive alien plants (IAPs) can vary dramatically over small spatial scales for reasons that are often unclear. Understanding these could offer key insights for containing invasions, accepting that eradication is often no longer feasible. This study investigated determinants of IAP cover on riverbanks, a well-known hotspot of inva...
Article
Full-text available
Question: Which environmental factors influence the occurrence of invasive alien plants (IAPs) in riparian habitats and how much can IAPs account for change in native vegetation compared with other environmental variables? Location: Rivers distributed throughout mainland Britain. Methods: We quantified change in river bank vegetation using survey d...
Article
Full-text available
Impatiens glandulifera is one of the most widespread invasive plant species in the UK. Although aspects of its biology are known, there is little information about its association with microbial communities, both above ground and below ground. Furthermore, it is unknown whether this species exhibits any form of plant–soil feedback (PSF), commonly s...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Riparian zones are dynamic habitats with complex disturbance regimes. They are also highly prone to invasion by non-native plants, such as Himalayan Balsam (Impatiens glandulifera) in NW Europe. There is much concern over the potential impacts of invasive non-native plants (IAPs) on native riparian vegetation yet IAPs might essentially be passenger...
Article
Full-text available
Flow regulation is a prolific and growing influence on rivers world‐wide. Nine cascade hydropower dams were constructed along the 1,150‐km Wujiang River in China over the past 30 years, disrupting longitudinal continuity. Water level fluctuations in the associated reservoirs range between daily, weekly, seasonal, and annual, depending on the type o...
Article
Full-text available
Although the high costs of invasion are frequently cited and are a key motivation for environmental management and policy, synthesised data on invasion costs are scarce. Here, we quantify and examine the monetary costs of biological invasions in the United Kingdom (UK) using a global synthesis of reported invasion costs. Invasive alien species have...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive species have caused severe impacts on biodiversity and human society. Although the estimation of environmental impacts caused by invasive species has increased in recent years, economic losses associated with biological invasions are only sporadically estimated in space and time. In this study, we synthesized the losses incurred by invasio...
Article
Full-text available
Much research effort has been invested in understanding ecological impacts of invasive alien species (IAS) across ecosystems and taxonomic groups, but empirical studies about economic effects lack synthesis. Using a comprehensive global database, we determine patterns and trends in economic costs of aquatic IAS by examining: (i) the distribution of...
Chapter
a.Aim Outline of how the impact of non-native species can be defined and assessed, and how harmful non-native species can be managed across the different stages of the invasion process. b.Main concepts covered Impact as a concept in invasion biology; impact scales, levels and mechanisms; management categories c.Main methods covered EICAT and SEICAT...
Article
The Atlantic Forest, a global biodiversity hotspot, has changed dramatically due to land use pressures causing deforestation, degradation, and forest fragmentation. A major challenge is to understand and potentially mitigate the consequences of these changes, for the capacity of forests to deliver essential environmental services to rural areas. He...
Article
Full-text available
The current global biodiversity governance system is failing to adequately protect species and halt extinctions. This raises concerns that a lack of coherence among conventions has hindered their effective implementation. We assessed the possibility for improved convention coherence by identifying overlaps among four major international biodiversit...
Article
Full-text available
Biological invasions have steadily increased over recent centuries. However, we still lack a clear expectation about future trends in alien species numbers. In particular, we do not know whether alien species will continue to accumulate in regional floras and faunas, or whether the pace of accumulation will decrease due to the depletion of native s...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Atlantic Forest, a global biodiversity hotspot, has changed dramatically due to land 12 use pressures causing deforestation, degradation, and forest fragmentation. A major challenge is 13 to understand and potentially mitigate the consequences of these changes, for the capacity of 14 forests to deliver essential environmental services to rural...
Article
Full-text available
Freshwaters are among the most globally threatened habitats and their biodiversity is declining at an unparalleled rate. In an attempt to slow this decline, multiple approaches have been used to conserve, restore or enhance waterbodies. However, evaluating their effectiveness is time‐consuming and expensive. Identifying species or assemblages acros...
Article
Full-text available
Riparian zones are complex, dynamic habitats that play a critical role in river ecosystem functioning. Terrestrial invertebrates comprise much of the diversity found in riparian habitats and facilitate the transfer of energy between aquatic and terrestrial systems. However, the consequences for terrestrial invertebrates of invasion of riparian zone...
Article
Full-text available
Invasion of riparian zones by non‐native plants is a global issue and commonly perceived as a challenge for river and fishery managers, but the type and extent of ecological changes induced by such invasions remain poorly understood. Established effects on sediment delivery, allochthonous inputs, and channel shading could potentially alter aquatic...
Article
Full-text available
Riparian zones are formed by interactions between fluvio-geomorphological processes, such as sediment deposition, and biota, such as vegetation. Establishment of invasive alien plant (IAP) species along rivers may influence vegetation dynamics, evidenced as higher seasonal or inter-annual fluctuations in native plant diversity when IAP cover is hig...
Poster
Full-text available
High spatial heterogeneity of faecal pollution in urban lakes
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Riparian habitats are vulnerable to invasion, due to fluvial disturbance and flow-assisted dispersal of propagules. The interactive effects of invasion and climate change are thus likely to be an increasing influence on riparian zones. Many studies have been conducted assessing the potential impact of invasive alien plant species (IAPs). However, t...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I have used AstroTurf mats to trap propagules (seeds and vegetative fragments) deposited over winter along river banks. The propagules deposited on these mats will be used in a germination trial to assess abundance and species richness of viable propagules. I have reviewed the methods used in similar studies, such as those by Gurnell, Goodson, and Cockel. The authors in these various studies germinated propagules directly on the mat in a seedling tray, which in some instances was supplemented with sterile soil when needed. Other studies assessing sediment deposition and propagules wash the mats and germinate in seed trays.
As I am not assessing sediment is there any benefit to washing the mats prior to germination, so that they germinate in sterile compost rather than directly on the turf mats? I.e. Will it aid the germination of propagules?

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Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Assessing the economic costs of biological invasions, for all taxa, all regions, all activity sectors, all types of economic costs, and much more!
Project
https://hydroscapeblog.wordpress.com